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Physics - Materials Science - 05.11.2019
4D-STEM Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atomic 'Neighborhoods'
4D-STEM Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atomic ’Neighborhoods’
Scientists use powerful 4D-STEM electron microscopy technique to map out the best atomic 'hangouts' in high-performance materials W e can directly see the hidden world of atoms thanks to electron microscopes, first developed in the 1930s. Today, electron microscopes, which use beams of electrons to illuminate and magnify a sample, have become even more sophisticated, allowing scientists to take real-world snapshots of materials with a resolution of less than half the diameter of a hydrogen atom.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Light-based 'tractor beam' assembles materials at the nanoscale
Light-based ’tractor beam’ assembles materials at the nanoscale
Modern construction is a precision endeavor. Builders must use components manufactured to meet specific standards - such as beams of a desired composition or rivets of a specific size. The building industry relies on manufacturers to create these components reliably and reproducibly in order to construct secure bridges and sound skyscrapers.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Scientists spy unstable semiconductors
Scientists from Cardiff University have, for the first time, spotted previously unseen "instabilities" on the surface of a common compound semiconductor material. The findings could potentially have profound consequences for the development of future materials in the electronic devices that power our daily lives.

Physics - Materials Science - 31.10.2019
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells
People can be good at hiding strain, and we're not alone. Solar cells have the same talent. For a solar cell, physical strain within its microscopic crystalline structure can interrupt its core function - converting sunlight into electricity - by essentially "losing” energy as heat. For an emerging type of solar cell, known as lead halide perovskites, reducing and taming this loss is key to improving efficiency and putting the perovskites on par with today's silicon solar cells.

Materials Science - Innovation - 30.10.2019
Advanced carbon materials research boosted by new funding
Advanced carbon materials research boosted by new funding
The University of Sydney's research collaboration with Hazer Group has received an additional $811,712 in funding following a new partnership with the Innovative Manufacturing CRC. University of Sydney Chemical Engineer Professor Yuan Chen 's ongoing research into developing and optimising advanced carbon materials (ACM) in partnership with Hazer Group has been bolstered with an additional $811,712 in funding awarded by the Innovative Manufacturing CRC (IMCRC).

Physics - Materials Science - 24.10.2019
Living on the Edge: How a 2D Material Got Its Shape
Living on the Edge: How a 2D Material Got Its Shape
Scientists at Berkeley Lab discover that nanoparticles' 'edge energy' gets them in 2D shape for energy storage applications Ever since its discovery in 2004, graphene - an atomically thin material with amazing strength and electrical properties - has inspired scientists around the world to design new 2D materials to serve a broad range of applications, from renewable energy and catalysts to microelectronics.

Health - Materials Science - 23.10.2019
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
Monitoring the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium
ETH researchers have recently been able to monitor the corrosion of bioresorbable magnesium alloys at the nanoscale over a time scale of a few seconds to many hours. This is an important step towards accurately predicting how fast implants are resorbed by the body to enable the development of tailored materials for temporary implant applications.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 21.10.2019
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer
With a new process developed at TU Wien (Vienna), living cells can be integrated into fine structures created in a 3D printer - extremely fast and with very high resolution. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework.

Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2019
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behaviour and identify the important new ones. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.10.2019
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
Solving the Mystery of Quantum Light in Thin Layers
A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna). It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to glow in a highly unusual fashion.

Materials Science - 14.10.2019
Cells’ mitochondria work much like Tesla battery packs
For years, scientists assumed that mitochondria — the energy-generating centers of living cells — worked much like household batteries, generating energy from a chemical reaction inside a single chamber or cell. Now, UCLA researchers have shown that mitochondria are instead made up of many individual bioelectric units that generate energy in an array, similar to a Tesla electric car battery that packs thousands of battery cells to manage energy safely and provide fast access to very high current.

Materials Science - Physics - 11.10.2019
White blood cell ’security guard’ and community messages: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a white blood cell playing a 'security guard' role, to the President's call for collaboration and community, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Patrolling eye Researchers from Imperial have discovered a new 'security guard' role for a type of white blood cell called a neutrophil.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.10.2019
Simple Materials Offer a Peek into the Quantum Realm
Simple Materials Offer a Peek into the Quantum Realm
As reported , a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists were the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moiré superlattices. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties.

Materials Science - 09.10.2019
Archives Digitize Decades of Mellon Institute Records
Carnegie Mellon's University Libraries have organized and preserved 347 boxes of records from the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, one of the nation's premier independent research centers, making the records more widely discoverable and available to researchers. "No one has written a comprehensive history on the Mellon Institute, how it factored into the larger industrial research ecosystem or its contributions to science," said Project Archivist Emily Davis, who led the digitization effort.

Music - Materials Science - 08.10.2019
Romantic Replicas
Romantic Replicas
To play a piece of music as it was conceived by the composer is a trend. But where can the rare historical instruments be found? The solution would be exact copies of the coveted originals. A team of Empa researchers is analysing such replicas with the aim of reproducing historical trombones with their typical sound.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.10.2019
A promising route to scalable quantum photonics
A promising route to scalable quantum photonics
Researchers from the Photonics Research Group (imec, Ghent University) and MIT have integrated single photon emitters in 2D layered materials with a Silicon Nitride photonic chip. Even for moderate quantum yields, dielectric cavities could be designed such that the single photon extraction into the guided mode can reach unity.

Materials Science - Health - 08.10.2019
On Your Medicine's Secret Service
On Your Medicine’s Secret Service
Whether a wound heals well under a dressing cannot be seen from the outside. Empa researchers are now enabling a view through the bandage à la James Bond. The refined application of terahertz radiation could promote the analysis of multi-layered tissues for medical purposes and be used for wound treatment or the diagnostics of blood vessel plaques.

Music - Materials Science - 08.10.2019
An Open Ear for Noise
An Open Ear for Noise
A rippling stream is Jean-Marc Wunderli's favourite sound. However, his everyday research has little to do with calming natural sounds. He deals with completely different ones: noise from aircraft turbines, train noise, busy roads, wind turbines and now even drones. All these emissions are part of the research activities of Empa's Acoustics / Noise Control Lab, which Wunderli is heading since last July.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.10.2019
Unbreakable
Unbreakable
Can glass flow at room temperature and thus withstand hard impacts' A theory from the 1970s predicted exactly this. Empa researchers have now provided the proof. The results could form the basis for robust 3D printed glass microarchitectures. No one in the world has ever seen what we have measured," says Rajaprakash Ramachandramoorthy.