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Physics - Materials Science - 08.03.2019
Scientists Take a Deep Dive Into the Imperfect World of 2D Materials
Scientists Take a Deep Dive Into the Imperfect World of 2D Materials
Berkeley Lab-led team combines several nanoscale techniques to gain new insights on the effects of defects in a well-studied monolayer material Nothing is perfect, or so the saying goes, and that's not always a bad thing. In a study at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), scientists learned how nanoscale defects can enhance the properties of an ultrathin, so-called 2D material.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.03.2019
Super superlattices: The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene
Super superlattices: The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene
Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride.

Physics - Materials Science - 07.03.2019
When Semiconductors Stick Together, Materials Go Quantum
When Semiconductors Stick Together, Materials Go Quantum
A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material A method developed by a Berkeley Lab-led research team may one day turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum electronic devices. (Credit: iStock.com/NiPlot) A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a simple method that could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines - superthin devices marked by extraordinary electronic behavior.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 06.03.2019
Smoothing out the wrinkles in graphene
Smoothing out the wrinkles in graphene
Coating graphene with wax makes for a less contaminated surface during device manufacturing. To protect graphene from performance-impairing wrinkles and contaminants that mar its surface during device fabrication, MIT researchers have turned to an everyday material: wax. Graphene is an atom-thin material that holds promise for making next-generation electronics.

Materials Science - Innovation - 06.03.2019
A self-healing composite
A self-healing composite
Researchers from EPFL's Laboratory for Processing of Advanced Composites have developed a material that can easily heal after being damaged. This cutting-edge composite could be used in aircraft, wind turbines, cars and sports equipment. When a wind turbine blade or an airplane is hit by something, the damaged part has to be either replaced or patched with resin.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 06.03.2019
Plumbing the Depths of Interfaces and Finding Buried Treasure
Plumbing the Depths of Interfaces and Finding Buried Treasure
By Lauren Chong Understanding the interfaces where solids and liquids meet is key to controlling a wide range of energy-relevant processes, from how batteries store energy to how metals corrode, and more. However, there are many unanswered questions around how these processes work at the atomic or molecular scale.

Music - Materials Science - 05.03.2019
Virtual noise
Virtual noise
Railway noise is annoying. Trains cause numerous sleepless nights, especially in the vicinity of residential areas. This makes it all the more important to optimize trains and tracks in such a way as to dampen sounds. Empa researchers have devised a computer simulation that demonstrates how railway noise is created in the first place and which technical measures are effective in preventing it.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 01.03.2019
Spider silk could be used as robotic muscle
Spider silk could be used as robotic muscle
Unusual property of the ultrastrong material could be harnessed for twisting or pulling motions. Spider silk, already known as one of the strongest materials for its weight, turns out to have another unusual property that might lead to new kinds of artificial muscles or robotic actuators, researchers have found.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.02.2019
Engineers make clear droplets produce iridescent colors
Engineers make clear droplets produce iridescent colors
Optical effect could be harnessed for light displays, litmus tests, and makeup products. In a paper , the team reports that a surface covered in a fine mist of transparent droplets and lit with a single lamp should produce a bright color if each tiny droplet is precisely the same size. This iridescent effect is due to "structural color," by which an object generates color simply due to the way light interacts with its geometric structure.

Physics - Materials Science - 25.02.2019
It's all in the twist: Physicists stack 2D materials at angles to trap particles on the nanoscale, creating a unique platform to study quantum optical physics
It’s all in the twist: Physicists stack 2D materials at angles to trap particles on the nanoscale, creating a unique platform to study quantum optical physics
Future technologies based on the principles of quantum mechanics could revolutionize information technology. But to realize the devices of tomorrow, today's physicists must develop precise and reliable platforms to trap and manipulate quantum-mechanical particles. In a paper published Feb. 25 , a team of physicists from the University of Washington, the University of Hong Kong, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee reports that they have developed a new system to trap individual excitons.

Materials Science - 20.02.2019
Making Green Cars Greener
CMU Researchers Examine Ways To Recycle Electric Vehicle Batteries The widespread implementation of electric vehicles will go a long way toward eliminating the greenhouse gas emissions of the transportation sector. But these emissions don't just come from the tailpipe. There's another major culprit of greenhouse gases, one that the electric vehicle industry might need some help from policymakers to avoid: battery recycling.

Materials Science - Environment - 18.02.2019
Lobster's underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Lobster’s underbelly is as tough as industrial rubber
Membrane material's properties could guide design of flexible body armor, new study suggests. Flip a lobster on its back, and you'll see that the underside of its tail is split in segments connected by a translucent membrane that appears rather vulnerable when compared with the armor-like carapace that shields the rest of the crustacean.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 14.02.2019
Ers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that can better withstand extreme temperatures
Ers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that can better withstand extreme temperatures
UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft Matthew Chin UCLA researchers and collaborators at eight other research institutions have created an extremely light, very durable ceramic aerogel. The material could be used for applications like insulating spacecraft because it can withstand the intense heat and severe temperature changes that space missions endure.

Materials Science - Physics - 14.02.2019
Solar-powered supercapacitors could create flexible, wearable electronics
A breakthrough in energy storage technology could bring a new generation of flexible electronic devices to life, including solar-powered prosthetics for amputees. In a new paper published in the journal Advanced Science , a team of engineers from the University of Glasgow discuss how they have used layers of graphene and polyurethane to create a flexible supercapacitor which can generate power from the sun and store excess energy for later use.

Physics - Materials Science - 13.02.2019
World's finest gold specimen probed with Los Alamos neutrons
World’s finest gold specimen probed with Los Alamos neutrons
Los Alamos, New Mexico, Feb 13, 2019-Using neutron characterization techniques a team of scientists have peered inside one of the most unique examples of wire gold, understanding for the first time the specimen's structure and possible formation process. The 263 gram, 12 centimeter tall specimen, known as the Ram's Horn, belongs to the collection of the Mineralogical and Geological Museum Harvard University (MGMH).

Physics - Materials Science - 12.02.2019
Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time
Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time
One of the key building blocks of flexible photonic circuits and ultra-thin optics are metasurfaces. And EPFL engineers have now discovered a simple way of making these surfaces in just a few minutes - without needing a clean room - using a method already employed in manufacturing. Their findings have just been published.

Physics - Materials Science - 11.02.2019
Using artificial intelligence to engineer materials' properties
Using artificial intelligence to engineer materials’ properties
New system of "strain engineering" can change a material's optical, electrical, and thermal properties. Applying just a bit of strain to a piece of semiconductor or other crystalline material can deform the orderly arrangement of atoms in its structure enough to cause dramatic changes in its properties, such as the way it conducts electricity, transmits light, or conducts heat.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.02.2019
What does it take to make a better battery?
What does it take to make a better battery?
Cambridge researchers are working to solve one of technology's biggest puzzles: how to build next-generation batteries that could power a green revolution. A better battery could make all the difference. So what's holding up progress? Like many of us, when I wake up I reach for the phone on my bedside table and begin scrolling through Twitter, Instagram, email and news apps.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.02.2019
Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components
Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components
Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.02.2019
Unleashing perovskites' potential for solar cells
Unleashing perovskites’ potential for solar cells
New results show how varying the recipe could bring these materials closer to commercialization. Perovskites - a broad category of compounds that share a certain crystal structure - have attracted a great deal of attention as potential new solar-cell materials because of their low cost, flexibility, and relatively easy manufacturing process.