news

« BACK

Physics



Results 1 - 20 of 4882.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 245 Next »


Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 01.12.2021
Mysterious clouds could offer new clues on dark matter
Mysterious clouds could offer new clues on dark matter
The hunt for gravitational waves, ripples in space and time caused by major cosmic cataclysms, could help solve one of the Universe's other burning mysteries - boson clouds and whether they are a leading contender for dark matter. Researchers are using powerful instruments, like the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), advanced Virgo, and KAGRA, that detect gravitational waves up to billions of light years away to locate potential boson clouds.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 01.12.2021
Opinion: AI can reliably spot molecules on exoplanets - and might even discover new laws of Physics
Opinion: AI can reliably spot molecules on exoplanets - and might even discover new laws of Physics
Research into the logic behind AI shows that algorithms think in reliable and scientific ways that could help us learn undiscovered laws of physics, say PhD candidate Kai Hou Yip and Dr Quentin Changeat (both UCL Physics & Astronomy). Do you know what the Earth's atmosphere is made of? You'd probably remember it's oxygen, and maybe nitrogen.

Life Sciences - Physics - 30.11.2021
Flu Virus Shells Could Improve Delivery of mRNA Into Cells
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new and potentially more effective way to deliver messenger RNA (mRNA) into cells. Their approach involves packing mRNA inside nanoparticles that mimic the flu virus—a naturally efficient vehicle for delivering genetic material such as RNA inside cells.

Physics - Electroengineering - 30.11.2021
Quantum physics across dimensions: Unidirectional Kondo Scattering
Quantum physics across dimensions: Unidirectional Kondo Scattering
An international team led by scientists, has unveiled a unique quantum-mechanical interaction between electrons and topological defects in layered materials that has only been observed in engineered atomic thin layers. The phenomenon can be reproduced by the native defects of lab grown large crystals, making future investigation of Kondo systems and quantum electronic devices more accessible.

Physics - Chemistry - 30.11.2021
Chloro-phylling in the Answers to Big Questions
Chloro-phylling in the Answers to Big Questions
A Q&A with researchers who are focused on revealing the fine details of photosynthesis B erkeley Lab scientists specialize in investigating fundamental scientific questions that, when answered, could lead to world-changing advances in technology, medicine, or energy. One of these big questions is how, exactly, photosynthesis occurs.

Physics - 30.11.2021
Shining new light on elusive flying bats
Shining new light on elusive flying bats
International research team led by Göttingen University develops novel sampling method for bats How can we understand the activity of wild bats? Mostly soundless, flying in the dark, bats feed at night and evade our senses. Many bats can use echolocation to hunt and can avoid the traditional nets used to capture them; those that do not "echolocate" cannot be detected by ultrasound bat detectors.

Physics - 29.11.2021
Breaking the symmetry of sound waves allows the sound to be directed to a certain place
Research undertaken by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has concluded that sound can be directed to a certain place if the sound waves' symmetry is broken. In order to carry out this work, recently published in the Nature journal, researchers used the whispering gallery phenomenon, a circular, vaulted room in which you can hear what is being said in a specific part of the room from anywhere, even if it is being whispered.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.11.2021
Space dust analysis could solve mystery of the origins of Earth’s water
An international team of scientists may have solved a key mystery about the origins of the Earth's water, after uncovering persuasive new evidence pointing to an unlikely culprit - the Sun. In a new paper published today in the journal Nature Astronomy , a team of researchers from the UK, Australia and America describe how new analysis of an ancient asteroid suggests that extraterrestrial dust grains carried water to Earth as the planet formed.

Life Sciences - Physics - 26.11.2021
Three-dimensional X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease
Three-dimensional X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease
Team from Göttingen University and University Medical Center identifies changes in nerve tissue in Alzheimer's What changes occur in parts of the brain affected by neurodegenerative disease? How does the structure of the neurons change? Some pathological changes in the tissue are easy to identify using standard microscopy.

Physics - 26.11.2021
In quantum mechanics, not even time flows as you might expect it to
In quantum mechanics, not even time flows as you might expect it to
The boundary between forward and backward blurs in quantum mechanics A team of physicists at the Universities of Vienna, Bristol, the Balearic Islands and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI-Vienna) has shown how quantum systems can simultaneously evolve along two opposite time arrows (forward and backward in time).

Health - Physics - 25.11.2021
Proton therapy: a success story that started 25 years ago
Proton therapy: a success story that started 25 years ago
On 25 November 1996, the Center for Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI treated a cancer patient using the spot-scanning technique for the very first time - a world premiere. This technique developed at PSI scans and irradiates deep-seated tumours with a pencil-thin beam of charged particles, killing cancer cells with extreme precision while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue.

Physics - Materials Science - 23.11.2021
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Graphene-like 2D material leverages quantum effects to achieve ultra-low friction
Researchers from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering and Rice University have reported the first measurements of the ultra-low-friction behaviour of a material known as magnetene. The results point the way toward strategies for designing similar low-friction materials for use in a variety of fields, including tiny, implantable devices.  Magnetene is a 2D material, meaning it's composed of a single layer of atoms.

Physics - Mathematics - 22.11.2021
Looking into four-dimensional space with light
Looking into four-dimensional space with light
Light is used for various purposes in nowadays applications. For example, data can be transmitted with light and nanoscopic structures can be created by light. To enable such applications, light must be structured. To do this, its properties - intensity (brightness), phase (position in oscillation-cycle) and polarization (direction of the oscillation) - are "tailored".

Materials Science - Physics - 22.11.2021
Mystery of high-performing solar cell materials revealed in stunning clarity | University of Cambridge
Mystery of high-performing solar cell materials revealed in stunning clarity | University of Cambridge
Researchers have visualised, for the first time, why perovskites - materials which could replace silicon in next-generation solar cells - are seemingly so tolerant of defects in their structure. The findings , led by researchers from the , are published .

Physics - 22.11.2021
Fundamental particles modelled in beam of light
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Scientists at the University of Birmingham have succeeded in creating an experimental model of an elusive kind of fundamental particle called a skyrmion in a beam of light. The breakthrough provides physicists with a real system demonstrating the behaviour of skyrmions, first proposed 60 years ago by a University of Birmingham mathematical physicist, Professor Tony Skyrme.

Health - Physics - 22.11.2021
How Well Do Wet Masks Contain Droplets?
Study shows damp masks still stop respiratory droplet penetration After studying the effectiveness of varying layers of masks in stopping respiratory droplets from escaping face masks, a team of international researchers has now turned their attention to modeling what happens to droplets when they come in contact with wet masks.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.11.2021
Refuting A 70-year Approach To Predicting Material Microstructure
Carnegie Mellon University A 70-year-old model used to predict the microstructure of materials doesn't work, according to Carnegie Mellon researchers in Science. A microscopy technique developed by Carnegie Mellon and Argonne National Laboratory yields evidence that contradicts the conventional model and points the way toward the use of new types of characterizations to predict properties - and therefore the safety and long-term durability - of new materials.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.11.2021
Research casts new light on processes behind solar eruptions
New research into the powerful magnetic fields which form inside the sun and cause violent eruptions could help predict solar flares. Mathematicians and astrophysicists from the UK and Italy have comprehensively modelled the emergence of twisted magnetic fields into the solar atmosphere, and verified their models through observations - a breakthrough in scientific understanding of the process by which solar flares occur.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.11.2021
Computer modelling of black hole's jets supports Einstein's theory
Computer modelling of black hole’s jets supports Einstein’s theory
An international team involving UCL researchers has developed a computer model of the powerful jets released by the M87 black hole, matching the observations of astronomers and providing new support for the theory of general relativity. The black hole launches a jet of plasma at very close to the speed of light, a so-called relativistic jet, over a distance of more than 6,000 light years (that is, the jet extends beyond the giant galaxy in which the black hole resides).

Life Sciences - Physics - 12.11.2021
Xist marks the spot: How an RNA molecule silences the X chromosome
In one of the mysteries of mammalian development, every cell in the early female embryo shuts down one of its two copies of the X chromosome, leaving just one functional. For years, the mechanics behind this X chromosome inactivation have been murky, but scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have now taken a major step forward in understanding the process.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 245 Next »