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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.06.2021
Nightside radio could help reveal exoplanet details
Nightside radio could help reveal exoplanet details
Rice team enhances models that will detect magnetospheres in distant solar systems We can't detect them yet, but radio signals from distant solar systems could provide valuable information about the characteristics of their planets. A paper by Rice scientists describes a way to better determine which exoplanets are most likely to produce detectable signals based on magnetosphere activity on exoplanets' previously discounted nightsides.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 21.06.2021
What causes earthquake foreshocks' | Stanford News
What causes earthquake foreshocks’ | Stanford News
Because foreshocks precede larger quakes, they have long presented the tantalizing prospect of warning of potentially damaging earthquakes. But to date, they have only been recognized in hindsight, and scientists for decades have sought to understand the physical processes that drive them. Computer modeling by Stanford geophysicists finds answers in the complex geometry of faults.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.06.2021
'Flashed' nanodiamonds are just a phase
’Flashed’ nanodiamonds are just a phase
Rice produces fluorinated nanodiamond, graphene, concentric carbon via flash Joule heating Diamond may be just a phase carbon goes through when exposed to a flash of heat, but that makes it far easier to obtain. The Rice University lab of chemist James Tour is now able to "evolve" carbon through phases that include valuable nanodiamond by tightly controlling the flash Joule heating process they developed 18 months ago.

Physics - Materials Science - 21.06.2021
Solar energy collectors grown from seeds
Engineers create seeds for growing near-perfect 2D perovskite crystals Rice University engineers have created microscopic seeds for growing remarkably uniform 2D perovskite crystals that are both stable and highly efficient at harvesting electricity from sunlight. Rice University chemical engineering graduate student Siraj Sidhik holds a container of 2D perovskite "seeds” (left) and a smaller vial containing a solution of dissolved seeds that can be used to produce thin films for use in highly efficient optoelectronic devices like high efficiency solar panels.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.06.2021
What the Muon g-2 results mean for how we understand the universe
Experiment opens up field for new physics, say Fermilab, UChicago scientists The news that muons have a little extra wiggle in their step sent word buzzing around the world this spring.  The Muon g-2 experiment hosted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory  announced April 7  that they had measured a particle called a muon behaving slightly differently than predicted in their giant accelerator.

Physics - 18.06.2021
Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world
Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world
Properties of materials are often defined by imperfections in their atomic structure, especially when the material itself is just one atom thick, such as graphene. Researchers at the University of Vienna have now developed a method for controlled creation of such imperfections into graphene at length scales approaching the macroscopic world.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.06.2021
Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals
Tailored laser fields reveal properties of transparent crystals
Research team led by the University of Göttingen investigates surface magnetisation The surface of a material often has properties that are very different from the properties within the material. For example, a non-conducting crystal, which actually exhibits no magnetism, can show magnetisation restricted to its surface because of the way the atoms are arranged there.

Physics - Chemistry - 17.06.2021
Flextronics take another step closer to reality
Flextronics take another step closer to reality
The long-sought future of flexible electronics that are wearable has proven elusive, but Stanford researchers say they have made a breakthrough. Ultrathin, flexible computer circuits have been an engineering goal for years, but technical hurdles have prevented the degree of miniaturization necessary to achieve high performance.

Physics - Chemistry - 17.06.2021
An Atomic Look At Lithium-rich Batteries
Carnegie Mellon University International team of researchers makes groundbreaking observation Batteries have come a long way since Volta first stacked copper and zinc discs together 200 years ago. While the technology has continued to evolve from lead-acid to lithium-ion, many challenges still exist - like achieving higher density and suppressing dendrite growth.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.06.2021
Using DNA For Tiny Tech
Carnegie Mellon University Ph.D. candidate Tito Babatunde and her advisors combine expertise to optimize designs for DNA origami nanostructures When it comes to creating nanotechnology, one cannot simply build it with their hands. Instead, researchers need something nano-sized that is able to self-assemble.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.06.2021
A sharper focus on protein behaviour
A sharper focus on protein behaviour
Scientists have developed a new computational technique that allows them to see in finer detail the way protein molecules behave.

Physics - 16.06.2021
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
Quantum-nonlocality at all speeds
The phenomenon of quantum nonlocality defies our everyday intuition. It shows the strong correlations between several quantum particles some of which change their state instantaneously when the others are measured, regardless of the distance between them. While this phenomenon has been confirmed for slow moving particles, it has been debated whether nonlocality is preserved when particles move very fast at velocities close to the speed of light, and even more so when those velocities are quantum mechanically indefinite.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 16.06.2021
Scrambled magnetic fields and Gamma-Ray Bursts: Space scientists solve a decades-long puzzle
Scrambled magnetic fields and Gamma-Ray Bursts: Space scientists solve a decades-long puzzle
Bath astrophysicists find the magnetic field in Gamma-Ray Bursts is scrambled after the ejected material crashes into, and shocks, the surrounding medium. Last updated on Friday 18 June 2021 An international team of scientists, led by astrophysicists from the University of Bath, has measured the magnetic field in a far-off Gamma-Ray Burst, confirming for the first time a decades-long theoretical prediction - that the magnetic field in these blast waves becomes scrambled after the ejected material crashes into, and shocks, the surrounding medium.

Physics - Life Sciences - 16.06.2021
Graphene ’camera’ captures real-time electrical activity of beating heart
Bay Area scientists have captured the real-time electrical activity of a beating heart, using a sheet of graphene to record an optical image - almost like a video camera - of the faint electric fields generated by the rhythmic firing of the heart's muscle cells. The graphene camera represents a new type of sensor useful for studying cells and tissues that generate electrical voltages, including groups of neurons or cardiac muscle cells.

Physics - 15.06.2021
Let there be light! New tech for night vision
Let there be light! New tech for night vision
Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have developed new technology that allows people to see clearly in the dark, revolutionising night-vision. The first-of-its-kind thin film, described in a new article published in Advanced Photonics , is ultra-compact and one day could work on standard glasses.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.06.2021
Dark matter is slowing the spin of the Milky Way's galactic bar
Dark matter is slowing the spin of the Milky Way’s galactic bar
The spin of the Milky Way's galactic bar, which is made up of billions of clustered stars, has slowed by about a quarter since its formation, according to a new study by UCL and University of Oxford researchers. For 30 years, astrophysicists have predicted such a slowdown, but this is the first time it has been measured.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.06.2021
Oxygen loss saps a lithium-ion battery’s voltage
Measuring the process in unprecedented detail gives them clues to how to minimize the problem and protect battery performance. When lithium ions flow in and out of a battery electrode during charging and discharging, a tiny bit of oxygen seeps out and the battery's voltage - a measure of how much energy it delivers - fades an equally tiny bit.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 11.06.2021
French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet to continue experiments on foams
French ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet to continue experiments on foams
Studying how liquid foams evolve over time is difficult, if not impossible, on Earth because of gravity. The FOAM-C experiment, which began in 2020, was designed to study liquid foams in zero gravity on board the ISS. New samples will be set up by French astronaut Thomas Pesquet on Friday, June 11. The FOAM-C experiment studies the properties of liquid foams in zero gravity.

Physics - Chemistry - 11.06.2021
Rice lab peers inside 2D crystal synthesis
Rice lab peers inside 2D crystal synthesis
Simulations could help molecular engineers enhance creation of semiconducting nanomaterials Scientific studies describing the most basic processes often have the greatest impact in the long run. A new work by Rice University engineers could be one such, and it's a gas, gas, gas for nanomaterials. Rice materials theorist Boris Yakobson , graduate student Jincheng Lei and alumnus Yu Xie of Rice's Brown School of Engineering have unveiled how a popular 2D material, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), flashes into existence during chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

Physics - Life Sciences - 10.06.2021
Australian researchers create quantum microscope that can see the impossible
Australian researchers create quantum microscope that can see the impossible
In a major scientific leap, University of Queensland researchers have created a quantum microscope that can reveal biological structures that would otherwise be impossible to see. This paves the way for applications in biotechnology, and could extend far beyond this into areas ranging from navigation to medical imaging.