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Chemistry - Physics - 07.04.2010
Pull chain polymer solves puzzle of complex molecular packing
Pull chain polymer solves puzzle of complex molecular packing
Sometimes the simplest things hold the key to understanding complex effects. It turns out that a humble metal pull-chain'just like those used on ceiling fans'can be a pretty good model for complex properties of polymer materials. A group of University of Chicago researchers used X-ray microtomography to study what happens when beaded metal chains are packed more and more tightly into a container.

Physics - 06.04.2010
Quantum memory speeds up
Quantum memory speeds up
The researchers achieved a data rate in excess of 1GHz, 100 times what is possible with existing quantum memories, they explain in Nature Photonics . Such a speedy memory would be a key component of any future quantum computing or communications device. The result was achieved by firing pulses of thousands of photons encoded with data into a cesium vapor cell.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.04.2010
Building blocks of the future
Building blocks of the future
Professor Varinder Aggarwal is no ordinary builder. He and his team in the School of Chemistry have just discovered a new technique that could hasten the development of new drugs for today's incurable diseases ' by building complex organic molecules. Complex organic molecules are finding increasing applications in virtually all aspects of our lives, from the pill we take for heart disease and the insecticide used in the production of the food we eat, to the flat screens of mobile phones.

Physics - 06.04.2010
Asteroid to Fly by Within Moon's Orbit Thursday
Asteroid to Fly by Within Moon’s Orbit Thursday
Updated April 08, 2010 With additional observations coming in, scientists at NASA's Near-Earth Object Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. have been able to further refine the trajectory estimate for the orbit of asteroid 2010 GA6. This latest trajectory indicates that the closest approach for asteroid 2010 GA6 will be just slightly beyond the moon's orbit, about 434,000 kilometers (270,000 miles) from Earth.

Physics - 05.04.2010
New study on carbon nanotubes gives hope for medical applications
A team of Swedish and American scientists has shown for the first time that carbon nanotubes can be broken down by an enzyme - myeloperoxidase (MPO) - found in white blood cells. Their discoveries are presented and contradict what was previously believed, that carbon nanotubes are not broken down in the body or in nature.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 04.04.2010
Early Earth absorbed more sunlight – no extreme greenhouse effect needed to keep water wet
Early Earth absorbed more sunlight – no extreme greenhouse effect needed to keep water wet
Researchers have long wondered why water on Earth was not frozen during the early days of the planet, when the sun emanated only 70 to 75 percent as much energy as it does today. Some theorize that high levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the same mechanism cited in global warming today, were key.

Physics - Chemistry - 02.04.2010
MIT makes significant step toward lightweight batteries
MIT makes significant step toward lightweight batteries
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. A team of researchers at MIT has made significant progress on a technology that could lead to batteries with up to three times the energy density of any battery that currently exists. Yang Shao-Horn, an MIT associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and engineering, says that many groups have been pursuing work on lithium-air batteries, a technology that has great potential for achieving great gains in energy density.

Physics - Chemistry - 01.04.2010
Five Faculty Members Named 2010 Sloan Research Fellows
Five Columbia faculty members were named research fellows by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which awards two-year, $50,000 grants to support the work of exceptional young researchers early in their academic careers. They were honored along with 118 scientists, mathematicians and economists. Navin Kartik , an associate professor of economics, does research in the fields of applied microeconomic theory and political economy, primarily using game theory models.

Physics - 31.03.2010
Astronomers See Historical Supernova From a New Angle
Astronomers See Historical Supernova From a New Angle
Cambridge, MA - Since Galileo first pointed a telescope at the sky 400 years ago, a myriad of technological advances have allowed astronomers to look at very faint objects, very distant objects, and even light that's invisible to the human eye. Yet, one aspect usually remains out of reach - the benefit of a 3-D perspective.

Physics - Electroengineering - 30.03.2010
Large Hadron Collider Shatters Particles and World Record
On March 30, physicists in Geneva successfully smashed together two proton beams energized with seven trillion electron volts, breaking the previous world record by 350 percent and setting the stage for new insights into the forces of nature and full dimensions of space. The breakthrough marks an important step forward for Columbia physicists, who have played a significant role in carrying out the experiment.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 30.03.2010
Tiny Gold Particles Help Researchers Find Protein Impostor
March 31, 2010 — Coral Gables — University of Miami assistant professor in the College of Engineering, Na Li and her collaborators have developed a fast, economical and easy method to detect melamine in milk. Melamine is the compound found in contaminated pet food and in tainted dairy products from China in 2007 and 2008 respectively.

Physics - 30.03.2010
Researchers mark Cern milestone
We are delighted to be involved with Cern as the new high-energy run gets under way. The Large Hadron Collider is expected to significantly advance our knowledge of physics and as such represents an enormously important development. The research may shed light on other important unsolved questions in physics.

Physics - 30.03.2010
First LHC discoveries could be made in Bristol
First LHC discoveries could be made in Bristol
Scientists at the world's largest experiment, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will attempt 'first collisions' on Tuesday 30 March, taking us one step close to answering some of the most fundamental questions about our Universe. The detectors are similar to vast digital cameras and can record the results of particle collisions up to 40 million times per second.

Physics - 30.03.2010
First attempt at 7 TeV collisions in the LHC
First attempt at 7 TeV collisions in the LHC
With beams routinely circulating in the Large Hadron Collider at 3.5 TeV, the highest energy yet achieved in a particle accelerator, CERN has set the date for the start of the LHC research programme.

Physics - 30.03.2010
McGill students brace for subatomic collisions
On March 30, 2010, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will begin colliding subatomic particles at previously unattainable energies, and McGill students will be onsite eagerly awaiting the results. The LHC tests will open a new era of discovery about the basic nature of the Universe, and McGill faculty, post-doctorates and graduate students are on-site in Switzerland making important contributions to the research.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 29.03.2010
UCL's role in world's largest scientific experiment
UCL’s role in world’s largest scientific experiment
UCL's Professor John Butterworth, who led the UK development of one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detectors, explains the significance of the record-breaking particle collisions achieved today. Protons collided at seven trillion volts ? the highest energies ever achieved by a man-made particle accelerator ? at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research), which houses the LHC, near Geneva.

Physics - 29.03.2010
Research starts at world's biggest physics experiment
Research starts at world’s biggest physics experiment
Liverpool, UK - 30 March 2010: Scientists have launched physics research at the world¿s largest particle accelerator by successfully achieving proton collisions at 7 trillion electron volts (TeV). The highest energies ever achieved by a man-made particle accelerator mark the start of a two-year campaign that could see scientists make new discoveries about the Universe and answer some of the unresolved questions in physics.

Physics - Electroengineering - 29.03.2010
Graphene photodetectors for high-speed optical communications
Although silicon has dominated solid-state electronics for more than four decades, a variety of other materials are used in photonic devices to expand the wavelength range of operation and improve performance. Electrical engineer Thomas Müller from the Institute of Photonics at the Vienna University of Technology has published the research results in cooperation with the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA.

Chemistry - Physics - 28.03.2010
Molecules arrange themselves into predictable patterns
Molecules arrange themselves into predictable patterns
MIT researchers coaxed tiny, chainlike molecules to arrange themselves into complex patterns, like this one, on a silicon chip. Previously, self-assembling molecules have required some kind of template on the chip surface ? either a trench etched into the chip, or a pattern created through chemical modification.

Physics - Electroengineering - 28.03.2010
New approach to water desalination
New approach to water desalination
A single unit of the new desalination device, fabricated on a layer of silicone. In the Y-shaped channel (in red), seawater enters from the right, and fresh water leaves through the lower channel at left, while concentrated brine leaves through the upper channel. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? A new approach to desalination being developed by researchers at MIT and in Korea could lead to small, portable desalination units that could be powered by solar cells or batteries and could deliver enough fresh water to supply the needs of a family or small village.