news

« BACK

Physics



Results 4761 - 4780 of 4856.


Physics - 30.03.2010
First attempt at 7 TeV collisions in the LHC
First attempt at 7 TeV collisions in the LHC
With beams routinely circulating in the Large Hadron Collider at 3.5 TeV, the highest energy yet achieved in a particle accelerator, CERN has set the date for the start of the LHC research programme.

Physics - 30.03.2010
McGill students brace for subatomic collisions
On March 30, 2010, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will begin colliding subatomic particles at previously unattainable energies, and McGill students will be onsite eagerly awaiting the results. The LHC tests will open a new era of discovery about the basic nature of the Universe, and McGill faculty, post-doctorates and graduate students are on-site in Switzerland making important contributions to the research.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 29.03.2010
UCL's role in world's largest scientific experiment
UCL’s role in world’s largest scientific experiment
UCL's Professor John Butterworth, who led the UK development of one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) detectors, explains the significance of the record-breaking particle collisions achieved today. Protons collided at seven trillion volts ? the highest energies ever achieved by a man-made particle accelerator ? at CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research), which houses the LHC, near Geneva.

Physics - 29.03.2010
Research starts at world's biggest physics experiment
Research starts at world’s biggest physics experiment
Liverpool, UK - 30 March 2010: Scientists have launched physics research at the world¿s largest particle accelerator by successfully achieving proton collisions at 7 trillion electron volts (TeV). The highest energies ever achieved by a man-made particle accelerator mark the start of a two-year campaign that could see scientists make new discoveries about the Universe and answer some of the unresolved questions in physics.

Physics - Electroengineering - 29.03.2010
Graphene photodetectors for high-speed optical communications
Although silicon has dominated solid-state electronics for more than four decades, a variety of other materials are used in photonic devices to expand the wavelength range of operation and improve performance. Electrical engineer Thomas Müller from the Institute of Photonics at the Vienna University of Technology has published the research results in cooperation with the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA.

Chemistry - Physics - 28.03.2010
Molecules arrange themselves into predictable patterns
Molecules arrange themselves into predictable patterns
MIT researchers coaxed tiny, chainlike molecules to arrange themselves into complex patterns, like this one, on a silicon chip. Previously, self-assembling molecules have required some kind of template on the chip surface ? either a trench etched into the chip, or a pattern created through chemical modification.

Physics - Electroengineering - 28.03.2010
New approach to water desalination
New approach to water desalination
A single unit of the new desalination device, fabricated on a layer of silicone. In the Y-shaped channel (in red), seawater enters from the right, and fresh water leaves through the lower channel at left, while concentrated brine leaves through the upper channel. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? A new approach to desalination being developed by researchers at MIT and in Korea could lead to small, portable desalination units that could be powered by solar cells or batteries and could deliver enough fresh water to supply the needs of a family or small village.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.03.2010
Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los Alamos research
In a paper appearing today in the journal Science , Los Alamos researchers report a surprising mechanism that allows nanocrystalline materials to heal themselves after suffering radiation-induced damage. Nanocrystalline materials are those created from nanosized particles, in this case copper particles.

Health - Physics - 25.03.2010
Study provides proof in humans of RNA interference using targeted nanoparticles
Study provides proof in humans of RNA interference using targeted nanoparticles
A team of researchers and clinicians from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the California Institute of Technology has published the first proof that a targeted nanoparticle ? used as an experimental therapeutic and injected directly into a patient's bloodstream ? can navigate into tumors, deliver double-stranded small interfering RNAs and turn off an important cancer gene.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.03.2010
Shells, silicon & neighbourly atoms
Shells, silicon & neighbourly atoms
As Andrew Goodwin of Oxford University's Department of Chemistry explains this irregularity is important: it's what allows shells to grow their curved edges and gives silicon its incredibly useful electronic properties. 'Our main technique for establishing what materials look like on the atomic scale is crystallography ,' Andrew tells me, 'and this relies explicitly on the existence of a repeating arrangement of atoms in order to work.

Physics - 23.03.2010
Seeing is believing
Seeing is believing
Whenever you look up at the stars you are looking back in time, as light from even our closest neighbour, Alpha Centauri, started its journey to Earth more than four years ago. It is a phenomenon that astrophysicists Professor Malcolm Bremer and Dr Ben Maughan from the Department of Physics grapple with daily in their research into deepest space.

Physics - Administration - 22.03.2010
Helium rain on Jupiter explains lack of neon in atmosphere
Helium rain on Jupiter explains lack of neon in atmosphere
A slice through the interior of Jupiter shows the top layers that are depleted of helium and neon, the thin layer where helium drops condense and fall, and the deep interior where helium and neon again mix with metallic hydrogen. ( Burkhard Militzer graphic) On Jupiter, however, UC Berkeley scientists claim that helium rain is the best way to explain the scarcity of neon in the outer layers of the planet, the solar system's largest.

Physics - History / Archeology - 21.03.2010
Astronomers Get Sharpest View Ever of Star Factories in Distant Universe
Astronomers Get Sharpest View Ever of Star Factories in Distant Universe
Cambridge, MA - Astronomers have combined a natural gravitational lens and a sophisticated telescope array to get the sharpest view ever of "star factories" in a galaxy over 10 billion light-years from Earth. They found that the distant galaxy, known as SMM J2135-0102, is making new stars 250 times faster than our Galaxy, the Milky Way.

Health - Physics - 20.03.2010
Caltech-led Team Provides Proof in Humans of RNA Interference Using Targeted Nanoparticles
Caltech-led Team Provides Proof in Humans of RNA Interference Using Targeted Nanoparticles
PASADENA, Calif.—A California Institute of Technology (Caltech)-led team of researchers and clinicians has published the first proof that a targeted nanoparticle—used as an experimental therapeutic and injected directly into a patient's bloodstream—can traffic into tumors, deliver double-stranded small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and turn off an important cancer gene using a mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi).

Physics - 19.03.2010
LHC sets new record to 3.5 TeV
LHC sets new record to 3.5 TeV
At just after 5:20 this morning, two 3.5 TeV proton beams successfully circulated in the Large Hadron Collider for the first time.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 18.03.2010
Clever Materials Just Bend
Clever Materials Just Bend
Those who witnessed the first takeoff of an Airbus A380 Superjumbo from Zurich airport at the end of January know that elegant is not the right word for the aircraft.

Physics - 17.03.2010
Cool Jupiter exoplanet found
Cool Jupiter exoplanet found
The CoRoT satellite has discovered the coolest Jupiter-like exoplanet so far to pass in front of its host star, enabling detailed studies of the planet, a team including Oxford University scientists report. CoRoT-9b has a very slightly eccentric orbit similar to that of Mercury around the Sun and, whilst fairly typical of exoplanets found so far, is special in that it passes in front of its host star once per orbit.

Physics - 17.03.2010
Six years in, Cassini provides insights into Saturn’s rings
From the propeller-shaped disturbances and embedded moonlets in the A ring inward to the nearly transparent D ring and outward to the bright arc circling the faint G ring, NASA's Cassini spacecraft has given astronomers a new look at the complex system of rings circling Saturn. Six years into the mission, rings researchers took a step back this week and reviewed some of its most important findings - and noted a few of the many mysteries that remain - in a paper featured on the cover of the March 18 issue of the journal Science.

Physics - Environment - 16.03.2010
Jupiter's Red Spot has 'warm heart'
The international team, including scientists from Oxford University and NASA JPL , used thermal images from the Very Large Telescope (Chile), Gemini Observatory telescope (Chile) and Japan's Subaru telescope (Hawaii). They report their findings in the journal Icarus . 'This is the first time we can say that there's an intimate link between environmental conditions - temperature, winds, pressure and composition - and the actual colour of the Great Red Spot,' lead author Leigh Fletcher, from Oxford University's Department of Physics, told me.

Physics - 12.03.2010
Princeton scientists say Einstein's theory applies beyond the solar system
Princeton scientists say Einstein's theory applies beyond the solar system
A team led by Princeton University scientists has tested Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity to see if it holds true at cosmic scales. And, after two years of analyzing astronomical data, the scientists have concluded that Einstein's theory, which describes the interplay between gravity, space and time, works as well in vast distances as in more local regions of space.