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Physics - Materials Science - 30.08.2021
Bilayer borophene is a first
Rice theories, Northwestern experiments combine to produce exotic material If one layer of borophene is good, will two be better? Scientists at Rice University and Northwestern University hope so, because they've now made the elusive material. Borophene is a one-atom-thick material made of boron atoms, which mostly fall together in neat triangles when grown in a furnace on a proper substrate.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.08.2021
Atomic snapshots show fast ion migration in ultra-thin clays
Research led by The University of Manchester has found that ions diffuse 10,000 times faster inside atomically thin clays than in bulk clay crystals. Clays are used in a wide variety of membrane applications, so this result offers the potential to achieve vastly improved desalination or fuel cell performance simply by switching to ultra-thin clays when producing the membranes.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.08.2021
Light-matter interactions propel quantum technologies forward
Light-matter interactions propel quantum technologies forward
Physicists at EPFL have found a way to get photons to interact with pairs of atoms for the first time. The breakthrough is important for the field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), a cutting-edge field leading the way to quantum technologies. Image:A collection of atom pairs inside an optical cavity formed by a pair of mirrors facing each other.

Physics - Materials Science - 26.08.2021
LED Material Shines Under Strain
LED Material Shines Under Strain
Berkeley Lab researchers devise a simple tactic to increase the efficiency of LED devices Smartphones, laptops, and lighting applications rely on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to shine bright. But the brighter these LED technologies shine, the more inefficient they become, releasing more energy as heat instead of light.

Computer Science - Physics - 25.08.2021
Optical technology can slash the energy required by AI
Optical technology can slash the energy required by AI
EPFL engineers are pioneering an energy-saving technology that uses fiber optics to boost the performance of supercomputers. Optical technology is used for transmitting, storing, displaying and identifying data. It provides the processing speed that data centers need by offering efficient means for communication and analysis operations.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.08.2021
Scientists report breakthrough in actinide metal-metal bonding
Scientists from The University of Manchester have managed to successfully make actinide metals form molecular actinide-actinide bonds for the first time, opening up a new field of scientific study in materials research. Reported in the journal Nature , a group of scientists from Manchester and Stuttgart universities have successfully prepared and characterised long-sought actinide-actinide bonding in an isolable compound.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 19.08.2021
Researchers from IRSOL and IAC solve twenty-year-old paradox in solar physics
Researchers from IRSOL and IAC solve twenty-year-old paradox in solar physics
In 1998, the journal Nature published a seminal letter concluding that a mysterious signal, which had been recently discovered analysing the polarization of sunlight, implies that the solar chromosphere (a very important layer of the solar atmosphere) is practically unmagnetised, in sharp contradiction with common wisdom.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.08.2021
This Exotic Particle Had an Out-of-Body Experience; These Scientists Took a Picture of It
This Exotic Particle Had an Out-of-Body Experience; These Scientists Took a Picture of It
An unexpected finding by scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley could advance quantum computers and high-temperature superconductors Scientists have taken the clearest picture yet of electronic particles that make up a mysterious magnetic state called a quantum spin liquid (QSL). The achievement could facilitate the development of superfast quantum computers and energy-efficient superconductors.

Physics - 17.08.2021
Scientific reasoning requires the irrationality of intuition
SUMMER SERIE: HOW SCIENCE WORKS Science is based on coherent reasoning, while intuition follows a more disjointed path. But scientific research couldn't succeed if scientists didn't listen to their gut feelings every once in a while. Science by definition relies on logic, reasoning and rigor. But we've all heard about Archimedes' famous Eureka! moment when, while taking a bath, he suddenly understood what came to be known as Archimedes' principle.

Life Sciences - Physics - 16.08.2021
Bacterial toxin blinds algae
Bacterial toxin blinds algae
Jena research team discovers natural product from soil bacteria that kills algae University of Jena researchers have discovered a bacterial toxin that destroys the colour pigments in the eyespot of the single-cell green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Together with another toxic substance, the bacteria of the species Pseudomonas protegens not only disorientate and immobilise the green algae, but condemn them to a certain death.

Life Sciences - Physics - 16.08.2021
An artificial ionic neuron for tomorrow's electronic memories
An artificial ionic neuron for tomorrow’s electronic memories
Artificial intelligence surpasses the human brain only at the cost of consuming tens of thousands of times more energy. A major difference between the brain and electronic systems is that neurons use ions, not electrons, to carry information. French scientists have designed theoretical artificial neurons with ions to carry the information.

Life Sciences - Physics - 13.08.2021
U-M researchers solve structure of BRCA2 protein complex important in DNA repair
U-M researchers solve structure of BRCA2 protein complex important in DNA repair
The initials BRCA2 may be best known for a gene associated with many cases of breast cancer, and the protein encoded by the BRCA2 gene is critical to repairing breaks in DNA. The breakdown of this interaction is a hallmark of many cancers. Now, U-M scientists have determined the structure of a complex of two proteins-BRCA2 together with MEILB2-that allows repairs to happen efficiently in cells undergoing cell-splitting, called meiosis.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.08.2021
Modeling uncovers an 'atomic waltz' for atom manipulation
Modeling uncovers an ’atomic waltz’ for atom manipulation
Researchers at the University of Vienna's Faculty of Physics in collaboration with colleagues from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA have uncovered a non-destructive mechanism to manipulate donor impurities within silicon using focused electron irradiation. In this novel indirect exchange process not one but two neighbouring silicon atoms are involved in a coordinated atomic "waltz", which may open a path for the fabrication of solid-state qubits.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.08.2021
’Cool’ kids in the cosmos may not be so unique
Rice models infer small stars share similar dynamics to our sun, key to planet habitability Stars scattered throughout the cosmos look different, but they may be more alike than once thought, according to Rice researchers. New modeling work by Rice scientists shows that "cool” stars like the sun share the dynamic surface behaviors that influence their energetic and magnetic environments.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.08.2021
Qubits Under Pressure
Qubits Under Pressure
A new type of atomic sensor made of boron nitride is presented by researchers in "Nature Communications". The sensor is based on a qubit in the crystal lattice and is superior to comparable sensors. An artificially created spin defect (qubit) in a crystal lattice of boron nitride is suitable as a sensor enabling the measurement of different changes in its local environment.

Physics - 06.08.2021
Emergent magnetic monopoles controlled at room temperature
Emergent magnetic monopoles controlled at room temperature
Three dimensional (3D) nano-network promise a new era in modern solid state physics with numerous applications in photonics, bio-medicine, and spintronics. The realization of 3D magnetic nano-architectures could enable ultra-fast and low-energy data storage devices. Due to competing magnetic interactions in these systems magnetic charges or magnetic monopoles can emerge, which can be utilized as mobile, binary information carriers.

Physics - Chemistry - 05.08.2021
A promising breakthrough: Nanocrystals made of amalgam
A promising breakthrough: Nanocrystals made of amalgam
Researchers at ETH have managed to produce nanocrystals made of two different metals using an amalgamation process whereby a liquid metal penetrates a solid one. This new and surprisingly intuitive technique makes it possible to produce a vast array of intermetallic nanocrystals with tailored properties for diverse applications. Nanocrystals are nanometre-sized spheres consisting of regularly arranged atoms.

Physics - Computer Science - 02.08.2021
New viable means of storing information for quantum technologies?
New viable means of storing information for quantum technologies?
Quantum information could be behind the next technological revolution. By analogy with the bit in classical computing, the qubit is the basic element of quantum computing. However, demonstrating the existence of this information storage unit and using it remains complex, and hence limited.

Physics - 30.07.2021
Chasing neutrinos in Greenland
VUB leads pioneering project to search for cosmic particles from space with radio antennas Researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) are part of a unique installation on the Greenland ice cap that will try to observe almost elusive particles from space. The Radio Neutrino Observatory Greenland (RNO-G) is a pioneering project that uses a new method to detect cosmic neutrinos with very high energy using radio antennas.

Physics - Materials Science - 30.07.2021
Science with teeth: Researchers use X-rays to find rare mineral in mollusk tooth
Rare mineral used to create a new ink for 3D printing of prosthetics and devices for space travel A rare mineral inside the teeth of a large mollusk found along rocky coastlines led to a bio-inspired ink for 3D printing and may also one day be used in the emerging field of soft robotics, according to researchers who made the discovery while working at Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national lab which is affiliated with the University of Chicago.