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Physics - 08.06.2021
Subatomic particle seen changing to antiparticle and back for the first time
Subatomic particle seen changing to antiparticle and back for the first time
Physicists have proved that a subatomic particle can switch into its antiparticle alter-ego and back again, in a new discovery revealed today. An extraordinarily precise measurement made by Oxford researchers using the LHCb experiment at CERN has provided the first evidence that charm mesons can change into their antiparticle and back again.

Physics - 08.06.2021
X-ray flash imaging of laser-induced bubbles and shockwaves in water
X-ray flash imaging of laser-induced bubbles and shockwaves in water
Holographic 'movie' of bubbles and high-pressure shockwave created by research team led by Göttingen University Everyone is familiar with tiny gas bubbles gently rising up in sparkling water. But the bubbles that were created by intense focused lasers in this experiment were ten times smaller and contained water vapour at a pressure around a hundred thousand times higher.

Computer Science - Physics - 08.06.2021
Early endeavours on the path to reliable quantum machine learning
Early endeavours on the path to reliable quantum machine learning
The future quantum computers should be capable of super-fast and reliable computation. Today, this is still a major challenge. Now, computer scientists led by ETH Zurich conduct an early exploration for reliable quantum machine learning. Anyone who collects mushrooms knows that it is better to keep the poisonous and the non-poisonous ones apart.

Health - Physics - 08.06.2021
Using light to monitor cancer
Using light to monitor cancer
Researchers at EPFL have developed a technology based on nanophotonics and data science to detect and monitor cancer biomarkers at an early stage. Their research is published. Medical doctors examine body fluids of their patients, such as blood, urine, saliva, or nasal swabs, for diagnostics. This is because substances in such biofluids may provide vital information about one's health state.

Physics - 07.06.2021
Atom swapping could lead to ultra-bright, flexible next generation LEDs
Atom swapping could lead to ultra-bright, flexible next generation LEDs
An international group of researchers has developed a new technique that could be used to make more efficient low-cost light-emitting materials that are flexible and can be printed using ink-jet techniques. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge and the Technical University of Munich, found that by swapping one out of every one thousand atoms of one material for another, they were able to triple the luminescence of a new material class of light emitters known as halide perovskites.

Physics - Campus - 07.06.2021
’Surfing’ particles: Physicists solve a mystery surrounding aurora borealis
The spectacularly colorful aurora borealis — or northern lights — that fill s the sky in high-latitude regions ha s fascinated people for thousands of years. Now, a team of scientists has resolved one of the final mysteries surrounding its origin. Scientists know that electrons and other energized particles that emanate from the sun as part of the "solar wind" speed down Earth's magnetic field lines and into the upper atmosphere, where they collide with oxygen and nitrogen molecules, kicking them into an excited state.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 07.06.2021
CIBER-2 Takes Its First Flight
The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment-2 (CIBER-2) took its first flight late on June 6 Pacific Time, soaring into space for a short time aboard a NASA rocket. The experiment is measuring a mysterious glow of infrared light that fills our skies called the cosmic infrared background. The origins of CIBER go back to 2007, when NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope made measurements of the cosmic infrared background, which appears as a splotchy pattern on the sky.

Physics - Electroengineering - 04.06.2021
Magnetism Drives Metals to Insulators in New Experiment
Like all metals, silver, copper, and gold are conductors. Electrons flow across them, carrying heat and electricity. While gold is a good conductor under any conditions, some materials have the property of behaving like metal conductors only if temperatures are high enough; at low temperatures, they act like insulators and do not do a good job of carrying electricity.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.06.2021
Nanoengineering integrates crystals that don't usually get along
Nanoengineering integrates crystals that don’t usually get along
A team of computational and experimental engineers demonstrate a blueprint for building materials with new properties from nanocrystals A blueprint for designing new materials using difficult combinations of nanocrystals has been developed by a team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 01.06.2021
Turbulence in interstellar gas clouds reveals multi-fractal structures
Turbulence in interstellar gas clouds reveals multi-fractal structures
The German-French Cooperation Programme GENESIS describes the complex structure of the interstellar medium using a new mathematical method / The dispersion of interstellar turbulence in gas clouds before star formation unfolds in a cosmically small space In interstellar dust clouds, turbulence must first dissipate before a star can form through gravity.

Life Sciences - Physics - 01.06.2021
Mass of human chromosomes measured for the first time
The mass of human chromosomes, which contain the instructions for life in nearly every cell of our bodies, has been measured with X-rays for the first time in a new study led by UCL researchers. For the study, published in Chromosome Research , researchers used a powerful X-ray beam at the UK's national synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, to determine the number of electrons in a spread of 46 chromosomes which they used to calculate mass.

Physics - 01.06.2021
Light-Shrinking Material Lets Ordinary Microscope See in Super Resolution
Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a technology that improves the resolution of an ordinary light microscope so that it can be used to directly observe finer structures and details in living cells. The technology turns a conventional light microscope into what's called a super-resolution microscope.

Physics - Chemistry - 01.06.2021
Green light on gold atoms
Green light on gold atoms
Scientists at EPFL discover that laser-driven rearrangement of just a few gold atoms inside nanoscale antennas can be observed by the naked eye. Image: Plasmonic nano-antennas fabricated at EPFL: gold nanoparticles are deposited on a gold film covered with a layer of molecules. Light emission from defects near the film surface is strongly enhanced by the antenna effect, enabling its detection. Credit: Nicolas Antille (www.nicolasantille.com).

Physics - Materials Science - 01.06.2021
Why deep freezing iron-based materials makes them both magnetic and superconducting
Why deep freezing iron-based materials makes them both magnetic and superconducting
Physicists at Bath have uncovered a new mechanism for enabling magnetism and superconductivity to co-exist in the same material. Last updated on Thursday 3 June 2021 Physicists at the University of Bath, in collaboration with researchers from the USA, have uncovered a new mechanism for enabling magnetism and superconductivity to co-exist in the same material.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.05.2021
Looking deep into the universe
Looking deep into the universe
How is matter distributed within our universe? And what is the mysterious substance known as dark energy made of? HIRAX, a new large telescope array comprising hundreds of small radio telescopes, should provide some answers. Among those instrumental in developing the system are physicists from ETH Zurich.

Life Sciences - Physics - 28.05.2021
A deep dive into the brain
A deep dive into the brain
Researchers from ETH Zurich and University of Zurich have developed a new microscopy technique that lights up the brain with high resolution imagery. This allows neuroscientists to study brain functions and ailments more closely and non-invasively.   The way the human brain works remains, to a great extent, a topic of controversy.

Physics - Materials Science - 28.05.2021
Breakthrough in 3D magnetic nanostructures could transform modern-day computing
Breakthrough in 3D magnetic nanostructures could transform modern-day computing
Scientists have taken a step towards the creation of powerful devices that harness magnetic charge by creating the first ever three-dimensional replica of a material known as a 'spin-ice'. Spin ice materials are extremely unusual as they possess so-called defects which behave as the single pole of a magnet.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.05.2021
Thin, Large-Area Device Converts Infrared Light into Images
Seeing through smog and fog. Mapping out a person's blood vessels while monitoring heart rate at the same time—without touching the person's skin. Seeing through silicon wafers to inspect the quality and composition of electronic boards. These are just some of the capabilities of a new infrared imager developed by a team of researchers led by electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.05.2021
It takes some heat to form ice
It takes some heat to form ice
Researchers from TU Graz in Austria and the Universities of Cambridge and Surrey succeeded to track down the first step in ice formation at a surface, revealing that additional energy is needed for water before ice can start to form. Picture material for download at the end of the message Water freezes and turns to ice when brought in contact with a cold surface - a well-known fact.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.05.2021
Shiny mega-crystals that build themselves
Shiny mega-crystals that build themselves
An international team led by Empa and ETH Zurich researchers is playing with shape-engineered nanoscale building blocks that are up to 100-times larger than atoms and ions. And although these nano "Lego bricks" interact with each other with forces vastly different and much weaker than those holding atoms and ions together, they form crystals all by themselves, the structures of which resemble the ones of natural minerals.