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Psychology - Health - 08.02.2021
Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. Patients with depression or psychosis rarely experience symptoms of purely one or the other illness. Historically, this has meant that mental health clinicians give a diagnosis of a 'primary' illness, but with secondary symptoms.

Psychology - Computer Science - 05.02.2021
Tweets of fear used to spread malicious viruses online
Cybercriminals are preying on emotions of fear to spread dangerous viruses and spyware across Twitter, new research has revealed. Scientists from Cardiff University have shown, for the first time, that tweets containing malicious links are more likely to contain negative emotions, and that it is the content of the tweet that increases the likelihood of it being liked and shared, as opposed to the number of followers of the poster.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 03.02.2021
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching children in a way that encourages them to empathise with others measurably improves their creativity, and could potentially lead to several other beneficial learning outcomes, new research suggests. We clearly awakened something in these pupils by encouraging them to think about the thoughts and feelings of others Helen Demetriou The findings are from a year-long University of Cambridge study with Design and Technology (D&T) year 9 pupils (ages 13 to 14) at two inner London schools.

Health - Psychology - 03.02.2021
New chance to share experiences of living during a pandemic
As the pandemic continues to dominate our lives, people in Wales are being asked to share their experiences as part of ongoing research into how the population is coping with COVID-19. Wales Wellbeing, led by Cardiff University's Professor Robert Snowden and Swansea University's Professor Nicola Gray, was launched last June to examine the impact of COVID-19 on mental health and emotional wellbeing.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 26.01.2021
What is Personality?
Do you value courage and bravery or intelligence and learning? Your answer may indicate whether you end up in Gryffindor or Ravenclaw, according to a Harry Potter-themed personality test. Other tests purport to tell you which breed of dog your personality most resembles; are you a protective chow chow or a calm and comforting greyhound? Myriad personality tests, both tongue-in-cheek and serious, including the popular Myers-Briggs test that evaluates traits like introversion versus extroversion, group us into personality types.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 25.01.2021
Two key factors facilitate the experience of spirits or gods
Two key factors facilitate the experience of spirits or gods
Stanford researchers find both socio-cultural and personal characteristics influence how individuals experience the presence of gods and spirits. Human history has been shaped by vivid experiences of gods and spirits, from Augustine's conversion to Christianity after hearing a disembodied voice to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s decision, after hearing God's voice, to move ahead with the Montgomery bus boycotts.

Health - Psychology - 22.01.2021
Mental health of intensive care staff should be immediate priority
Nearly half of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) staff are likely to meet the threshold for PTSD, severe anxiety or problem drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study led by UCL and King's College London researchers. The study, published in Occupational Medicine , shows the stark impact of working in critical care during the COVID-10 pandemic.

Psychology - 21.01.2021
Why some people report ’hearing the dead’
Spiritualist mediums might be more prone to immersive mental activities and unusual auditory experiences early in life, our researchers have found. Their findings could explain why some people and not others say they receive communications from 'the dead' and eventually adopt spiritualist beliefs. Spiritualism is a religious movement based on the idea that human souls continue to exist after death and communicate with the living through a medium or psychic.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 21.01.2021
Teenagers catch moods and negative moods are more contagious
Mental health and emotional wellbeing among young people could be better understood by findings in a recently published pape r from the Universities of Birmingham and Oxford, which reveal that teenagers catch moods from friends and bad moods are more contagious than good ones. The authors, Dr Stephanie Burnett Heyes , of the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology and Dr Per Block , of Oxford's Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science , hope the ground-breaking study could lead to improved understanding of emotional wellbeing.

Psychology - 20.01.2021
"Smiling Eyes" Likely Don’t Signify True Happiness After All
Carnegie Mellon study questions influential Duchenne smile hypothesis A smile that lifts the cheeks and crinkles the eyes is thought by many to be truly genuine. But new research at Carnegie Mellon University casts doubt on whether this joyful facial expression necessarily tells others how a person really feels inside.

Health - Psychology - 18.01.2021
Mental health impact of Covid-19 on hospital healthcare workers
Mental health impact of Covid-19 on hospital healthcare workers
Hospital healthcare workers reported higher rates of clinically significant mental health symptoms following the initial Covid-19 pandemic peak in the UK, new research led by the University of Birmingham has revealed. A study , published in BJPsych Open, found around a third of hospital healthcare workers reported clinically significant symptoms of anxiety (34.3%) and depression (31.2%), while almost a quarter (24.5%) reported clinically significant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.

Health - Psychology - 18.01.2021
Back up words with actions and pay more than lip service to the importance of doctor’s mental health
A study based on responses of doctors in frontline healthcare across the UK and Ireland highlights the mental health toll COVID-19 has placed on them. Last updated on Monday 18 January 2021 New research findings suggest that during the first wave of the pandemic in 2020 nearly half (45%) of doctors working in emergency medicine, intensive care and anaesthetics reported psychological distress - substantially higher than figures for the general population.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 18.01.2021
Where do our minds wander? Brain waves can point the way
Anyone who has tried and failed to meditate knows that our minds are rarely still. But where do they roam? New research led by UC Berkeley has come up with a way to track the flow of our internal thought processes and signal whether our minds are focused, fixated or wandering. Using an electroencephalogram (EEG) to measure brain activity while people performed mundane attention tasks, researchers identified brain signals that reveal when the mind is not focused on the task at hand or aimlessly wandering, especially after concentrating on an assignment.

Health - Psychology - 13.01.2021
High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems later in life
High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems later in life
Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 13.01.2021
Smacking young children has long-lasting effects
Children who have adverse experiences such as being smacked at the age of three are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and have behavioural problems through to age 14, according to a study led by UCL researchers. Children who have adverse experiences such as being smacked at the age of three are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and have behavioural problems through to age 14, according to a study led by UCL researchers.

Health - Psychology - 07.01.2021
How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
The Covid-19 pandemic is impacting people's mental health. But what helps and hinders people in getting through a lockdown? A new study led by researchers at the University of Basel addressed this question using data from 78 countries across the world. The results hint at the pivots and hinges on which the individual's psyche rests in the pandemic.

Health - Psychology - 21.12.2020
One in three adults drank more alcohol during first lockdown
One in three adults drank more alcohol during first lockdown
COVID-19 and lockdown measures drove some individuals more than others to use alcohol to cope with stress, a new study has revealed. While overall alcohol consumption appeared to fall, a study published in  BMJ Open  found that more than one in three adults (36%) increased their consumption during the first lockdown.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2020
Emotional headlines have an impact regardless of the credibility of the source
New HU study on the influence of "fake news" on the brain Neurocognitive studies by researchers at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU) show that headlines with emotional content influence our judgments about other people even when we consider the media source to be untrustworthy. Rumours, half-truths and misinformation can be consumed and shared non-stop online and have an enormous reach.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 16.12.2020
The 16 facial expressions most common to emotional situations worldwide
Facial expressions of emotion transcend geography and culture, new study shows. (Image by Alan Cowen) Whether at a birthday party in Brazil, a funeral in Kenya or protests in Hong Kong, humans all use variations of the same facial expressions in similar social contexts, such as smiles, frowns, grimaces and scowls, a new UC Berkeley study shows.

Psychology - 15.12.2020
Literature and tolerance in the Victorian era
The research being carried out by Dr. Nina Engelhardt fills a gap in our understanding of tolerance as well as in (cognitive) literature, and her project has led to her being included in the Baden-Württemberg Foundation's Elite Program for postdocs. In public discourse, the word "tolerance" is often defined as respect, acceptance and recognition of other cultures.