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Social Sciences - Health - 08.02.2013
Number of paracetamol overdose deaths reduced by smaller pack sizes
Number of paracetamol overdose deaths reduced by smaller pack sizes
The study, by researchers from Oxford University and The University of Manchester, found the number of deaths reduced following new legislation introduced by the Government in 1998 to restrict pack sizes to 32 tablets at pharmacies and 16 for non-pharmacy sales. Published in the British Medical Journal today (Friday 8 February), the study analysed data from 1993-2009, comparing the number of deaths before and after the legislation was introduced.

Social Sciences - Environment - 06.02.2013
Environmental factors determine whether immigrants are accepted by cooperatively breeding animals
Environmental factors determine whether immigrants are accepted by cooperatively breeding animals
—Dr Markus Z?ttl of the University of Cambridge Cichlid fish are more likely to accept immigrants into their group when they are under threat from predators and need reinforcements, new research shows. The researcher suggests that there are parallels between cooperatively breeding fish's and humans' regulation of immigrants.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 30.01.2013
Aztec Conquest Altered Genetics among Early Mexico Inhabitants, New DNA Study Shows
AUSTIN, Texas — For centuries, the fate of the original Otomí inhabitants of Xaltocan, the capital of a pre-Aztec Mexican city-state, has remained unknown. Researchers have long wondered whether they assimilated with the Aztecs or abandoned the town altogether. According to new anthropological research from The University of Texas at Austin, Wichita State University and Washington State University, the answers may lie in DNA.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 30.01.2013
Can you feel my pain? Middle-aged women sure can
ANN ARBOR-Looking for someone to feel your pain? Talk to a woman in her 50s. According to a new study of more than 75,000 adults, women in that age group are more empathic than men of the same age and than younger or older people. "Overall, late middle-aged adults were higher in both of the aspects of empathy that we measured," said Sara Konrath, assistant research professor at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research and co-author of an article on age and empathy forthcoming in the Journals of Gerontology: Psychological and Social Sciences.

Social Sciences - Media - 30.01.2013
Why some immigrants get citizenship
Study: Country of origin a 'massive disadvantage' for some immigrants, regardless of qualifications. For immigrants, the path to citizenship in many countries is filled with hurdles: finding a job, learning the language, passing exams. But for some people, the biggest obstacle of all may be one they cannot help: their country of origin.

Social Sciences - 29.01.2013
More sex for married couples with traditional divisions of housework
Married men and women who divide household chores in traditional ways report having more sex than couples who share so-called men's and women's work, according to a new study co-authored by sociologists at the University of Washington. Other studies have found that husbands got more sex if they did more housework, implying that sex was in exchange for housework.

Social Sciences - 15.01.2013
Violent video games may intensify anti-Arab stereotypes
ANN ARBOR-Playing violent video games about terrorism strengthens negative stereotypes about Arabs, even when Arabs are not portrayed in the games. That is one of the findings of an innovative new study in the January issue of Psychology of Violence, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Psychological Association.

Social Sciences - 15.01.2013
Violent video games intensify anti-Arab stereotypes
ANN ARBOR-Playing violent video games about terrorism strengthens negative stereotypes about Arabs, even when Arabs are not portrayed in the games. That is one of the findings of an innovative new study in the January issue of Psychology of Violence, a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Psychological Association.

Social Sciences - 07.01.2013
New ¤675,000 study will examine online abuse in teenage relationships
New ¤675,000 study will examine online abuse in teenage relationships
The role of online technology in instigating and maintaining control and violence in young people's intimate relationships will be examined in a new study led by researchers at the University of Bristol. Instant messaging and social networking sites are some of the most popular ways young people communicate today.

Social Sciences - Health - 21.12.2012
New research findings on causes of suicide
A new research report sheds fresh light on the processes in the brain that can lead to suicide. In tests on patients who have previously tried to take their own lives, researchers have measured high levels of quinolinic acid, a substance that strengthens glutamate signalling in the brain. Quinolinic acid is formed in the brain as a by-product of inflammation.

Social Sciences - Health - 20.12.2012
Child abuse risks: parent's addiction, unemployment and divorce
Adults whose parents struggled with addiction, unemployment and divorce are 10 times more likely to have been victims of childhood physical abuse, says a new study from the University of Toronto. More than one-third of adults who grew up in homes where all three risk factors were present reported they had been physically abused by someone close to them while under the age of 18 and still living at home, said researchers at U of T's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work.

Social Sciences - Health - 10.12.2012
Teen dating violence linked to long-term harmful effects
Teen dating violence linked to long-term harmful effects
Teenagers in physically or psychologically aggressive dating relationships are more than twice as likely to repeat such damaging relationships as adults and report increased substance use and suicidal feelings years later, compared with teens with healthy dating experiences, reports a new Cornell study.

Social Sciences - 05.12.2012
Media coverage, attitudes about Latinos drive immigration debate
ANN ARBOR-The debate about immigration policies is shaped primarily by how one group feels about another-not solely based on economic concerns, according to a new University of Michigan study. White Americans' feelings about Latinos, but not other groups, powerfully drive their support or opposition to immigration policies.

Social Sciences - 04.12.2012
Self-injury in young people is a gateway to suicide
Self-injury in young people is a gateway to suicide
Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) - deliberately harming one's body through such acts as cutting, burning or biting - is a primary risk factor for future suicide in teens and young adults, finds a new longitudinal study of college students led by a Cornell mental health researcher. The paper, published online Dec.

Civil Engineering - Social Sciences - 14.11.2012
The hidden consequences of helping rural communities in Africa
The hidden consequences of helping rural communities in Africa
Improving water supplies in rural African villages may have negative knock-on effects and contribute to increased poverty, new research published today [14 November] has found. Rural development initiatives across the developing world are designed to improve community wellbeing and livelihoods but a study of Ethiopian villages by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Addis Ababa in Africa has shown that this can lead to unforeseen consequences caused by an increase in the birth rate in the absence of family planning.

Economics / Business - Social Sciences - 01.11.2012
Millionaire migration a myth, say researchers at Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Millionaire migration a myth, say researchers at Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Stanford Report, November 2, 2012 Anti-tax advocates argue that millionaires will flee from states that raise taxes on their highest earners. But a study by Stanford and Princeton researchers shows no evidence of millionaire migration in response to recent tax rate changes. Other factors, such as personal and business, seem to weigh more heavily in deciding where to live.

Health - Social Sciences - 16.10.2012
Marriage, education can help improve well-being of adults abused as children
Researchers investigating the long-term consequences of child abuse have identified some protective factors that can improve the health of victims during their adulthood. Men and women in their 30s who had been abused or neglected as children reported worse mental and physical health than their non-abused peers.

Social Sciences - 01.10.2012
Obama faces 20 percent handicap because of race bias among voters lacking strong party preferences
Posted under: News Releases , Politics and Government , Research , Social Science An online study of eligible voters around the country revealed that the preference for whites over blacks is the strongest in the least politically-partisan voters. Among these voters, race biases against Barack Obama could produce as much as a 20 percent gap in the popular vote in a contest that would otherwise be equal.

Social Sciences - 06.09.2012
More grandparents fill caregiver role
Grandparents, an increasingly important source of child care in the United States, vary greatly in the kind of care they provide, depending on their age, resources, and the needs of their children, research at the University of Chicago shows. A new UChicago study, based on a National Institute on Aging survey, shows that 60 percent of grandparents provided some care for their grandchildren during a 10-year period, and 70 percent of those who did provided care for two years or more.

Social Sciences - 21.08.2012
Impact on Palestinian and Israeli children
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-Children exposed to ethnic and political violence in the Middle East are more aggressive than other children, a new study shows. And the younger children are, the more strongly they are affected, in a "chain of violence" that goes from political and ethnic strife, to violence in communities, schools, and families, and ends with their own aggressive behavior.