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Results 1721 - 1740 of 1804.


Health - Social Sciences - 05.04.2012
Risk of suicide and fatal heart attack immediately following a cancer diagnosis
Risk of suicide and fatal heart attack immediately following a cancer diagnosis
People who are diagnosed with cancer have a markedly increased risk of suicide and cardiovascular death during the period immediately after being given the diagnosis. This has been shown in a new study from Karolinska Institutet, published in the prestigious scientific journal The New England Journal of Medicine.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.03.2012
Testosterone low, but responsive to competition, in Amazonian tribe -- with slideshow
It's a rough life for the Tsimane, an isolated indigenous group in Bolivia. They make a living by hunting and foraging in forests, fishing in streams and clearing land by hand to grow crops. Their rugged lifestyle might imply that Tsimane men have elevated testosterone to maintain the physical activity required to survive each day.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 13.03.2012
Research suggests suicide rates higher in protestant areas than catholic
Research from the University of Warwick suggests suicide rates are much higher in protestant areas than catholic areas. Professor Sascha Becker from the University of Warwick's Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Society (CAGE) has published his latest paper Knocking on Heaven's Door? Protestantism and Suicide.

Social Sciences - 09.03.2012
Far right supporters - violence is largely inevitable
Far right supporters in the UK believe violent conflict between different religious, racial and ethnic groups is largely inevitable, according to a new survey on political extremism. From Voting to Violence? Far Right Extremism in Britain examines the beliefs of those identifying themselves as members of the British National Party, the English Defence League or the UK Independence Party.

Social Sciences - Health - 29.02.2012
Bullies and victims three times more likely to have suicidal thoughts by age 11
Children involved in bullying - as both a victim and a bully - are three times more likely to have suicidal thoughts by the time they reach 11 years old, according to research from the University of Warwick. In a paper published in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the researchers found children who are both victims and bullies ('bully-victims'), are at highly increased risk of considering suicide, or have planned and engaged in suicidal or self-harming behaviour by 11-12 years of age.

Social Sciences - Environment - 13.02.2012
China's pollution related to e-cars may be more harmful than gasoline cars
China's pollution related to e-cars may be more harmful than gasoline cars
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (02/13/2012) —Electric cars have been heralded as environmentally friendly, but new findings from an international research team suggest that electric cars in China have an overall impact on pollution that could be more harmful to health than gasoline vehicles. University of Minnesota civil engineering assistant professor Julian Marshall and researcher Matthew Bechle are part of an international team studying the issue.

Social Sciences - Health - 09.02.2012
Gap between Scottish and English suicide rates widens
A new study has revealed the widening gap in suicide rates between Scotland and England & Wales due to a large extent to the number of young Scottish men taking their lives. The research, carried out by the Universities of Manchester and Edinburgh and the Medical Research Council Social and Public Health Sciences Unit in Glasgow, examined suicide rates north and south of the border between 1960 and 2008.

Social Sciences - Health - 02.02.2012
Better NHS services reduce suicide rates
Researchers at The University of Manchester have for the first time shown a positive link between improvements in mental health services and a reduction in suicide rates. Their research is published in The Lancet today (Thursday) in a study by the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness, based at the University's Centre for Mental Health and Risk.

Health - Social Sciences - 25.01.2012
Dawn of Social Networks
Ancient humans may not have had the luxury of updating their Facebook status, but social networks were nevertheless an essential component of their lives, a new study suggests. The study's findings describe elements of social network structures that may have been present early in human history, suggesting how our ancestors may have formed ties with both kin and non-kin based on shared attributes, including the tendency to cooperate.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 23.01.2012
Why men ’exhibit warrior tendencies’
Why men ’exhibit warrior tendencies’
A new study has looked into how our psychology concerning war and conflict may have been shaped by our evolutionary past. Following a review of current academic literature by psychologists, biologists and anthropologists, the study concludes that men are biologically programmed to be warriors because of our deep ancestral history of inter-tribal war and conflict.

Social Sciences - 02.12.2011
Migration and regional attitudes in the UK
Migration and regional attitudes in the UK
Londoners and Scots are less likely to support reductions to immigration than people in the Midlands and Wales, new research by Oxford University's Migration Observatory shows. In their recent public opinion survey undertaken with Ipsos MORI, the Observatory highlights regional findings which suggest that there may not be a direct link between the scale of immigration to an area and public support for cuts to immigration.

Social Sciences - Health - 28.11.2011
40 percent of youths attempting suicide make first attempt before high school
40 percent of youths attempting suicide make first attempt before high school
Thoughts about killing oneself and engaging in suicidal behavior may begin much younger than previously thought. While about one of nine youths attempt suicide by the time they graduate from high school, new findings reveal that a significant proportion make their first suicide attempt in elementary or middle school.

Social Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.11.2011
Size matters?
If you like tofu, tempeh, edamame or miso soup, you're a fan of soybeans. But the significance of this legume goes far beyond a few culinary treats - soybeans rank seventh among world crops for tonnage harvested. Now, a new study led by researchers at the University of Toronto Mississauga and the University of Oregon gets at the root of soybean domestication in Asia, and challenges many of the long-held beliefs about when and where humans first began to domesticate this plant — and specifically, increase its seed size.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 02.11.2011
Half of British workforce ill-treated
Half of British workforce ill-treated
One million Britons experienced workplace violence in the last two years, while millions more were subjected to intimidation, humiliation and rudeness, new research has shown. Surprisingly, managers and professionals in well-paid full-time jobs are among the groups most at risk. The study also shows that conventional employment policies are failing to deal with workplace ill-treatment.

Social Sciences - 01.11.2011
Americans' circle of confidantes has shrunk to two people
Americans’ circle of confidantes has shrunk to two people
Although the average Facebook user may gave some 130 "friends," in reality, Americans have, on average, slightly more than two confidantes, down from three 25 years ago, but the size of this social network has stabilized since 2004, finds a new Cornell study. Although this shrinking social network "makes us potentially more vulnerable," said Matthew Brashears, assistant professor of sociology, the good news is that "we're not as socially isolated as scholars had feared." Brashears' study is published online and in press in the journal Social Networks.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 25.10.2011
Preschoolers understand threats in households with violence
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Preschoolersers are aware and understand threats when they see their mother harmed by violent conflicts at home, a new University of Michigan study finds. The study explored what factors influence children's comprehension and response when violence occurs. Researchers evaluated intimate partner violence?conflicts that can be physical or sexual'in the past year for 116 mother-child groups with known violence in the homes.

Social Sciences - 29.09.2011
Tweets study: People across the globe report similar, ever-changing moods
Tweets study: People across the globe report similar, ever-changing moods
Around the world, the day dawns full of promise. But moods go downhill over the course of the day, rebounding again in the evening, according to a Cornell analysis of the public Twitter messages of 2.4 million people in 84 countries. Equanimity perks up again on weekends - but later in the morning, suggesting mass sleeping-in.

Social Sciences - 29.09.2011
Tweets: People across the globe report similar, ever-changing moods
Tweets: People across the globe report similar, ever-changing moods
Around the world, the day dawns full of promise. But moods go downhill over the course of the day, rebounding again in the evening, according to a Cornell analysis of the public Twitter messages of 2.4 million people in 84 countries. Equanimity perks up again on weekends - but later in the morning, suggesting mass sleeping-in.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 27.09.2011
Researchers: Belief that others can change could help resolve Mideast conflict
Researchers: Belief that others can change could help resolve Mideast conflict
By presenting Israeli Jews and Israeli and West Bank Palestinians with evidence that groups of people are capable of change, Stanford researchers were able to increase the subjects' willingness to compromise on key political issues. Israelis and Palestinians have been locked in a bloody cycle of reciprocal retaliation for so long, it can be difficult to imagine the region without its tragic brand of perpetual motion.

Health - Social Sciences - 15.09.2011
Surprising find in anti-viral fight
Surprising find in anti-viral fight
A molecule which helps restrain the body's immune response is also capable of stimulating defences against virus infection by promoting the survival of immune cells known as Natural Killer (NK) cells, new University research has uncovered. Ian Humphreys, School of Medicine, and a Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow believes that the findings will have important implications for the design of vaccines to combat viral pathogens.