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Social Sciences - Health - 12.11.2010
Severe acne increase the risk of suicide attempt
Individuals who suffer from severe acne are at an increased risk of attempting suicide, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet. The study also finds that an additional risk may be present during and up to one year after treatment with isotretinoin, a commonly prescribed drug for severe acne.

Social Sciences - 26.10.2010
Friends with cognitive benefits: Mental function improves after certain kinds of socializing
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Talking with other people in a friendly way can make it easier to solve common problems, a new University of Michigan study shows. But conversations that are competitive in tone, rather than cooperative, have no cognitive benefits. "This study shows that simply talking to other people, the way you do when you're making friends, can provide mental benefits," said psychologist Oscar Ybarra, a researcher at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR).

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 22.10.2010
Population Report: More Jews Live in the U.S. than in Israel
October 22, 2010 — Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) and the University of Connecticut (UConn) have published a 2010 report on the American Jewish population, as part of a new North American Jewish Data Bank Report series. The new report called Jewish Population in the United States-2010 shows a greater number of Jews in the U.S. than in Israel.

Social Sciences - 18.10.2010
SpamBot Wants to be Your Friend
Social network sites such as Facebook, mySpace or Twitter are gaining popularity. But the web 2.0 faces us with new dangers. At the Vienna University of Technology (VUT), security hazards of social network sites have been detected and studied. Researchers of the VUT now provide advice on how to increase your safety in the web.

Social Sciences - Health - 27.09.2010
Predicting divorce: U-M study shows how fight styles affect marriage
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—It's common knowledge that newlyweds who yell or call each other names have a higher chance of getting divorced. But a new University of Michigan study shows that other conflict patterns also predict divorce. A particularly toxic pattern is when one spouse deals with conflict constructively, by calmly discussing the situation, listening to their partner's point of view, or trying hard to find out what their partner is feeling, for example—and the other spouse withdraws.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.09.2010
Drugs and alcohol, not mental illness, explains violent crime risk
Drugs and alcohol, not mental illness, explains violent crime risk
Health | Society 07 Sep 10 Bipolar disorder by itself does not increase the risk of committing violent crime, suggests a new study by Oxford University and the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Instead, the over-representation of individuals with bipolar disorder in violent crime statistics is almost entirely attributable to concurrent drug or alcohol abuse.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 07.09.2010
Bipolar disorder does not increase risk of violent crime
Bipolar disorder does not increase risk of violent crime
A new study from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet suggests that bipolar disorder - or manic-depressive disorder - does not increase the risk of committing violent crime. Instead, the over-representation of individuals with bipolar disorder in violent crime statistics is almost entirely attributable to concurrent substance abuse.

Health - Social Sciences - 11.08.2010
Competing for a mate can shorten lifespan
Competing for a mate can shorten lifespan
Study finds that when men outnumber women, men looking for mates have shortened lifespan than when gender balance is more equal. ? Love stinks! - the J. Geils band told the world in 1980, and while you can certainly argue whether or not this tender and ineffable spirit of affection has a downside, working hard to find it does.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 29.07.2010
Inklings of Suicide
Inklings of Suicide
Two powerful new tests developed by psychologists at Harvard University show great promise in predicting patients? risk of attempting suicide, researchers say. These tests may help clinicians to overcome their reliance on self-reporting by at-risk individuals, information that often proves misleading when suicidal patients wish to hide their intentions.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 28.07.2010
Warnings of suicidal intent
Warnings of suicidal intent
Two powerful new tests developed by Harvard psychologists show great promise in predicting patients? risk of attempting suicide, researchers say. These tests may help clinicians to overcome their reliance on self-reporting by at-risk individuals, information that often proves misleading when suicidal patients wish to hide their intentions.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.07.2010
Probing Question: Do boys or girls suffer more from poor body image?
Probing Question: Do boys or girls suffer more from poor body image?
By Melissa Beattie-Moss and A'ndrea Elyse Messer Research/Penn State Picture a crowded beach at the height of summer. Boys and girls of all shapes and sizes cavort in the waves and lounge on beach towels. It's the skin-baring season - and that can exacerbate body image woes for many teens. Who do you think is most unhappy with their bodies? Underweight or overweight? Girls or boys? If you guessed overweight girls, think again.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 27.07.2010
Psychologists Develop Two Potent New Predictors of Suicide Risk
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Steve Bradt 617.496.8070 Psychologists Develop Two Potent New Predictors of Suicide Risk Tests promise to help clinicians move beyond reliance on self-reporting by suicidal individuals Cambridge, Mass. July 28, 2010 - Two powerful new tests developed by psychologists at Harvard University show great promise in predicting patients' risk of attempting suicide.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.07.2010
Suicide attempt method affects prognosis
The method used for a suicide attempt is highly significant for the risk of subsequent successful suicide, reveals a long-term study from Karolinska Institutet. The results may be of help in acute risk assessment following a suicide attempt. Suicide is one of the most common causes of death among those aged 15 to 44.

Social Sciences - 13.07.2010
UK in 2051 to be 'significantly more diverse'
UK in 2051 to be ’significantly more diverse’
In a report published this week, researchers from the University of Leeds predict that ethnic minorities will make up one-fifth of the population by 2051 (compared to 8% in 2001), with the mixed ethnic population expected to treble in size. Their projections also indicate that the UK will become far less segregated as ethnic groups disperse throughout the country.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.07.2010
Call for more help for silent victims
Call for more help for silent victims
PA 177/10 "I have had major bone problems and an operation on my spine, and I am now questioning whether that was to do with the beatings?"…the words of a 63 year old woman who took part in new research just published, into the effects of domestic violence on older women. The year-long study by researchers at The University of Nottingham's Division of Nursing has concluded that more needs to be done to identify, support and protect these victims.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.07.2010
Homicide and suicide rates among mentally ill on the decline
Homicide and suicide rates among mentally ill on the decline
People with mental health problems are committing fewer homicides while the number of suicides by mental health patients has also fallen, latest figures reveal; a previous rise in homicides by mentally ill people may have been the result of drug misuse, says the report. The study, by the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness at The University of Manchester, also found that in-patient suicides have fallen to their lowest recorded figure and that patient suicides have fallen most sharply in people in their early 20s.

Social Sciences - Law - 07.07.2010
Disclosure checks under scrutiny
Researchers at the University have found that enhanced disclosure checks, which contain details of both spent and unspent convictions, give a false sense of reassurance as the majority of persistent and serious offenders are unknown to either the children's hearing system or the adult criminal justice system.

Health - Social Sciences - 05.07.2010
Are social democracies better for health than right-wing dictatorships : U-M study
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—A University of Michigan study finds that longevity increased faster under right-wing governments in southern Europe than under social democracies in the Nordic countries. The study, published online in the peer-reviewed journal Social Science and Medicine, examines changes in longevity patterns in eight European countries from 1950 to 2000.

Health - Social Sciences - 06.05.2010
Violent teenage girls fail to spot anger or disgust in others' faces
Violent teenage girls fail to spot anger or disgust in others’ faces
Girls appear to be "protected" from showing antisocial behaviour until their teenage years, new research from the University of Cambridge has found. The study sheds new light on antisocial behaviour in girls compared with boys and suggests that rather than violence or antisocial behaviour simply reflecting bad choices, the brains of people with antisocial behaviour may work differently from those who behave normally.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.04.2010
Nearly 4 million Californians report sexual or physical violence from a spouse or companion
Nearly 4 million adults in California reported being a victim of physical or sexual violence at the hands of a spouse, companion or other intimate partner, according to a new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Although reported incidences of intimate partner violence, or IPV, are widespread, especially among women and certain ethnic groups, reported IPV was surprisingly high among lesbians, gays and bisexuals in California, who are almost twice as likely to experience violence as heterosexual adults, researchers said.
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