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Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 22.02.2024
'Every person can learn to be more or less empathetic'
’Every person can learn to be more or less empathetic’
Empathy can be transferred. This means that people can learn or unlearn empathy by observing their environment. This is shown by a new study by Würzburg neuroscientist Grit Hein . With her latest evaluations of empathy skills, Würzburg professor Grit Hein has once again disproved the old adage: "What goes around comes around".

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 22.02.2024
Living in a violent neighborhood affects children’s brain development
Study (PDF): Exposure to Community Violence as a Mechanism Linking Neighborhood Disadvantage to Amygdala Reactivity and the Protective Role of Parental Nurturance Living in neighborhoods with high levels of violence can affect children's development by changing the way that a part of the brain detects and responds to potential threats, which could lead to poorer mental health and other negative outcomes.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 20.02.2024
Ancient genomes reveal Down Syndrome in past societies
Ancient genomes reveal Down Syndrome in past societies
Burials show that children with Down Syndrome and Edwards Syndrome were recognized as members of their communities An international team of researchers has analysed the DNA from a world-wide sample of nearly 10,000 ancient individuals to search for cases of Down Syndrome, an uncommon genetic condition caused by the presence of an additional copy of Chromosome 21.

Social Sciences - 16.02.2024
Only one in six rural councils made use of affordable housing option
Only 17% of rural local planning authorities have made use of Rural Exception Sites, a planning policy mechanism designed to boost the supply of affordable housing in rural areas, finds a new study by UCL researchers in association with the Rural Housing Network. Rural Exception Sites were introduced in England in 1991 to enable the development of affordable homes on underdeveloped land that would otherwise be restricted for residential development.

Social Sciences - 14.02.2024
Swipe, match, happy? Dating app users less satisfied with relationship status than non-users
Swipe, match, happy? Dating app users less satisfied with relationship status than non-users
Mobile dating apps are a popular way to meet people. They promise a fun partner and a happy love life. However, a new study by Radboud researchers shows that people who use dating apps actually tend to be overall less satisfied with their relationship status than those who don't. Connecting with others through mobile dating apps has become one of the most popular ways of meeting someone.

Social Sciences - Politics - 12.02.2024
’The role of social benefits for migration is overestimated’
What factors determine which countries people migrate to? Tim Müller from the Berlin Institute for Empirical Integration and Migration Research (BIM) has analysed this in a study of 160 countries. According to the study, important pull factors for migration are not so much social benefits, but rather good job opportunities, democratic conditions and the national language.

Social Sciences - 12.02.2024
Energy poverty in Cañada Real
Energy poverty in Cañada Real
Some 4,000 people in Madrid, almost half of the inhabitants of La Cañada Real, have experienced a situation of extreme energy poverty.

Media - Social Sciences - 08.02.2024
Private television channels use the concept of MENA for unaccompanied minors more than public ones
Private television channels use the concept of MENA for unaccompanied minors more than public ones
A study by María Dolores Bañón, professor at the University of Valencia (UV), concludes that, in the television treatment of information, private channels use the treatment of MENA more than public ones to refer to unaccompanied foreign minors.

Social Sciences - Environment - 08.02.2024
Surprising new evidence on happiness and wealth
Survey of people living in small, rural communities around the world suggests income not key to happiness Global polls typically show that people in industrialized countries where incomes are relatively high report greater levels of satisfaction with life than those in low-income countries. But now the first large-scale survey to look at happiness in small, non-industrialized communities living close to nature paints quite a different picture.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 06.02.2024
More food helps orangutans learn better
More food helps orangutans learn better
The adage "necessity is the mother of invention" is often used to describe the origin from which our cultural development springs. After all, necessity in times of scarcity has forced humans to constantly invent new technologies that have driven the remarkable cumulative culture of our species. But an invention only becomes cultural when it is learned and spread by many people.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.02.2024
How stigma hurts trans health
Researchers demonstrate a link between transgender people's exposure to gender-related stigma and cortisol, a key hormone in the stress response. For transgender and nonbinary people, feeling connected to one's community may alleviate the adverse health effects of chronic exposure to stigma, the latest findings of a U.S.-Canada study suggests.

Social Sciences - 01.02.2024
Who lives in rural Canada and who's most likely to move there?
Who lives in rural Canada and who’s most likely to move there?
A study by West ern researchers shows most newcomers - and the majority of Canadians - choose to live cities. It's a historical trend negatively impact smaller communities looking to counteract the effects of an aging population , declining birth rates and economic disparities the urban-rural divide.

Health - Social Sciences - 31.01.2024
Compounded effects of racism on mental distress, alcohol use, firearm purchases among Asian Americans during pandemic
Study: Understanding the Intersectionality of COVID-19 Racism, Mental Distress, Alcohol Use, and Firearm Purchase Behavior Among Asian Americans Racism provoked during the COVID-19 pandemic is directly tied to increased firearm purchases among Asian Americans, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Michigan and Eastern Michigan University.

Politics - Social Sciences - 29.01.2024
Differences between east and west are narrowing
Differences between east and west are narrowing
There is very little difference between people living in eastern and western Germany or those in rural and urban areas when they assess their quality of life. This surprising result is one of the key findings of the Germany Monitor 2023 , a newly developed annual scientific study that provides a new perspective on the social and political attitudes and assessments of the German population.

Social Sciences - 25.01.2024
Facial features linked to stereotypes and social class perception
Social class is a powerful hierarchy that determines many privileges and disadvantages in society. Research shows that people are quick to form impressions of other people's social class standing, which can have important consequences - but what specifically drives these impressions, and their relationship to judgements of harmful or advantageous stereotypes, has remained unknown.

Social Sciences - Environment - 24.01.2024
Women have higher levels of performance and green behaviours in social economy organisations
Women have higher levels of performance and green behaviours in social economy organisations
A study by IDOCAL (Research Institute in Psychology of Human Resources, Organisational Development and Quality of Work Life) of the University of Valencia concludes that women have higher levels of performance and green behaviours in social economy organisations, especially in cooperatives.

Social Sciences - 24.01.2024
Young People from Poorer Families Make Fewer Friends
A new study has found that children growing up in low-income families have fewer opportunities to make friends and to socially integrate at school. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University of Stockholm examined data from over 200 school classes in Sweden and reached this conclusion.

Social Sciences - 24.01.2024
What drives us to be anonymous online
University of Queensland researchers have found there are two key reasons people choose to be anonymous online - self-expression or toxic behaviour. A team led by PhD candidate Lewis Nitschinsk from UQ's School of Psychology collected data from more than 1,300 participants across the globe via an online survey and daily diary, where they tracked their online behaviour over a week.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.01.2024
Widening inequalities are fuelling childhood obesity
New research shows how widening inequalities are fuelling childhood obesity Childhood obesity has increased the most in less advantaged groups, according to a new study Childhood obesity has increased the most in less advantaged groups, according to a new study. The research - led by the University of Glasgow and published in Archives of Disease in Childhood - found that despite a plateau in overall childhood obesity since 2004, widening societal inequalities meant the increased prevalence of overweight and obesity was seen primarily in socioeconomically disadvantaged children.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 22.01.2024
How the brain responds to reward is linked to socioeconomic background
How the brain responds to reward is linked to socioeconomic background
An MIT study finds the brains of children who grow up in less affluent households are less responsive to rewarding experiences. MIT neuroscientists have found that the brain's sensitivity to rewarding experiences - a critical factor in motivation and attention - can be shaped by socioeconomic conditions.