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Agronomy / Food Science - Social Sciences - 14.05.2021
New Study Indicates Significant Increase in Food and Nutrition Insecurity in Brazil
Researchers from Freie Universitšt Berlin are investigating the pressing issue of food inequalities No 089/2021 from May 14, 2021 According to a study conducted by researchers at Freie Universitšt Berlin in cooperation with Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais and Universidade de BrasŪlia, as many as six out of ten households in Brazil are currently at risk of food and nutrition insecurity.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 13.05.2021
History of significant head injury in women prisoners linked with disability and past abuse
New research has found that 78% of women prisoners in Scotland have a history of significant head injury - most of which occurred in the context of domestic abuse that often lasted over periods of several years. The University of Glasgow-led study - funded by the Scottish Government and published today in the Lancet Psychiatry - also found 66% of women prisoners had suffered repeat head injuries for many years.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 10.05.2021
New birth cohort study will study children of the 2020s
A new nationally representative birth cohort study launching in England in the coming year will deliver valuable insights into child development, led by UCL researchers and commissioned and funded by the Department for Education. The Children of the 2020s Study will include babies born in April, May, and June 2021.

Social Sciences - 10.05.2021
Neighbors looking out for one another can lessen child abuse and neglect
Parents are less likely to neglect or abuse their children when they have supportive networks within their neighborhood and others on whom they can rely, a new University of Michigan study found. Neighborhood poverty is associated with increased risk for child abuse and neglect, but these relationships are driven, in part, by the impact neighborhood poverty has on the interactions between residents.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 06.05.2021
Animals laugh too, UCLA analysis suggests
Sifting through studies on various species' play behavior, researchers tracked vocalization patterns that show a strong similarity to human laughter Sifting through studies on various species' play behavior, researchers tracked vocalization patterns that show a strong similarity to human laughter Human laughter is common, but it's a somewhat mysterious part of our evolution.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 06.05.2021
Human burial from 78,000 years ago in Africa
Human burial from 78,000 years ago in Africa
ņfrica Pitarch, Beatriu de Pinůs researcher in the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar of the UB (SERP-UB) 000 years ago. Researchers found remains of a child aged between 2.5 and 3, in a shallow grave in the site of Panga ya Saidi (Kenya). This burial joins other evidence of the first social complex behaviour seen in Homo Sapiens.

Social Sciences - 05.05.2021
Being around children makes adults more generous, say researchers
New psychology research suggests adults are more compassionate and donate more to charity when they are in the presence of children. Last updated on Wednesday 5 May 2021 Adults are more compassionate and are up to twice as likely to donate to charity when children are present, according to a new study from psychologists.

Social Sciences - Pharmacology - 05.05.2021
The first step to curbing COVID vaccine misinformation is finding out who is most vulnerable
The success of Australia's COVID-19 vaccine rollout will depend on everyone's willingness to receive it. But experts have warned vaccine misinformation online puts Australia's communities at risk, and some more than others. Often, misinformation and undue scepticism are spread on social media. In March, the ABC reported on WeChat posts spreading the false claim the Pfizer vaccine can integrate with people's DNA to transform them into "genetically modified humans'.

Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 05.05.2021
Vaccine rollout not going well, say most Australians
Almost two-thirds of adult Australians, 64 per cent, think the Government's COVID-19 vaccine rollout is not being handled well, a study from The Australian National University (ANU) shows. The study also found there's been a small decline in the proportion of people who would not take a safe and effective vaccine, though many Australians remain highly concerned about potential side effects.

Social Sciences - Pharmacology - 05.05.2021
First step to curb COVID vaccine misinformation is finding out who is most vulnerable
The success of Australia's COVID-19 vaccine rollout will depend on everyone's willingness to receive it. But experts have warned vaccine misinformation online puts Australia's communities at risk, and some more than others. Often, misinformation and undue scepticism are spread on social media. In March, the ABC reported on WeChat posts spreading the false claim the Pfizer vaccine can integrate with people's DNA to transform them into "genetically modified humans'.

Social Sciences - 05.05.2021
Remains from oldest known human burial in Africa discovered
The remains of a partial skeleton dating back 78,000 years have been recovered from a pit in Kenya and are believed to be the earliest evidence of human burial in Africa, according to an international team including academics from UCL. Named 'Mtoto' - meaning child in Swahili - the remains were found to be of a 2.5 to 3-year-old infant, and were discovered by a team of scientists in a shallow grave at Panga ya Saldi, a cave site in the tropical upland coast of Kenya.

Social Sciences - Health - 04.05.2021
More youth report concussions since 2016, U-M study shows
Educating athletes, parents and coaches about concussion treatment and prevention has been a priority during the last decade, but are the intended audiences hearing the message? New research from the University of Michigan found that 1 in 4 adolescents self-reported at least one concussion in 2020, up from about 20% in 2016.

Social Sciences - 03.05.2021
Most Aussies say things look dire for when they retire
A majority of Australians think the age pension should be increased, while most Australians who aren't retired think they won't have enough money when they do. † The Australian National University (ANU) survey of almost 3,500 adults in early 2021 found more than seven-in-10 adults (70.5 per cent) think the current age pension of $944.30 per fortnight for a single person with no children isn't enough.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 03.05.2021
Stress and Mental Health Problems During First COVID-19-Lockdown
One-third of children and adolescents experienced mental health problems during the first COVID-19 lockdown in Switzerland. Parents and young adults also perceived considerable stress, yet the perceived stresses differed from those of children and adolescents, the first Switzerland-wide representative study by the University of Zurich and La Source School of Nursing Lausanne has shown.

Social Sciences - Health - 03.05.2021
Pandemic hits people with migration background harder
Pandemic hits people with migration background harder
Monday, May 3, 2021 — During the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, Belgium experienced significant excess mortality. The federal statistics office Statbel recorded 30,014 deaths between 9 March and 17 May 2020. That was 8,808 more than the average for the three previous years in the same weeks.

Health - Social Sciences - 29.04.2021
Wearable glucose monitors shed light on progression of Type 2 diabetes in Hispanic/Latino adults
Wearable glucose monitors shed light on progression of Type 2 diabetes in Hispanic/Latino adults
Study points to new directions for improved diabetes care In one of the first studies of its kind, medical and engineering researchers have shown wearable devices that continuously monitor blood sugar provide new insights into the progression of Type 2 diabetes among at-risk Hispanic/Latino adults. The findings by researchers from Sansum Diabetes Research Institute ( SDRI ) and Rice University are available online this week in EClinicalMedicine , an open-access clinical journal published by The Lancet .

Health - Social Sciences - 28.04.2021
Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
New UC San Diego study shows willingness to get a vaccine became increasingly politicized during the public health crisis Individuals who self-identify as Republicans became more skeptical of a potential COVID-19 vaccine and other inoculations, such as the flu shot, over the course of the pandemic, reveals a new study by the University of California San Diego's Rady School of Management.

Social Sciences - Health - 28.04.2021
Nearly one in four children in psychiatric hospitals admitted involuntarily
Nearly one-quarter (23.6%) of children and adolescents admitted to psychiatric hospital were admitted involuntarily, finds a new review of evidence from 11 countries, led by UCL researchers, which also uncovered substantial racial disparities. The study, the first systematic analysis social and clinical factors associated with admission, was published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

Social Sciences - 28.04.2021
Young people who experience bullying are more likely to fantasise about committing acts of violence - study
Young people who experience bullying are more likely to fantasise about committing acts of violence - study
Experiencing bullying and forms of aggression in late adolescence and early adulthood is linked to a marked increase in the likelihood of having daydreams or fantasies about hurting or killing people, according to a new study. It's the difference between conditions that make people angry and upset, and those that make people vengeful Manuel Eisner While research has shown that significant numbers of people fantasise about inflicting harm, little is known about the processes behind such "violent ideations".

Social Sciences - 28.04.2021
Sons favoured despite female shortage in endangered parrot
Sons favoured despite female shortage in endangered parrot
New research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows female swift parrots can determine the sex of their offspring, and they are favouring boys over girls as they face diminished survival prospects in the wild. Instead of producing extra daughters to make up for a shortage of adult females they make sure their sons hatch first so they get more food and become more competitive in a tight mating market.