news

« BACK

University of Toronto


Results 1 - 20 of 218.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 Next »


Physics - 04.08.2022
Up a creek without a paddle? Researchers suggest 'gunwale bobbing'
Up a creek without a paddle? Researchers suggest ’gunwale bobbing’
Stand up in a canoe and you'll probably find yourself in the water before too long. Jump up and down on the upper edges of the sides of the canoe, and you'll likely end up in the drink as well. But get the balance right and you'll be able to move yourself along by as much as one metre per second, according to  a study published in  Physical Review Fluids  examining gunwale bobbing.

Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Researchers crack 30-year-old mystery of odour switching in worms
Researchers crack 30-year-old mystery of odour switching in worms
Soil-dwelling nematodes depend on their sophisticated sense of smell for survival, able to distinguish between more than a thousand different scents - but the molecular mechanism behind their olfaction has baffled scientists for decades. Now, researchers at the University of Toronto's Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular & Biomolecular Research appear to have solved the long-standing mystery - and the implications of their findings stretch beyond nematode olfaction, perhaps offering insights into how the human brain functions.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.07.2022
New hydrogel for more targeted cancer treatments
New hydrogel for more targeted cancer treatments
University of Toronto researchers have designed a new way to grow cells in a lab that enables them to better emulate cancerous tumours. The platform - based on a type of material known as a hydrogel, a soft jelly-like substance - opens new ways to advance treatment options for cancer.

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.07.2022
Whales' eyes offer glimpse into their evolution from land to sea
Whales’ eyes offer glimpse into their evolution from land to sea
University of Toronto researchers have shed light on the evolutionary transition of whales' early ancestors from on-shore living to deep-sea foraging, suggesting that these ancestors had visual systems that could quickly adapt to the dark. Their findings show that the common ancestor of living whales was already a deep diver, able to see in the blue twilight zone of the ocean, with eyes that swiftly adjusted to dim conditions as the whale rushed down on a deep breath of surface air.

Campus - 26.07.2022
Researchers suggest ’home remedies’ to increase vaccine supply in Canada before next pandemic
COVID-19 has put a spotlight on Canada's pandemic preparedness, and led some experts and leaders to call for a new public agency that would be in charge of domestic vaccine production to increase self-sufficiency. But Paul Grootendorst , an associate professor at the University of Toronto's Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, says creating such an agency would be more trouble than it's worth.

Earth Sciences - Health - 25.07.2022
Researchers aim to predict cardiac events with AI technique used to analyze earthquakes
Researchers aim to predict cardiac events with AI technique used to analyze earthquakes
Sebastian Goodfellow , an assistant professor in the University of Toronto's department of civil and mineral engineering, and his team have partnered with researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) to help detect and diagnose heart arrhythmias. The project, supported by grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, aims to leverage techniques developed by Goodfellow and his colleague in their previous work, which involves using artificial intelligence (AI) to analyze seismic data.

Health - 25.07.2022
Researchers identify how cells move faster through mucus than blood
Some cells move faster in thicker fluid - think honey versus water, or mucus as opposed to blood - because their ruffled edges sense the viscosity of their environment and adapt to increase their speed. That was one of the surprising findings in a new study published in Nature Physics by researchers from the University of Toronto, Johns Hopkins University and Vanderbilt University.

Earth Sciences - 19.07.2022
The Earth's crust has been 'dripping' beneath the Andes Mountains for millions of years: Researchers
The Earth’s crust has been ’dripping’ beneath the Andes Mountains for millions of years: Researchers
Just like honey slowly dripping from a spoon, parts of the rocky outermost layer of Earth's shell are continuously sinking into the more fluid layer of the planet's mantle over the course of millions of years. Known as lithospheric dripping - named for the fragmenting of rocky material that makes up Earth's crust and upper mantle - the process results in significant deformations at the surface such as basins, folding of the crust and irregular elevations.

Health - Chemistry - 15.07.2022
Reverse engineering the heart: University of Toronto researchers create bioartificial left ventricle
Reverse engineering the heart: University of Toronto researchers create bioartificial left ventricle
University of Toronto researchers in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering have grown a small-scale model of a human left heart ventricle in the lab. The bioartificial tissue construct is made with living heart cells and beats strongly enough to pump fluid inside a bioreactor. In the human heart, the left ventricle is the one that pumps freshly oxygenated blood into the aorta, and from there into the rest of the body.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 13.07.2022
Two volcanic eruptions forever changed the brown kiwi
Two volcanic eruptions forever changed the brown kiwi
When two massive volcanic eruptions blanketed New Zealand in ash, they forever changed the genetics of the brown kiwi bird, a new study from the University of Toronto Scarborough has found. The brown kiwi are split into four distinct lineages that inhabit different parts of New Zealand's North Island.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.07.2022
University of Toronto astronomers are helping find the missing universe
University of Toronto astronomers are helping find the missing universe
Astronomers at the University of Toronto have spotted some of the most elusive stuff in our universe by taking a deep look at the cosmic web, the network of filaments and knots that trace the large-scale distribution of galaxies. Even though galaxies produce most of the visible light in the universe, they contain fewer than 10 per cent of all the atoms in the cosmos.

Environment - 12.07.2022
Canadians are not nearly as divided about environmental issues as we may think: Study
Canadians are not nearly as divided about environmental issues as we may think: Study
Canadians are not nearly as divided about many important environmental issues as we may think - and that lack of division could offer common ground in drafting national environmental policies, according to a new study. Researchers in the department of physical and environmental sciences at the University of Toronto Scarborough used Statistics Canada data to explore Canadians' behaviours and attitudes towards the environment.

Health - 08.07.2022
Family caregivers traumatized by COVID-19 lockdowns that limited access to those in long-term care: study
Essential family caregivers suffered "collective trauma" due to COVID-19 lockdowns that hampered their ability to see and care for loved ones in long-term care settings, new research co-authored by the University of Toronto's Charlene Chu suggests.

Astronomy / Space Science - 08.07.2022
International team of astronomers discovers two rare binary star systems
International team of astronomers discovers two rare binary star systems
An international team of astronomers has identified only the second and third examples of a rare type of star system comprising two central stars orbiting each other, encompassed by a remarkable disk of gas and dust. "If there were a planet in one of these systems, it would be like the planet Tatooine from  Star Wars ," says  Michael Poon , a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Arts & Science's  David A. Dunlap Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics  and one of two University of Toronto researchers involved in the discovery.

Pharmacology - Health - 06.07.2022
Rapid antibody test to gauge immune response to SARS-CoV-2 variants
COVID-19 infections are once again on the rise as our immune systems struggle to combat new variants. That's according to a University of Toronto study that found the antibodies generated by people who were vaccinated and/or recovered from COVID-19 prior to 2022 failed to neutralize the variants circulating today.

Environment - Campus - 27.06.2022
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
At a Toronto Port Lands construction site on the city's waterfront, keen-eyed workers recently spotted plants that had sprouted from soil recently exposed by the removal of tonnes of earth. The plants were hard stem bulrush and cattails, which are commonly found in freshwater marshes. Because the plants grew from a patch of ground that had been seven metres below the surface for a century, conservationists concluded that they had grown from seeds buried when Ashbridges Bay Marsh at the mouth of the Don River was covered with landfill in the early 1900s.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.06.2022
Mosquito-repellent paint? Researchers say slippery walls make it difficult for the biting insects to rest
Mosquito-repellent paint? Researchers say slippery walls make it difficult for the biting insects to rest
As the planet warms, outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases are becoming more common around the world. Traditional solutions include bed nets or chemical treatment - but researchers at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering are trying a new angle: mosquito-repellent paint.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 14.06.2022
AI-powered archaeology draws out hidden evidence of fire use by early humans
AI-powered archaeology draws out hidden evidence of fire use by early humans
Researchers from the University of Toronto, the Weizmann Institute of Science and Hebrew University have identified new evidence of the use of fire by ancient humans at least 800,000 years ago at a site in western Israel. The discovery, described in a study published this week in  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , suggests only the sixth location worldwide of evidence of fire more than half a million years old.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.06.2022
Researchers envision wood-derived, self-powered biosensors for wireless devices
Researchers envision wood-derived, self-powered biosensors for wireless devices
Wood-derived materials can be used to harvest electrical energy from everyday movements such as walking, according to University of Toronto and University of Waterloo researchers. In a new study recently published in Nano Energy , the team demonstrated the use of lignocellulosic nanofibrils - derived from tree bark - in a prototype self-powered device capable of sending a wireless signal to a smartphone via bluetooth.

Astronomy / Space Science - 06.06.2022
Hubble Space Telescope captures largest near-infrared image to find universe's rarest galaxies
Hubble Space Telescope captures largest near-infrared image to find universe’s rarest galaxies
An international team of scientists recently released the largest near-infrared image ever taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, enabling astronomers to map the star-forming regions of the universe and learn how the earliest, most distant galaxies originated. Named 3D-DASH, this high-resolution survey will allow researchers to find rare objects and targets for follow-up observations with the recently launched James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) during its decades-long mission.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 Next »