science wire

« BACK

Environment



Results 10001 - 10017 of 10017.
« Previous 1 ... 197 198 199 200 ... 201


Environment - Social Sciences - 09.02.2009
Scientists document salamander decline in Central America
Scientists document salamander decline in Central America
BERKELEY — The decline of amphibian populations worldwide has been documented primarily in frogs, but salamander populations also appear to have plummeted, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, biologists. The terrestrial salamander Pseudoeurycea goebeli , one of the commonest 40 years ago on the cloud forest slopes of the Tajumulco volcano, has now disappeared.

Environment - 08.02.2009
Fuelling up on waste coffee
09 February 2009 Fuelling up on waste coffee New research at the University of Sheffield has shown that oil can be extracted from waste coffee beans and used to produce biofuel for cars.

Economics / Business - Environment - 06.02.2009

Chemistry - Environment - 04.02.2009
Engineering technology pinpoints earliest signs of animal life
Engineering technology pinpoints earliest signs of animal life
PA 29/09 Scientists using revolutionary new technology developed at The University of Nottingham have recorded the earliest evidence of animal life so far. Using a scientific technique known as Hydropyrolysis (using hydrogen gas at high pressure) they have been able to date chemical fossils discovered in sedimentary rocks in Oman.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2009
Global Warming May Delay Recovery of Stratospheric Ozone
Office of News and Information Johns Hopkins University 901 South Bond Street, Suite 540 Baltimore, Maryland 21231 Phone: 443-287-9960 Fax: 443-287-9920 February 4, 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE JOHNS HOPKINS: Lisa De Nike Lde [a] jhu (p) edu , 443-287-9960 AMER. GEOPHYSICAL UNION: Maria-José Viñas mjvinas [a] agu (p) org , 202-777-7530 Increasing greenhouse gases could delay, or even postpone indefinitely the recovery of stratospheric ozone in some regions of the Earth, a Johns Hopkins earth scientist suggests.

Economics / Business - Environment - 29.01.2009

Environment - 28.01.2009
EPA presents clean construction workshop at Princeton, Feb. 2
Princeton's Department of Facilities will host an Environmental Protection Agency workshop on Monday, Feb.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.01.2009
Transportation fuels of the future - Nottingham leads the way
Transportation fuels of the future - Nottingham leads the way
PA 16/09 Fruit and veg may be good for you but in 10 years time we could be replacing fossil fuels and helping to save our planet by using the inedible bits that we throw away to run our cars, boats and planes.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.01.2009
Imperial researchers to help develop new ’green’ fuel sources
Imperial researchers to help develop new 'green' fuel sources Life scientists receive part of UK's largest ever public investment in bioenergy %0A " By Danielle Reeves Tuesday 27 January 2009 Imperia

Environment - History / Archeology - 22.01.2009
New Imperial studentships established to help scientists train for a career in the media
New Imperial studentships established to help scientists train for a career in the media Young scientists encouraged to enter the broadcast industry to improve science communication - %0A " Friday 23

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.01.2009

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.01.2009
Language is driven by culture, not biology
Language in humans has evolved culturally rather than genetically, according to a study by Professor Nick Chater (UCL Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences) and US colleagues published today in the 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' (PNAS). By modelling the ways in which genes for language might have evolved alongside language itself, the study showed that genetic adaptation to language would be highly unlikely, as cultural conventions change much more rapidly than genes.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.01.2009
Language is driven by culture, not biology
Language in humans has evolved culturally rather than genetically, according to a study by Professor Nick Chater (UCL Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences) and US colleagues published today in the 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' (PNAS). By modelling the ways in which genes for language might have evolved alongside language itself, the study showed that genetic adaptation to language would be highly unlikely, as cultural conventions change much more rapidly than genes.

Health - Environment - 18.01.2009
Bleeding hearts revealed with new scan
Bleeding hearts revealed with new scan Images that show bleeding inside the heart after a heart attack captured in new study %0A " Imperial College London News Release Under STRICT EMBARGO for 00&per

Health - Environment - 11.01.2009
New genetic study sheds light on serious childhood disease
New genetic study sheds light on serious childhood disease Genetic variations that predispose children to Kawasaki Disease discovered %0A " Imperial College London News Release Under strict embargo f

Environment - 08.01.2009

Environment - Physics - 02.01.2009
Carbon Dioxide Rich Atmosphere Present in Ancient Ice Age
Research by the University of Birmingham has provided evidence that a warm atmosphere rich in carbon dioxide was present in an ancient ice age. This could only have happened if the planet was nearly all covered in ice and snow. Scientists from the University's School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, say that, whereas today, we associate more greenhouse gases with a warm world, in a very severe ice age, even plenty of greenhouse gas cannot stop the world being covered in reflective ice and snow.
« Previous 1 ... 197 198 199 200 ... 201