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Environment - Physics - 24.11.2011
Mast from classic racing yacht holds one of the keys to sustainable biofuels
The mast from a classic racing yacht and samples from a Forestry Commission breeding trial have played a key role in the search for sustainable biofuels. Cellulose is the most abundant organic polymer on earth — and therefore a potentially major source of glucose for the production of biofuels.

History / Archeology - Environment - 23.11.2011
Film weaves scientific and religious views of ’The Journey of the Universe’
"Journey of the Universe," a documentary exploring the human connection to Earth and the cosmos, which was produced by Yale historian of religions Mary Evelyn Tucker , will premiere on PBS stations nationwide beginning Dec.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.11.2011
They call it 'guppy love': UCLA biologists solve an evolution mystery
They call it ’guppy love’: UCLA biologists solve an evolution mystery
Guppies in the wild have evolved over at least half-a-million years — long enough for the males' coloration to have changed dramatically.

Environment - 23.11.2011

History / Archeology - Environment - 23.11.2011
'Journey of the Universe' premieres on PBS in December
"Journey of the Universe," a documentary exploring the human connection to Earth and the cosmos, which was produced by Yale historian of religions Mary Evelyn Tucker , will premiere on PBS stations nationwide beginning Dec.

Chemistry - Environment - 22.11.2011
Professor Imagines the Limitless Potential of Sewage
Most people would rather not think twice about their waste, but Kartik Chandran spends hours a day considering the limitless potential of sewage.

Environment - 22.11.2011
Enough water to double food production
There is enough water in the major basins of the world to double their food production in the next decades, scientists have found.

Environment - 22.11.2011
Is sustainability science really a science?
Is sustainability science really a science?
The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively since the late 1980s, only in the last decade has the field matured into a cohesive area of science. Los Alamos and Indiana University researchers say "yes" LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 22, 2011—The idea that one can create a field of science out of thin air, just because of societal and policy need, is a bold concept.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.11.2011
New projection shows global food demand doubling by 2050
Increasing yield in poor countries could lower environmental impact Media Note: Embargoed until 2 p.m. Nov. 21 MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (11/21/2011) —Global food demand could double by 2050, according to a new projection by David Tilman, Regents Professor of Ecology in the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences, and colleagues, including Jason Hill, assistant professor in the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences.

Health - Environment - 21.11.2011
Taking bushmeat off the menu could increase child anemia
Taking bushmeat off the menu could increase child anemia
A new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, finds that consuming bushmeat had a positive effect on children's nutrition, raising complex questions about the trade-offs between human health and environmental conservation.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 21.11.2011
Peruvian villagers how to protect adobe buildings from earthquake collapse
Peruvian villagers how to protect adobe buildings from earthquake collapse
Children playing with wooden blocks that were used to represent adobe blocks during the training on earthquake basics and earthquake preparedness for children.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.11.2011
Carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere was much smaller during last ice age than in today's climate
Carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere was much smaller during last ice age than in today’s climate
A reconstruction of plants' productivity and the amount of carbon stored in the ocean and terrestrial biosphere at the last ice age is published today. The research by an international team of scientists greatly increases our understanding of natural carbon cycle dynamics. A reconstruction of plants' productivity and the amount of carbon stored in the ocean and terrestrial biosphere at the last ice age is published today.  The research by an international team of scientists greatly increases our understanding of natural carbon cycle dynamics.

Environment - 18.11.2011
Rice workshop attracts international participants
Rice workshop attracts international participants
The First International Workshop on the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) in Latin America and the Caribbean was held at Earth University in Costa Rica Oct.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.11.2011
EPFL's long history of engineering geology
EPFL's long history of engineering geology
It was an era of massive construction projects - dams, roads, and bridges - and many felt there was a need to better understand and control the behavior of the soil and rock underpinnings of all these infrastructures.

Chemistry - Environment - 18.11.2011
A Corny Turn for Biofuels from Switchgrass:
A Corny Turn for Biofuels from Switchgrass:
Many experts believe that advanced biofuels made from cellulosic biomass are the most promising alternative to petroleum-based liquid fuels for a renewable, clean, green, domestic source of transportation energy. however, does not make it easy. Unlike the starch sugars in grains, the complex polysaccharides in the cellulose of plant cell walls are locked within a tough woody material called lignin.

Environment - Economics / Business - 18.11.2011
From empty words to green action
By international comparison, the Swedes are among those with best knowledge of environmental and climate problems.

Economics / Business - Environment - 18.11.2011
Two new engineering Master’s programmes
Two new engineering Master's programmes are being taught through the Faculty of Engineering. Food Innovation and Product Design (FIPDES) is a new Erasmus Mundus Master’s programme being offered in collaboration between France, Ireland and Sweden through the Division of Packaging Logistics at LTH.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.11.2011
EPFL's long history of Geotechnical Engineering
EPFL's long history of Geotechnical Engineering
It was an era of massive construction projects - dams, roads, and bridges - and many felt there was a need to better understand and control the behavior of the soil and rock underpinnings of all these infrastructures.

Environment - Health - 17.11.2011
Report Says New York State May Soon Suffer Outsize Effects From Climate Change
Street flooding that occurred during Hurricane Irene could become more common in the decades ahead.

Civil Engineering - Environment - 17.11.2011
Rivers may aid climate control in cities
Rivers may aid climate control in cities Planners could make greater use of urban waterways to regulate environmental temperature in our cities, according to research presented today (17 November 2011).

Environment - 17.11.2011
ARVE published in
ARVE published in "Global Change Biology"
ARVE researchers at EPFL/ENAC publish in "Global Change Biology" on the effects of land use and climate change on the carbon cycle of Europe over the past 500 years! Learn more on http://arve.

Environment - 16.11.2011
Publication in the "Revista de Edificación"
An article by Emmanuel Rey of the Laboratory of Architecture and Sustainable Technologies (LAST) is published in the last issue of the Spanish journal "Revista de Edificación" (RE). This contribution deals with the topic of sustainable urban housing with, as a basis, the experiences encountered notably during the development of the Ecoparc district in Neuchâtel (Switzerland).

Environment - Chemistry - 16.11.2011
Long-term study shows acid pollution in rain decreases with emissions
Long-term study shows acid pollution in rain decreases with emissions
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Emissions regulations do have an environmental impact, according to a long-term study of acidic rainfall by researchers at the University of Illinois. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program collects rainfall samples weekly from more than 250 stations across the United States and analyzes them for pollutants.

Environment - 16.11.2011
Poll: Pennsylvania citizens doubt media, environmentalists, scientists, governor in ’fracking’ debate
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-Pennsylvanians have significant doubts about the credibility of the media, environmental groups and scientists on the issue of natural gas drilling using "fracking" methods, a new poll says.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 15.11.2011
Erratic, extreme day-to-day weather puts climate change in new light
Erratic, extreme day-to-day weather puts climate change in new light
by Morgan Kelly The first climate study to focus on variations in daily weather conditions has found that day-to-day weather has grown increasingly erratic and extreme, with significant fluctuations in sunshine and rainfall affecting more than a third of the planet. Princeton University researchers recently reported in the Journal of Climate that extremely sunny or cloudy days are more common than in the early 1980s, and that swings from thunderstorms to dry days rose considerably since the late 1990s.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
Harm not those strangers that pollinate, study warns
Harm not those strangers that pollinate, study warns
by Morgan Kelly In an irony of nature, invasive species can become essential to the very ecosystems threatened by their presence, according to a recent discovery that could change how scientists and governments approach the restoration of natural spaces.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.11.2011
Insects offer clues to climate variability 10,000 years ago
Insects offer clues to climate variability 10,000 years ago
CHAMPAIGN, lll. An analysis of the remains of ancient midges - tiny non-biting insects closely related to mosquitoes - opens a new window on the past with a detailed view of the surprising regional variability that accompanied climate warming during the early Holocene epoch, 10,000 to 5,500 years ago.

Health - Environment - 14.11.2011
Study Quantifies Health Costs of Climate Change-Related Disasters
Groundbreaking Study Quantifies Health Costs of Climate Change-Related Disasters in the U.S. Health costs exceeding $14 billion dollars and involving 21,000 emergency room visits, nearl

Environment - 14.11.2011
Clothing, food and electricity impact most on water footprint
Australians have been working hard to cut down their household's daily water consumption, however a new study in the latest edition of Building Research & Information reveals that clothing, food and electricity are the three biggest culprits for a household's high water usage.

Environment - 11.11.2011
Trees on Tundra’s Border Are Growing Faster in a Hotter Climate
Trees in Alaska's far north are growing faster than they were a hundred years ago says a study led by Lamont-Doherty scientist Laia Andreu-Hayles. Credit: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Evergreen trees at the edge of Alaska's tundra are growing faster, suggesting that at least some forests may be adapting to a rapidly warming climate, says a new study.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 10.11.2011
Brazil joins the International Charter ’Space and Major Disasters’
Brazil joins the International Charter 'Space and Major Disasters' In the year that severe flooding and landslides claimed over 800 lives in Brazil's Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil has joined the inter

Environment - 10.11.2011
Aerosols make fixing climate change even costlier
Aerosols make fixing climate change even costlier
Remediating long-term effects of fossil fuel combustion and other human-driven processes filling the atmosphere with invisible particles will be even costlier than previously thought, a Cornell earth scientist is claiming in a new study. Natalie Mahowald, associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences, reports , Nov.

Environment - Health - 10.11.2011
New book shares life lessons from 'wisest Americans'
New book shares life lessons from ’wisest Americans’
For 25 years, Cornell gerontologist Karl Pillemer has researched answers to many facets of aging - coping with Alzheimer's disease, improving nursing home care and supporting family caregivers.

Environment - 09.11.2011
National differences in reporting of climate scepticism
National differences in reporting of climate scepticism
An Oxford University study of climate change coverage in six countries suggests that newspapers in the UK and the US have given far more column space to the voices of climate sceptics than the press in Brazil, France, India and China. More than 80 per cent of the times that sceptical voices were included, they were in pieces in the UK and US press, according to the research.

Economics / Business - Environment - 09.11.2011
Research into cities of the future to be boosted with new London centre
By Laura Gallagher Thursday 10 November 2011 London is becoming a global leader in future cities research, after Imperial College London, Cisco and UCL today entered into a three year initial agreement to create a Future Cities Centre in the capital.

Environment - Economics / Business - 09.11.2011
Bushland battle: biodiversity or bioenergy
Bushland battle: biodiversity or bioenergy
Opening our native forests to the bioenergy market will be 'all pain for no gain', according to a leading Australian economist and forestry expert.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.11.2011
Satellite technology enables rapid, accurate mapping of forest harvest in upper Midwest
Mutlu Ozdogan, assistant professor of forest and wildlife ecology at the UW-Madison, processes images from the Landsat satellite to reveal changes in forest composition over time.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.11.2011
Early Results from Hydraulic Fracturing Study Show No Direct Link to Groundwater Contamination
FORT WORTH, Texas — Preliminary findings from a study on the use of hydraulic fracturing in shale gas development suggest no direct link to reports of groundwater contamination, the project leader at The University of Texas at Austin's Energy Institute said Wednesday. "From what we've seen so far, many of the problems appear to be related to other aspects of drilling operations, such as poor casing or cement jobs, rather than to hydraulic fracturing, per se," said Charles 'Chip' Groat , a university geology professor and Energy Institute associate director who is leading the project.

Environment - Economics / Business - 09.11.2011
Carbon mitigation strategy uses wood for buildings first, bioenergy second
Carbon mitigation strategy uses wood for buildings first, bioenergy second
Proposals to remove the carbon dioxide caused by burning fossil fuel from the atmosphere include letting commercially managed forests grow longer between harvests or not cutting them at all.

Environment - Economics / Business - 08.11.2011
Lessons from a German bank could cut energy bills for UK homeowners
Lessons from a German bank could cut energy bills for UK homeowners
UK home owners could see reduced energy bills if the government's energy policy takes lessons from a publicly owned German bank that has pioneered energy-efficient construction over the past 30 years, a new report has found.

Health - Environment - 08.11.2011
Management support is crucial for success of worker wellness plans
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-Buy-in from the boss, along with signs posted to encourage stair use and walking paths, result in more exercise and fewer sick days for employees, a University of Michigan study shows.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 08.11.2011
Link Established Between Air Pollution and Cyclone Intensity in Arabian Sea
Pollution is making Arabian Sea cyclones more intense, according to a multi-institutional study that included scientists at UCSD's Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Traditionally, prevailing wind shear patterns prohibit cyclones in the Arabian Sea from becoming major storms. A paper appearing in the Nov.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.11.2011
To dredge or not to dredge: Class analyzes inlet options
To dredge or not to dredge: Class analyzes inlet options
Every fall, students in Restoration Ecology (HORT 4400) take on a real-world project in the local community, working together to gather data, analyze the issues and report their findings.

Economics / Business - Environment - 06.11.2011
Spin-out is energy-saver for business
Spin-out is energy-saver for business
The latest spin-out from Oxford University, Pilio Limited, provides a cost-effective online tool enabling small and medium businesses to monitor and manage their energy usage, potentially saving up to 40 per cent of their energy budget.

Environment - Economics / Business - 04.11.2011
New professors signal fresh ambitions for science policy research at Sussex
New professors signal fresh ambitions for science policy research at Sussex The University of Sussex continues to tackle the most challenging issues for governments and policy makers with the appointment of three big names in the field of science and technology policy.

Economics / Business - Environment - 04.11.2011
Green Homes in Texas Add $25,000 to Resale Value
AUSTIN, Texas - A new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) finds that new homes in Texas built to meet green building standards such as LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), the world's most widely used green building rating system, are worth an average of $25,000 more in resale value than conventional homes.

Environment - Economics / Business - 03.11.2011
Developing a sustainable laboratory
Developing a sustainable laboratory
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from across Wales is aiming to tackle waste and shape the laboratory of the future by redesigning the lifecycle of laboratory gloves.

Environment - Administration - 03.11.2011
How should society pay for services ecosystems provide?
Two U of M faculty join the world's leading ecologists in addressing this issue MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (11/03/2011) —Over the past 50 years, 60 percent of all ecosystem services have declined as a direct result of the conversion of land to the production of foods, fuels and fibers.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 03.11.2011
Scientists hone the power of grass fuel -- with help from New York school district
Scientists hone the power of grass fuel -- with help from New York school district
It takes 70 million years to grow a crop of fossil fuel but just 70 days to grow a crop of grass pellet fuel.

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