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Event - Health - 20.09.2019
Veterinary surgeons awarded ‘impact award' for changing antimicrobial use in veterinary practice
Veterinary surgeons awarded ‘impact award’ for changing antimicrobial use in veterinary practice
Veterinary researchers from the universities of Bristol and Surrey have been awarded a prestigious award by the Veterinary Record, the official journal of the British Veterinary Association (BVA), for their contribution to changing antimicrobial use in veterinary practice.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.09.2019

Life Sciences - Health - 20.09.2019
New world-leading facility for UCL Neuroscience gains planning approval
UCL is delighted to announce that conditional planning permission* has been granted for a new £281.6m state-of-the-art facility, which will be home to UCL Neuroscience.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.09.2019
FDA approves cobas Babesia, Roche’s first whole blood test for donor screening
Roche is dedicated to helping save patients' lives by delivering state-of-the-art solutions to aid in the protection of the global blood supply from infectious diseases If undetected, Babesia infecti

Life Sciences - Health - 19.09.2019
How to construct a protein factory
How to construct a protein factory
The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing. Having achieved great success in elucidating these structures in recent years, biologists are now taking on the next challenge: to find out more about how they are constructed. A joint research project between two groups from the University of Bern and ETH Zurich now provides insight into a very unusual construction process in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.09.2019
AveXis presents new data at EPNS continuing to show significant therapeutic benefit of Zolgensma in prolonging event-free survival now up to 5 years of age in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) Type 1
New interim data from SPR1NT study supports critical importance of early intervention in pre-symptomatic SMA patients, leading to age-appropriate major milestone gain Updated results from global STR1

Health - Philosophy - 18.09.2019
William Meadow, pioneer in neonatal intensive care and medical ethics, 1948-2019
Prof. William L. Meadow, a leading authority on the care of infants born prematurely or with significant health concerns, died Sept.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Brain implant restores visual perception to the blind
Seven years ago, Jason Esterhuizen was in a horrific car crash that destroyed his eyes, plunging him into total darkness.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.09.2019
FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Roche’s Gazyva (obinutuzumab) in Lupus Nephritis
There are currently no U.S. FDA-approved medicines for lupus nephritis The designation is based on the results of the phase II NOBILITY study that showed Gazyva, in combination with standard of care, helped more people achieve a complete renal response than standard of care alone Full results from the NOBILITY study will be presented at a medical meeting later this year Roche today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD) to Gazyva (obinutuzumab) for adults with lupus nephritis.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 17.09.2019
Prestigious grant to use Artificial Intelligence for improved glucose control
Prestigious grant to use Artificial Intelligence for improved glucose control
The ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research of the University of Bern is the recipient of a grant from JDRF, the leading global funder for type 1 diabetes research.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.09.2019
Novartis Cosentyx positive 16-week PREVENT results advance potential new indication for patients with axial spondyloarthritis
Phase III PREVENT study met 16-week primary endpoint of ASAS40 in patients with active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA).

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2019
In human cells and mice, a cure for the common cold, Stanford-UCSF study reports
Disabling a single, apparently noncritical protein in cells may foil replication of the viruses that cause half of all common colds, polio and other diseases, according to researchers at Stanford and UCSF. Temporarily disabling a single protein inside our cells might be able to protect us from the common cold and other viral diseases, according to a study led by researchers at Stanford University and University of California-San Francisco.

Computer Science / Telecom - Health - 16.09.2019
AI to enhance manufacturing, energy, and healthcare thanks to £6.5m EPSRC grant
The grant will help scientists, engineers, and clinicians train algorithms to solve energy, manufacturing, and healthcare problems.

Environment - Health - 16.09.2019
UCL launches new campaign to celebrate its disruptive discoveries
UCL is today launching the public phase of its major new campaign #MadeAtUCL to celebrate over 100 disruptive discoveries pioneered by some of the university's leading researchers.

Health - Veterinary Science - 16.09.2019

Pharmacology - Health - 13.09.2019
Novartis Phase III ASCLEPIOS trials demonstrate robust efficacy of ofatumumab in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis
Both ASCLEPIOS I and II studies met their primary endpoints in patients with relapsing forms of MS (RMS) ; overall ofatumumab (OMB157), a subcutaneous, potent, fully-human antibody targeting CD20 pos

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 13.09.2019
Experts warn UK food safety at risk with public softened up for lower standards
There are signs that the government is trying to soften up the public for lower food standards post-Brexit, including imported chlorinated chicken and hormone-treated beef, a new briefing from the Food Research Collaboration has highlighted.

Pharmacology - Health - 13.09.2019
Roche presents new 6-year OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) data which showed that earlier initiation and continuation of treatment reduced disability progression in multiple sclerosis
Post-hoc analysis from a Phase III open-label extension study showed a 42 percent reduction in the risk of PPMS patients needing a wheelchair after 6.5 years of OCREVUS treatment compared with patients who started OCREVUS after the double-blind period Interim analysis of Phase IIIb study shows 87 percent of patients with suboptimal response to previous treatment had no evidence of disease activity one year after switching to OCREVUS Separ

Pharmacology - Health - 13.09.2019
Roche’s fixed-dose subcutaneous combination of Perjeta and Herceptin showed non-inferiority when compared to intravenous formulations for people with HER2-positive breast cancer
New fixed-dose combination is administered under the skin in just minutes, significantly reducing the time spent receiving treatment Data will be submitted to health authorities around the world, inc

Psychology - Health - 12.09.2019
While modern life may exacerbate depression, it may also give us the tools to treat it
Worldwide, rates of depression increased by 15 percent between 2005 and 2015, according to the World Health Organization.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.09.2019
Pioneering data research centres to enable cutting-edge research and innovation to benefit UK patients
The University of Birmingham will play a key role in new data hubs that will enable cutting-edge research for health discoveries and aim to give patients across the UK faster access to pioneering new treatments. Led by Health Data Research UK , the hubs aim to improve the lives of people with debilitating conditions, and will link up different types of health data and make it more easily accessible and user-friendly for research, while maintaining strict controls around data privacy and consent.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.09.2019
Decoding Messages in the Body's Microscopic Metropolises
Decoding Messages in the Body’s Microscopic Metropolises
A study aimed at identifying and examining the small messenger proteins used by microbes living on and inside humans has revealed an astounding diversity of more than 4,000 families of molecules - many of which have never been described previously. The research, led by Stanford University and now published in Cell , lays the groundwork for future investigations into how the trillions of bacteria, archaea, and fungi that compose human microbiomes compete for resources, attack and co-exist with one another, and interact with our own cells.

Pharmacology - Health - 12.09.2019
Roche’s satralizumab significantly reduced relapse risk in second positive phase III study for neuromyelitis optica spectrum
Roche's satralizumab significantly reduced relapse risk in second positive phase III study for neuromyelitis optica spectrum Pivotal phase III SAkuraStar study shows 55% reduction in the risk of rela

Pharmacology - Health - 12.09.2019
Roche’s Tecentriq as a first-line monotherapy helped certain people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer live longer compared with chemotherapy
Data will be shared with health authorities globally, including the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA)Bullet Roche today announced positive data from the Phase

Health - Administration - 11.09.2019
Top doctors release new guidance on how to stay fit and healthy
The UK's top doctors are recommending over-65s take up dancing, bowls or even activities like tai chi to help stave off injury and illness in old age.

Health - 11.09.2019
Support for voice-hearers goes online
Support for voice-hearers goes online
People who hear voices, their families and mental health professionals will benefit from a new information and support website based on research by Durham University.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.09.2019
FDA Phase 1 Trial Shows Hydrogel to Repair Heart Is Safe to Inject in Humans-A First
Ventrix, a University of California San Diego spin-off company, has successfully conducted a first-in-human, FDA-approved Phase 1 clinical trial of an injectable hydrogel that aims to repair damage and restore cardiac function in heart failure patients who previously suffered a heart attack. The trial is the first to test a hydrogel designed to repair cardiac tissue.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.09.2019
Saving the Tasmanian devil: crowdfunded mission raises new hope
Saving the Tasmanian devil: crowdfunded mission raises new hope
Extinction once seemed inevitable for the Tasmanian devil, but on an expedition to the state's remote southwest, researchers made a discovery that could help protect the species.

Health - Event - 11.09.2019

Health - Life Sciences - 10.09.2019

Life Sciences - Health - 10.09.2019
Wyss Center and Osypka announce collaboration
Wyss Center and Osypka announce collaboration
Today the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering, Geneva, Switzerland and OSYPKA AG/OSYPKA Medtec, Rheinfelden, Germany and Longmont, Colorado, USA, announced a collaboration to develop and integrate innovative technologies into implantable neuro-devices.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.09.2019

Social Sciences - Health - 10.09.2019

Pharmacology - Health - 10.09.2019
Roche presents new OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) biomarker data that increase understanding of disease progression in multiple sclerosis at ECTRIMS
Blood neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels were significantly lowered following OCREVUS treatment in analyses of Phase III studies in RMS and PPMS New data show NfL may be a biomarker for predicting future disability outcomes Separate analyses presented from one of the first studies to demonstrate NfL levels are correlated with active MRI lesions in PPMS Roche today announced new data from OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) trials in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS).

Health - Life Sciences - 09.09.2019
Tiny capsules packed with gene-editing tools offer alternative to viral delivery of gene therapy
New tools for editing genetic code offer hope for new treatments for inherited diseases, some cancers, and even stubborn viral infections. But the typical method for delivering gene therapies to specific tissues in the body can be complicated and may cause troubling side effects. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have addressed many of those problems by packing a gene-editing payload into a tiny, customizable, synthetic nanocapsule.

Pharmacology - Health - 09.09.2019
Novartis data confirm long-term efficacy and safety of Aimovig for majority of patients with episodic migraine
The 5-year open-label treatment period (OLTP) examines sustained efficacy and long-term safety of Aimovig (erenumab) in patients with episodic migraine, starting on 70mg and switched after two years

Pharmacology - Health - 09.09.2019
Validates guidelines on treating patients with an underactive thyroid
A study led by the University of Birmingham provides strong support for current recommendations on treating patients with an underactive thyroid and validates latest UK and US guidelines, say researchers. The retrospective cohort study , published in The BMJ , analysed anonymous GP records of over 162,000 patients who have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism - a highly prevalent condition more commonly known as an underactive thyroid.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 09.09.2019

Health - 09.09.2019
Glass down, FASD awareness turned up
Most Australians know it is unsafe to drink during pregnancy, but researchers say the number of children with lifelong impacts from Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) remains far too high.

Health - 07.09.2019
Researchers lead new national guidance on how to stay fit and healthy
Researchers lead new national guidance on how to stay fit and healthy
Guidance on how the UK population can stay fit and healthy has been updated thanks to a major review led by the University of Bristol. The physical activity guidelines issued today by the four Chief Medical Officers (CMOs) of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, offer advice to all age groups and - for the first time - pregnant women, new mums and disabled adults.
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