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Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2012
Microfluidics Research Aims for New Cancer Diagnostics
Microfluidics Research Aims for New Cancer Diagnostics
At the KTH Symposium, the director of the U.S. National Science Foundation explains how scientific co-operation with Sweden benefits American research.

Health - Physics - 01.02.2012
Microfluidics and Nanotech Research Aims for New Cancer Diagnostics
Microfluidics and Nanotech Research Aims for New Cancer Diagnostics
Reception and service at central level for international students after arrival at KTH. For Master's students For Exchange students At the KTH Symposium, the director of the U.S. Nat

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.02.2012
Straight from the gut: Microbes can cause obesity
Obesity and chronic liver disease can be triggered by a family of proteins that alter populations of microbes in the stomach, a discovery that suggests the condition may be infectious, Yale scientists report. The study, in the advance online publication of Nature , expands on earlier Yale research that showed how similar microbial imbalances caused by the same family of proteins increases the risk of intestinal diseases such as colitis.

Health - Environment - 01.02.2012
Children test the air for pollutants in Brighton science project
by Simon Levey Wednesday 1 February 2012 Children from Brighton have been testing the air quality in their school playgrounds to monitor how pollution from neighbouring roads might affect them and their environment.

Health - 01.02.2012
Anton part of the key to diabetes mystery
When Anton was born, a test was done on the umbilical cord which showed that he had a raised genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Since then he has been one of several thousand children participating in Teddy, a study which is expected to lead to a better understanding of the disease and to a vaccine.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.02.2012
Obesity operations a mystery for diabetes researchers
Within just a few days of having obesity surgery, the majority of patients cease to suffer from type 2 diabetes. At the Lund University Diabetes Centre, a research group is trying to get to grips with the apparently inexplicable connection. It is hoped that in the long run a cure could be developed.

Health - 01.02.2012
Sunlight could reduce risk of diabetes
Many people spend most of their life indoors. We work indoors during the day, perhaps sit in front of the television or computer in the evenings and go to bed late.

Economics / Business - Health - 01.02.2012
Effective link between diabetes researches and business sector
The Lund University Diabetes centre has been conducting cutting-edge research on diabetes for a number of years.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.02.2012
Prostate cancer risk halved for subfertile men
Involuntary childlessness owing to reduced fertility is a concern for many men. However, these men do have one advantage – they run a significantly lower risk of suffering from prostate cancer. Researchers are interested in whether this phenomenon could be used in the fight against cancer. There is a clear link between male subfertility and a lower risk of prostate cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2012
Nano-Sized Protein Clusters Address Major Challenge of Drug Delivery
Nano-Sized Protein Clusters Address Major Challenge of Drug Delivery
AUSTIN, TX — A new form of proteins discovered by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin could drastically improve treatments for cancer and other diseases, as well as overcome some of the largest challenges in therapeutics: delivering drugs to patients safely, easily and more effectively.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2012
‘Picture This #14′ Polymelus, Museum of Zoology
‘Picture This #14′ Polymelus, Museum of Zoology
All British thoroughbred racehorses, including Polymelus, are descended from three stallions - the Darley Arabian, the Godolphin Arabian and the Byerley Turk.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.02.2012
FDA approves Novartis drug Glivec label recommending extending treatment to three years for certain GIST patients after surgery
Phase III results showed 54% reduction in risk of recurrence and 55% reduction in risk of death after three years' adjuvant Glivec in adults with KIT+ GIST Approval builds on vast experience with Glivec, first approved 10 years ago for treatment of adults with metastatic and/or unresectable KIT+ GIST Basel, February 1, 2012 - Novartis announced today that following a priority review, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an upda

Economics / Business - Health - 01.02.2012
A Study on the Impact of Good Teachers Sparks National Attention
Teachers who succeed in raising standardized test scores have a lasting influence on their students' lives, helping them avoid teenage pregnancy, go to college and earn more money as adults, accordin

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2012
Scientists decode brain waves to eavesdrop on what we hear
Scientists decode brain waves to eavesdrop on what we hear
Neuroscientists may one day be able to hear the imagined speech of a patient unable to speak due to stroke or paralysis, according to University of California, Berkeley, researchers. Frequency spectrograms of the actual spoken words (top) and the sounds as reconstructed by two separate models based solely on recorded temporal lobe activity in a volunteer subject.

Health - 31.01.2012
Partnership gives a voice to pressure ulcer patients
A new survey aims to give patients and carers a voice in the search to find the most effective prevention and treatment for pressure ulcers.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2012
Protein study helps superbug battle
Scientists have shed light on the way superbugs such as MRSA are able to become resistant to antibiotics. Researchers have mapped the complex molecular structure of an enzyme found in many bacteria. These molecules - known as restriction enzymes - control the speed at which bacteria can acquire resistance to drugs and eventually become superbugs.

Health - 31.01.2012
Inquests more likely for younger people and deaths from medical care complications
Coroners are more likely to hold inquests for deaths involving younger people or people who died of fatal complications from medical care, according to a study from University of Melbourne experts and published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal.) Coroners must usually be notified of a death if it was violent or unexpected, if the identity of the deceased is not known, or if the deceased was in the custody or care of the state when he or she died.

Environment - Health - 31.01.2012
Climate change history reveals future threats
Climate change history reveals future threats
The historical record foreshadows a grim picture for a future threatened by even greater climate change according to a study from The Australian National University. Professor Tony McMichael from the ANU National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health looked at climate changes and their impacts over the last 6,000 to 7,000 years, as documented in historical, archaeological and fossil records.

Chemistry - Health - 30.01.2012
Portable device will quickly detect pathogens in developing countries
Portable device will quickly detect pathogens in developing countries
Two Cornell professors will combine their inventions to develop a handheld pathogen detector that will give health care workers in the developing world speedy results to identify in the field such pathogens as tuberculosis, chlamydia, gonorrhea and HIV. Using synthetic DNA, Dan Luo, professor of biological and environmental engineering, has devised a method of "amplifying" very small samples of pathogen DNA, RNA or proteins.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.01.2012
Watching the Engine of Life, in Real Time, to Understand How Things Go Wrong
Ruben Gonzalez views ribosomes—the minute particles in cells that make proteins—as the “machines? of life. Naturally, the associate professor of chemistry is interested in watching these little protein-producing factories in real time, especially when they malfunction and cause disease.

Physics - Health - 30.01.2012
A Man of Magnetism
A Man of Magnetism
Reception and service at central level for international students after arrival at KTH. For Master's students For Exchange students At the KTH Symposium, the director of the U.S. Nat

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2012
The Waisman Center: Decades later, what would Harry think?
Last fall, the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison bid successfully for the same National Institutes of Health core grant that the late Harry Waisman first won 45 years ago. Harry Waisman, left, with colleagues C.S. Reiquam and Nathan J. Smith, examine pathology microscope slides in a research lab.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.01.2012
Novartis extends commitment to help achieve final elimination of leprosy
New five-year commitment includes donation of treatments worth an estimated USD 22.5 million and is expected to reach an estimated 850,000 patients Novartis will also intensify efforts to buil

Chemistry - Health - 30.01.2012
Food crops damaged by pollution crossing continents
Man-made air pollution from North America causes Europe to lose 1.2 million tonnes of wheat a year, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Leeds and co-authored by the University of York, shows for the first time the extent of the Northern Hemisphere's intercontinental crop losses caused by ozone - a chemical partly produced by fossil fuels.

Health - Computer Science - 30.01.2012
Project to improve radiotherapy planning
Project to improve radiotherapy planning
A collaborative project between physicists, oncologists and computer scientists at Oxford and Cambridge Universities, launched last month, will develop improved tools for the planning of high precision radiotherapy.

Health - Pedagogy - 30.01.2012
Early intervention may curb dangerous college drinking
Early intervention may curb dangerous college drinking
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. The first few weeks of college are a critical time in shaping students' drinking habits. Now Penn State researchers have a tailored approach that may help prevent students from becoming heavy drinkers. "Research shows there is a spike in alcohol-related consequences that occur in the first few weeks of the semester, especially with college freshmen," said Michael J. Cleveland, research associate at the Prevention Research Center and the Methodology Center.

Health - Innovation - 30.01.2012
Making the Most of Your CT-Scan
X-ray photography has been used for decades for medical purposes. Now, scientists have found new ways of obtaining precise and comprehensive data from x-ray computer tomography.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.01.2012
Addicts’ cravings have different roots in men and women
When it comes to addiction, sex matters. A new brain imaging study by Yale School of Medicine researchers suggests stress robustly activates areas of the brain associated with craving in cocaine-dependent women, while drug cues activate similar brain regions in cocaine-dependent men. The study, expected to be published online Jan.

Health - Economics / Business - 27.01.2012

Health - Event - 27.01.2012

Health - 27.01.2012
U of’T professors perform Ontario's first cardiac stem cell transplant
University of Toronto faculty members performed the first cardiac stem cell transplant in Ontario recently, using stem cells derived from the patient's own bone marrow, isolated completely within the operating room, and implanted into the heart at the time of coronary bypass surgery.

Health - 27.01.2012
The back garden as a cultural environment
A place to relax or a demanding chore? Different people will give different answers to what a garden is.“With gardens, people shape their own personal cultural environments in their backyard”, says r

Health - 27.01.2012
Hope for those with a depressive disposition
Good news for the 13 per cent of the population with depressive personality traits: their negative outlook does not have to be permanent. This has been shown by psychologist Rachel Maddux in new research from Lund University in Sweden. Depression is a serious and sometimes devastating health problem which affects millions of people worldwide.

Health - 27.01.2012
Research into acute asthma attacks boosted with £4m award
Research into acute asthma attacks has been boosted with a £4m award from the Medical Research Council (MRC) and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).

Health - 27.01.2012
Grant to UC San Diego Shiley Eye Center Supports Research in Blinding Eye Diseases
Research to Prevent Blindness (RPB) has awarded a grant of $100,000 to the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to support research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of blinding eye diseases.

Health - History / Archeology - 27.01.2012

Physics - Health - 27.01.2012
ANU people given the order on Australia Day
ANU people given the order on Australia Day
A world-renowned quantum physicist and a researcher working to improve space travel are among the members of the ANU community recognised with 2012 Australia Day honours.

Health - 26.01.2012
Breakthrough treatment successful for patients with blocked arteries
The world's first clinical trial of a new treatment for patients with blocked coronary arteries has shown the novel approach to be safe and to yield promising success rates. The University of Toronto -Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre study involved 20 patients, each with a coronary artery completely blocked by plaque - a condition called chronic total occlusion (CTO).

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2012
Scientists Link Evolved, Mutated Gene Module to Syndromic Autism
A team led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reports that newly discovered mutations in an evolved assembly of genes cause Joubert syndrome, a form of syndromic autism. The findings are published in the January 26 online issue of Science Express . Joubert syndrome is a rare, recessive brain condition characterized by malformation or underdevelopment of the cerebellum and brainstem.

Health - Environment - 26.01.2012
U-M, Sierra Club to study links between outdoor experience, veterans’ mental health
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-For six years, the Sierra Club has organized outdoor trips for U.S. military service members, veterans and their families. Now, the national environmental group is working with the University of Michigan on a research project to measure how those trips affect veterans' mental health.

Health - 26.01.2012
Exploring how a parent’s education can affect the mental health of their offspring
New research sheds light on cycle of low socioeconomic status and depression Could depression in adulthood be tied to a parent's level of education? A new study led by Amélie Quesnel-Vallée, a medical sociologist from McGill University, suggests this is the case.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.01.2012
Rotational Motion of Cells that Plays a Critical Role in Their Normal Development
Rotational Motion of Cells that Plays a Critical Role in Their Normal Development
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a rotational motion in human breast cells that continues through mitosis and enables the cells and their progeny to form sphere-shaped acini. In a study that holds major implications for breast cancer research as well as basic cell biology, scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered a rotational motion that plays a critical role in the ability of breast cells to form the spherical structures in the mammary gland known as acini.

Economics / Business - Health - 26.01.2012
Roche responds to adoption of shareholder rights plan by Illumina Board of Directors
Roche responds to adoption of shareholder rights plan by Illumina Board of Directors Roche today responded to an announcement from Illumina, Inc.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.01.2012
Four Breast Cancer-Related Studies Seeking Participants
UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center researchers examine role of diet and exercise An active lifestyle and a healthy diet can help you feel more energetic, control your weight, help you sleep better, and reduce your risk of many diseases.

Health - Economics / Business - 25.01.2012
Making a ‘contract’ with society: GlaxoSmithKline’s research and development head discusses the company’s ethos
By Tanya Gubbay Wednesday 25 January 2012 The Chairman of Research and Development at one of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies last night shared his insights into the philosophy behind its work, in a distinguished guest lecture at Imperial College Business School.

Health - 25.01.2012
How suppressing the immune system may prevent type 1 diabetes
A new study at Yale School of Medicine has uncovered the mechanism by which a targeted suppression of the immune system may prevent type 1 diabetes or induce sustained remission. The study appears in Science Translational Medicine. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease - the immune system goes into overdrive and attacks the body's normal cells instead of foreign invaders.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2012
New Fluorescent Dyes Highlight Neuronal Activity
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created a new generation of fast-acting fluorescent dyes that optically highlight electrical activity in neuronal membranes. The work is published in this week's online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

Health - Administration - 25.01.2012
Young breast cancer survivors face serious quality-of-life challenges
Young breast cancer survivors face serious quality-of-life challenges
Quality of life in younger patients treated for breast cancer is seriously compromised, and these women face more physical and mental health issues than women their age who haven't had cancer and women over 50 who have, according to a study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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