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Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2010
UC San Diego Researchers Identify Factor Boosting Leukemia’s Aggressiveness
October 22, 2010 By Scott LaFee Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells survive and thrive not just by their own innate wiles, but by also acquiring aid and support from host cells in their surrounding environment.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.10.2010
Plant family tree may help identify species vulnerable to invaders, climates change
Change has been the norm for Wisconsin's forests over the last 50 years, and the next 50 are unlikely to pass quietly.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2010
Dizzy heights pose risks for climbers
Climbers scaling Africa's highest peak need to be more aware of the risks associated with high altitude, researchers warn. More than 25,000 climbers attempt to summit Mount Kilimanjaro each year, which has become an increasingly popular destination. University researchers tested altitude sickness levels among more than 200 climbers making the ascent.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2010
Consortium to design human trials of mosaic HIV vaccine
Consortium to design human trials of mosaic HIV vaccine
The vaccine represents a novel strategy for fighting the virus that causes AIDS by attempting to address one of the most daunting challenges in HIV vaccine design. ...mosaic vaccines are composed of many sets of synthetic, computer-generated sequences of proteins that can prompt the immune system to respond to a wide variety of circulating HIV strains.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 15.10.2010
Music in mind: science and art explore the conscious brain
Music in mind: science and art explore the conscious brain
What are the physical processes in the brain that create conscious thought and memory? How do billions of neurons inside our heads generate the experience of a melody? To illuminate these complex ques

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2010
Oxidative Stress Bioanalytical Facility opens at University of Sydney
Oxidative Stress Bioanalytical Facility opens at University of Sydney
The University of Sydney's Bosch Institute formally opened its Oxidative Stress Bioanalytical Facility (OSBF) this week, located in the Medical Foundation Building.

Life Sciences - Economics / Business - 15.10.2010
Dr Jenny Rohn on why science is vital
UCL biologist Dr Jenny Rohn explains the motivation for her call to arms to protect science research funding that has seen her at Parliament and Downing Street this week.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2010
Scientists find signals that make cell nucleus blow up like a balloon
Video : Frog puppets explain the research in this piece by Professor Rebecca Heald and post-doc Daniel Levy. BERKELEY — Size matters when it comes to the nucleus of a cell, and now scientists have discovered the signals that control how big the nucleus gets. Nuclear size varies not only among different species, but also in different types of cells in the same species and at different times during development.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.10.2010
Faculty Q&A: Feniosky Peña-Mora
Q. We've heard you say that “engineering is the liberal arts of the 21st century.” What do you mean by that? Actually, that's a saying I borrowed from Mort Friedman , [senior vice dean of engineering], who's been saying it for several years.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 13.10.2010
Need a study break to refresh Maybe not, say Stanford researchers
Need a study break to refresh Maybe not, say Stanford researchers
The researchers' findings challenge the long-held theory that willpower is a limited resource that needs to be replenished. BY ADAM GORLICK It could happen to students cramming for exams, people working long hours or just about anyone burning the candle at both ends: Something tells you to take a break.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.10.2010
Scientists secure £244k boost for dementia research
Scientists secure £244k boost for dementia research
The research has been made possible thanks to a grant from the Alzheimer's Research Trust, the UK's leading dementia research charity.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.10.2010
Researchers, the Dalai Lama and the neuroscience of altruism
Researchers, the Dalai Lama and the neuroscience of altruism
Stanford researchers and the Dalai Lama focus on the neuroscience of compassion – an effort that finds a natural ally in Tibetan Buddhism. But Stanford's ties with Tibet go deeper than that. While CCARE's interests may sound technical and complicated, the problems they hope to solve are not: How can we prevent caregiver burnout? Why do some kids become bullies? Can we teach people to be more compassionate? For Doty, the mission is an urgent one: "No longer do I believe compassion and love are luxuries.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.10.2010
Engineer Designs Handheld Device Used to Diagnose Illness
It used to be that villagers in the developing world had to go to a lab to find out if they were positive for HIV and other diseases. Bioengineer Samuel Sia has figured out a way to take the lab to the village. Bioengineer Samuel Sia has designed a handheld device used to collect and analyze blood tests at a patient's bedside to diagnose infectious and other diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.10.2010
Professor Uses Ultrasound to Treat Alzheimer s
Ultrasound, a reverberating pitch too high for the human ear to recognize, has many applications. It can relax the muscles of aching athletes, melt the fat of liposuction patients and remove grime from kitchen utensils.

Life Sciences - 12.10.2010

Physics - Life Sciences - 12.10.2010
A new Concept in Microscopy:
Self-reconstructing Laser Beams - published in ‘Nature Photonics' Researchers at the University of Freiburg are developing a microscope with illuminating beams that actively refocus in a light-scattering medium. Freiburg, 12.10.2010 It's a familiar situation for all car drivers. In the autumn, when the roads are foggy, visibility drops below 50 metres.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.10.2010
International crop science experts join University of Nottingham
International crop science experts join University of Nottingham
PA 275/10 The University of Nottingham has announced the arrival of two of the world's leading experts in crop cytogenetics, further strengthening the University's research priority group for global food security.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.10.2010
Medical Center Professor Discovers Genetic Basis for Hair Loss
“Physician, heal thyself.” That oft-quoted proverb describes the ground-breaking effort by Columbia professor Angela Christiano to discover the cause of the second most common form of hair loss after male-pattern baldness. In 1996, Christiano's hair suddenly began falling out, leaving her scalp riddled with bald patches.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 12.10.2010
Vivian Zayas: 'Attached' to attachment psychology and Ultimate competitions
Vivian Zayas: ’Attached’ to attachment psychology and Ultimate competitions
Vivan Zayas has been playing Ultimate since her sophomore year at Cornell. Now an assistant professor, she travels each weekend to compete with the elite women's team, the Boston Brutes.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.10.2010
Malaria gene linked to drug resistance
Scientists have shed light on how malaria is able to resist treatment with a leading drug. Researchers have identified a gene that enables the parasite that causes the infection to resist treatment with the plant-based remedy artemisinin. In many countries where the parasite has developed resistance to previously effective common treatments such as chloroquine, artemisinin remains the only effective treatment against the infection.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.10.2010
Incest and folk-dancing: why sex survives
Incest and folk-dancing: why sex survives
To launch the 2010/11 season of UCL's Lunch Hour Lectures, Professor of genetics Steve Jones will unravel the taboo subject of incest, arguing that it is much more common than most people think.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.10.2010
New hope for bone cancer treatment
New hope for bone cancer treatment
PA 272/10 Children and young people who are diagnosed with bone cancer could benefit from better treatment in the future thanks to new research at The University of Nottingham.

Life Sciences - 11.10.2010
Study into workplace experiences of people who stutter
Speech pathology researchers from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Health Sciences are calling for participants for an online study that aims to better understand the experiences of people who stutter and how this impacts on their working life.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.10.2010
Using cancer's weapons against it
Health | Science Ed Sykes | 08 Oct 10 Tumours seem to pacify our immune system by tapping into our bodies' codes, but we may be able to use this trick against them in our bid to hunt them down.

Economics / Business - Life Sciences - 07.10.2010
In Wisconsin, 75 percent of economic benefit of Bt corn goes to farmers who don’t plant it
Widespread planting of genetically modified Bt corn throughout the Upper Midwest has suppressed populations of the European corn borer, a major insect pest of corn, with the majority of the economic benefits going to growers who do not plant Bt corn, reports a multistate team of scientists in the Oct.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.10.2010
Researchers develop a better way to see molecules at work in living brain cells
Researchers develop a better way to see molecules at work in living brain cells
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. By creating a better way to see molecules at work in living brain cells, researchers affiliated with MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the MIT Department of Chemistry are helping elucidate molecular mechanisms of synapse formation.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.10.2010
Novartis announces agreement to develop influenza vaccines using revolutionary "synthetic genomics" technology
Novartis announces agreement to develop influenza vaccines using revolutionary "synthetic genomics" technology Collaboration with Synthetic Genomics Vaccines Inc.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.10.2010
Long-extinct passenger pigeon finds a place in the family tree
Long-extinct passenger pigeon finds a place in the family tree
CHAMPAIGN, lll. With bits of DNA extracted from century-old museum specimens, researchers have found a place for the extinct passenger pigeon in the family tree of pigeons and doves, identifying for the first time this unique bird's closest living avian relatives.

Life Sciences - 05.10.2010
Nocturnal ants have evolved night vision: study
Nocturnal ants have evolved night vision: study
Researchers studying the eyes of Australian bull ants have found the first evidence of adaptation of visual structures within a single species to distinct light intensities. The research, led by Dr Ajay Narendra of the Division of Evolution, Ecology and Genetics at The Australian National University, found that the eye structure of the bull ants genus Myrmecia changed according to their role in the colony.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.10.2010
New registry to accelerate research on fragile X syndrome
As researchers delve further into the genetic basis for disease, they face a conundrum: finding enough affected people who can fill out a true picture of mutations that can vary from one person to another.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.10.2010
Two Caltech Scientists Named Among 2010 NIH Director's New Innovator Awardees
Two Caltech Scientists Named Among 2010 NIH Director’s New Innovator Awardees
PASADENA, Calif.—As part of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiative to stimulate highly innovative research and support promising new scientific investigators, two scientists from the

Health - Life Sciences - 04.10.2010
Addition of Immunotherapy Boosts Pediatric Cancer Survival in Children with Neuroblastoma
Sept. 30, 2010 By Jackie Carr Administering a new form of immunotherapy to children with neuroblastoma, a nervous system cancer, increased the percentage of those who were alive and free of disease progression after two years, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and fellow institutions.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.10.2010
Despite Brain Damage, Working Memory Functions Within Limits
October 12, 2010 By Scott LaFee Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, led by Larry R. Squire, PhD, professor of psychiatry, psychology and neurosciences at

Life Sciences - Health - 03.10.2010
McGill partners with leading Swiss neuroscience research group
Building on its worldwide reputation as a leader in neuroscience research, McGill University today joined with two leading Swiss research institutions - the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss F

Health - Life Sciences - 02.10.2010
U-M creates the state’s first human embryonic stem cell line, a milestone on the road to new disease treatments
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—University of Michigan researchers have created the state's first human embryonic stem cell line, achieving a long-sought goal that provides the foundation for future efforts to develop innovative disease treatments.

Life Sciences - 01.10.2010
DirectFuel
The Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg participates in the new EU-funded FP7 collaborative project "Direct biological conversion of solar energy to volatile hydrocarbon fuels by engineered cyanobacter

Life Sciences - Administration - 01.10.2010
Manchester team wins major EU biofuels grant
01 Oct 2010 The European Commission has agreed to fund a project to develop photosynthetic microorganisms that directly convert solar power and carbon dioxide into engine-ready fuel.

Life Sciences - 01.10.2010
Ig Nobel for slime networks
Science Pete Wilton | 01 Oct 10 An experiment to test if slime moulds can design efficient railway networks has won a team, including Oxford University researchers, an Ig Nobel Prize .

Health - Life Sciences - 30.09.2010
Stanford lands research grants for creative scientists and breakthrough projects
Stanford researchers win prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health. Some funding goes to unusually creative investigators at an early stage of their careers; other support goes to risky projects that may produce game-changing results.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.09.2010
NIH Awards $11.5 Million for New Caltech-Led Membrane-Protein Center
NIH Awards $11.5 Million for New Caltech-Led Membrane-Protein Center
PASADENA, Calif.—The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded $11.5 million to a consortium of research institutions led by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) for the creation of a center for the study of membrane-protein structures.

Physics - Life Sciences - 30.09.2010
Graphene may hold key to speeding up DNA sequencing
Graphene may hold key to speeding up DNA sequencing
Researchers from Harvard University and MIT have demonstrated that graphene, a surprisingly robust planar sheet of carbon just one-atom thick, can act as an artificial membrane separating two liquid reservoirs. By drilling a tiny pore just a few-nanometers in diameter, called a nanopore, in the graphene membrane, the researchers were able to measure exchange of ions through the pore and demonstrate that a long DNA molecule can be pulled through the graphene nanopore just as a thread is pulled through the eye of a needle.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.09.2010
Grant to help New Yorkers reduce risky teen behaviors
Grant to help New Yorkers reduce risky teen behaviors
Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) is preparing communities across New York for an innovative system to more effectively deliver research-based programs to prevent substance abuse and risky behavior in young teens.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.09.2010
Study pinpoints ectopic smoke link
Scientists have discovered why women who smoke have a higher risk of developing ectopic pregnancies. Researchers have found that female smokers who have an ectopic pregnancy have raised levels of a protein - called - in their Fallopian tubes, which increases the risk of an egg implanting outside the womb.

Physics - Life Sciences - 27.09.2010
A shot to the heart: Nanoneedle delivers quantum dots to cell nucleus
A shot to the heart: Nanoneedle delivers quantum dots to cell nucleus
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Getting an inside look at the center of a cell can be as easy as a needle prick, thanks to University of Illinois researchers who have developed a tiny needle to deliver a shot right to a cell's nucleus.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.09.2010
Cancer-associated long non-coding RNA regulates pre-mRNA splicing
Cancer-associated long non-coding RNA regulates pre-mRNA splicing
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers report this month that MALAT1, a long non-coding RNA that is implicated in certain cancers, regulates pre-mRNA splicing - a critical step in the earliest stage of protein production. Their study appears in the journal Molecular Cell. Nearly 5 percent of the human genome codes for proteins, and scientists are only beginning to understand the role of the rest of the “non-coding” genome.

Life Sciences - 22.09.2010
Honeybee democracies offer useful insights, says new book
Honeybee democracies offer useful insights, says new book
When honeybees seek a new home, they choose the best site through a democratic process that humans might do well to emulate, says a Cornell biologist in his new book, "Honeybee Democracy" (Princeton University Press).

Health - Life Sciences - 22.09.2010
Stem cell technique offers new potential to treat blindness
Stem cell technique offers new potential to treat blindness
UCL scientists are pioneering a stem cell treatment to replace diseased parts of the retina, which could lead to a future treatment for retinal diseases that affect around 3,000 children in the UK. The researchers from UCL Institute of Child Health and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, also members of the UCL Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, successfully implanted cells from healthy mice into mice with an inherited form of childhood blindness called Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA).

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2010
University of Freiburg launches research project on the digital printing of single biological cells
IMTEK coordinates European project PASCA Freiburg, 21.09.2010 The Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg , is the principal technology partner and project coordinator of the EU Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Development research project PASCA (Platform for Advanced Single Cell Manipulation and Analysis).

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2010
Increased Brain Protein Levels Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease
Elevated levels of a growth protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is linked to impaired neurogenesis, the process by which new neurons are generated, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego in today's edition of The Journal of Neuroscience.

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