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Life Sciences - Health - 06.06.2010
The genetic secrets that allow Tibetans to thrive in thin air
The genetic secrets that allow Tibetans to thrive in thin air
The online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today reports on the work of an international team involving UCL's Professor Hugh Montgomery that has identified a gene that allows Tibetans to live and work more than two miles above sea level without getting altitude sickness. A previous study published 13 May 2010 in Science reported that Tibetans are genetically adapted to high altitude.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.06.2010
The Intriguing World of Seaweeds
Recently, the characterization of brown seaweeds has taken a giant step forward with the decoding of the complete genome of one of these organisms ( Ectocarpus siliculosus ) by an international consortium led by Dr. Mark Cock from the Biological Station Roscoff (Bretagne, France).

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.06.2010
The Intriguing World of Seaweeds
Recently, the characterization of brown seaweeds has taken a giant step forward with the decoding of the complete genome of one of these organisms ( Ectocarpus siliculosus ) by an international consortium led by Dr. Mark Cock from the Biological Station Roscoff (Bretagne, France).

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.06.2010
Freezer Retirement Program: Out with the cold, in with the new
Freezer Retirement Program: Out with the cold, in with the new
Stanford's Department of Sustainability and Energy Management is urging researchers to go green and get rid of their old ultra-low-temperature freezers.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.06.2010
Chemists design new way to fluorescently label proteins
MIT researchers have designed a fluorescent probe that can be targeted to different locations within a cell.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.06.2010
Chemists design new way to fluorescently label proteins
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? Since the 1990s, a green fluorescent protein known simply as GFP has revolutionized cell biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.05.2010
BHF grant renewed for thrombosis research
BHF grant renewed for thrombosis research
Alastair Poole, Professor of Pharmacology and Cell Biology in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, has been awarded a renewal of a programme grant from the British Heart Foundation.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.05.2010
Topping out ceremony for new institute researching disease causes
Topping out ceremony for new institute researching disease causes
A topping out ceremony to mark the completion of the main construction stage of a new institute at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology was carried out by the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University today. The £30 million Oxford Molecular Pathology Institute (OMPI) has been designed jointly by Nightingale Associates and Make Architects.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.05.2010
Genetic information to improve lung cancer risk model
Liverpool, UK - 27 May 2010: Researchers at the University of Liverpool have further improved a risk model that calculates a patient¿s chance of developing lung cancer, with the inclusion of genetic markers that predispose people to the disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.05.2010
Sanofi-aventis establishes strategic alliance with MIT’s Center for Biomedical Innovation
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? Sanofi-aventis announced today a strategic alliance agreement with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Biomedical Innovation, which will be known as the sanofi-aventis Biomedical Innovation Program (SABIP).

Life Sciences - Administration - 25.05.2010
Learning Strategies are Associated with Distinct Neural Signatures
Learning Strategies are Associated with Distinct Neural Signatures
PASADENA, Calif.—The process of learning requires the sophisticated ability to constantly update our expectations of future rewards so we may make accurate predictions about those rewards in the face of a changing environment.

Event - Life Sciences - 25.05.2010

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2010
Major new study into brain ageing
Major new study into brain ageing
Efforts to understand the effects of ageing on the brain have been given a major boost with the announcement of a new £5M grant from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to Cambridge researchers. The funding has been awarded to a team from public health, clinical neurosciences and psychology at the University of Cambridge and scientists from the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit who aim to understand how brain ageing in healthy people affects abilities like language and memory.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.05.2010
UCL study reveals more about our Achilles heel
UCL study reveals more about our Achilles heel
It's a discovery that seems counter-intuitive but researchers from UCL and Liverpool University have found that tendons in high-stress and strain areas, like the Achilles tendon, actually repair themselves less frequently than low-stress tendons. The study, led by Dr Helen Birch (UCL Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine) and published in this week's Journal of Biological Chemistry sheds some light on the increased susceptibility of certain tendons to injury during ageing.

Physics - Life Sciences - 25.05.2010
Nine undergraduates receive Deans’ Award for Academic Accomplishment
Nine undergraduates recently received the 2010 Deans' Award for Academic Accomplishment , which honors students for exceptional, tangible accomplishments in independent research, national academic co

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.05.2010
The Star of Africa’s Savanna Ecosystems May Be the Lowly Termite
Cambridge, Mass. May 25, 2010 - The majestic animals most closely associated with the African savanna - fierce lions, massive elephants, towering giraffes - may be relatively minor players when it comes to shaping the ecosystem. The real king of the savanna appears to be the termite, say ecologists who've found that these humble creatures contribute mightily to grassland productivity in central Kenya via a network of uniformly distributed colonies.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 24.05.2010
Caltech-Led Team First to Directly Measure Body Temperatures of Extinct Vertebrates
PASADENA, Calif.— Was Tyrannosaurus rex cold-blooded? Did birds regulate their body temperatures before or after they began to grow feathers? Why would evolution favor warm-bloodedness when it has such a high energy cost? Questions like these—about when, why, and how vertebrates stopped relying on external factors to regulate their body temperatures and began heating themselves internally—have long intrigued scientists.

Life Sciences - Economics / Business - 23.05.2010

Mathematics - Life Sciences - 21.05.2010
New Royal Society Fellows for 2010
New Royal Society Fellows for 2010
Four researchers from the University of Oxford have been elected as new Fellows of the Royal Society. The new Fellows are Professor Philip Candelas, Professor Georg Gottlob, Professor Robert C Griffiths and Professor Ian Hickson. Professor Philip Candelas is Rouse-Ball Professor of Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute, and a Fellow of Wadham College.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.05.2010
Developing a better way to detect food allergies
Stanford team wins $200,000 MIT Clean Energy Prize with revolutionary electrode design to improve solar panel performance CAMBRIDGE, Mass.

Life Sciences - Administration - 20.05.2010

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.05.2010
Researchers Identify Genes and Brain Centers That Regulate Meal Size in Flies
Researchers Identify Genes and Brain Centers That Regulate Meal Size in Flies
PASADENA, Calif.—Biologists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and Yale University have identified two genes, the leucokinin neuropeptide and the leucokinin receptor, that appear to regulate meal sizes and frequency in fruit flies. Both genes have mammalian counterparts that seem to play a similar role in food intake, indicating that the steps that control meal size and meal frequency are not just behaviorally similar but are controlled by the same genes throughout the animal kingdom.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2010
Suppressing Activity of Common Intestinal Bacteria Reduces Tumor Growth
Mouse studies promising to colon cancer patients who currently have surgery as only option May 10, 2010 By Scott LaFee A team of University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers has

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2010
Gammaglobulin Treatment May Slow Alzheimer’s Disease
UC San Diego Health System Seeking Participants for Nationwide Clinical Trial May 10, 2010 By Debra Kain Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Alzheimer‘s program have begun a Phase III clinical trial testing a new approach to slowing down the progression of Alzheimer's disease using Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIg), also known as gammaglobulin.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.05.2010
New laser lab launches
New laser lab launches
In video interviews, Imperial scientists explain how the state-of-the-art technology will help their research - News By Lucy Goodchild Tuesday 18 May 2010 A new laser laboratory that will help scientists see how proteins become activated at a molecular level launched at Imperial College London on 29 April 2010.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.05.2010

Physics - Life Sciences - 17.05.2010

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.05.2010

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.05.2010
IYBD at UCL: The treasures of evolution
IYBD at UCL: The treasures of evolution
In this short film, palaeobiologist Dr Anjali Goswami (UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment and UCL Earth Sciences) explains what we can learn about biodiversity from the collection housed at UCL's Grant Museum of Zoology.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.05.2010
IYBD at UCL: Protecting the primates of Gashaka
IYBD at UCL: Protecting the primates of Gashaka
In this short film, Professor Volker Sommer (UCL Anthropology) discusses his work in West Africa, where he has founded a unique project to protect the area's primates.

Life Sciences - 13.05.2010

Health - Life Sciences - 13.05.2010
Children with epilepsy say their quality of life is better than their parents think
Children with epilepsy often face multiple challenges ? not only seizures but learning, cognitive and school difficulties, side effects from medication, and, not surprisingly, social stigma from their peers. It's no wonder parents say their children with epilepsy have a substantially worse quality of life than their other, healthy children.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.05.2010
Paul Terasaki donates $50 million to UCLA's Life Sciences
Paul Terasaki donates $50 million to UCLA’s Life Sciences
Paul Ichiro Terasaki, who as a teenager and young adult worked as a busboy, gardener and handyman and who spent three years interned with his family in a Japanese American relocation camp during Worl

Event - Life Sciences - 12.05.2010

Health - Life Sciences - 11.05.2010
Research Team Develops Novel Strategy to Destroy Tumors
Research Team Develops Novel Strategy to Destroy Tumors
May 12, 2010 — Miami — Harnessing the immune system is emerging as one of the most promising new ways to fight cancer. Most cancer cells are eliminated by the immune system; however, over a lifetime, a few may escape this immune surveillance and lead to tumors and metastases. Hence a formidable opportunity has been to find ways to make the immune system recognize the tumor as a foreign body and trigger a response.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.05.2010
Swiss scientists sequence fire blight genome
Swiss scientists sequence fire blight genome
Wädenswil, 11.05.2010 - Researchers at Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil ACW have published the first complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

Economics / Business - Life Sciences - 11.05.2010

Media - Life Sciences - 11.05.2010
After a Painful Loss, Graduate Begins New Career in Journalism
Four years ago, Artis Henderson was an Army wife living with her mother in Florida while waiting for her new husband to complete a tour in Iraq.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.05.2010
Neuroscience symposium unites researchers across UCL
Neuroscience symposium unites researchers across UCL
Where do you go to find a neuroscientist at UCL? The answer might not be as straightforward as you think.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2010
Professor Brian Prichard: Deacon, Mayor and cardiovascular pioneer
His friend and colleague Professor Raymond Macallister (UCL Division of Medicine) pays tribute to his varied and groundbreaking work in the fields of cardiovascular medicine, alcohol studies and his close involvement with the local community.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2010

Life Sciences - 06.05.2010
Red crabs lead the way in endurance running
Red crabs lead the way in endurance running
Not even professional athletes would consider running a marathon without any training, but this is essentially what Christmas Island red crabs do every year, according to new research from the University of Bristol. Native to Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, the red land crabs ( Gecarcoidea natalis ) spend the dry season relatively inactive in their rainforest burrows.  When the monsoon comes, they embark on an annual five-kilometre breeding migration to the ocean.  In a test of great endurance, the crabs travel for up to 12 hours over five days before finally reaching their destination.

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