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Life Sciences - Computer Science - 28.11.2011
New database for vital model organism launched
New database for vital model organism launched
An important novel component of this project is the construction of intuitive tools to allow the research community to involve itself in database curation, and ensure that the scientific information published in their papers is visible to the entire biological research community." —Steve Oliver, Professor of Systems Biology & Biochemistry, who is spearheading the initiative A new database promises to be an invaluable resource to scientists who use a unique single-celled fungus to study human diseases.

Life Sciences - 28.11.2011
Protein lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase activity of Sirt5.
Protein lysine desuccinylase and demalonylase activity of Sirt5.
Sirt5 Is a NAD-Dependent Protein Lysine Demalonylase and Desuccinylase. Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) proteins (sirtuins) are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylases that regulate important biological processes.

Life Sciences - 28.11.2011
Baycrest’s amazing Virtual Brain
Randy McIntosh's brain isn't very smart. It's about as astute as your average three-year-old. But it's getting smarter every day. Housed in a supercomputing data centre, this "brain" is actually a model created by the Brain Network Recovery Group (Brain NRG), a consortium of 16 universities. McIntosh, a psychology professor at U of T, vice-president of research at Baycrest and director of Baycrest's Rotman Research Institute, helped found Brain NRG.

Life Sciences - 28.11.2011
Warwick’s super computer seeks way to mimic mollusc shell
Warwick's super computer seeks way to mimic mollusc shell One of the first tasks for Warwick's new 1.3 million super computer is to use its monster megabytes to analyse the natural properties of the tiny mollusc shell.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2011
Humans And Climate Both Contributed To Large Ice-Age Mammal Extinction
Humans And Climate Both Contributed To Large Ice-Age Mammal Extinction
Football head coach search committee formed University launches hotline for reporting abuse Student government leaders to host forum for students, administrators Penn State faculty offer teachable mo

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.11.2011
Ancient environment found to drive marine biodiversity
Much of our knowledge about past life has come from the fossil record — but how accurately does that reflect the true history and drivers of biodiversity on Earth? "It's a question that goes back a long way to the time of Darwin, who looked at the fossil record and tried to understand what it tells us about the history of life," says Shanan Peters , an assistant professor of geoscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.11.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 24.11.2011
Improved cancer genetic testing hope
Improved cancer genetic testing hope
WELSH patients are among the first taking part in a pioneering initiative to demonstrate how genetic tests could help match NHS cancer patients to the most appropriate treatment.

Life Sciences - 24.11.2011
Realising Their Potential: Children in Care Check Out Cambridge
Realising Their Potential: Children in Care Check Out Cambridge
This year's October half-term, which coincided with National Care Leavers Week, saw 159 young people in care visit Cambridge for an experience of higher education.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.11.2011
Two NSW Science and Engineering Award winners
Two NSW Science and Engineering Award winners
A professor who has led Australia's battle against the cane toad, and a researcher who led a novel, open source research project resulting in medicine for a disease that afflicts millions of the world's poorest people, have been honoured in the NSW Science and Engineering Awards.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.11.2011
They call it 'guppy love': UCLA biologists solve an evolution mystery
They call it ’guppy love’: UCLA biologists solve an evolution mystery
Guppies in the wild have evolved over at least half-a-million years — long enough for the males' coloration to have changed dramatically.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.11.2011
This House Knows When You Need Help
Located on the 12th floor of the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network is a new home.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 21.11.2011
Two for joy
Two for joy
An innovative dance performance with creative input from Professor Nicky Clayton, a expert on bird cognition, goes on tour this week.

Life Sciences - 21.11.2011
Insect cyborgs may become first responders, search and monitor hazardous environs
ANN ARBOR, Mich.-Research conducted at the University of Michigan College of Engineering may lead to the use of insects to monitor hazardous situations before sending in humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2011
MIT and Pfizer break ground on new research units in Kendall Square
10-year lease marks a strategic partnership between the academic research community and industry to boost innovation; building completion expected at end of 2013 NEW YORK, N.Y.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2011
Tuning out: How brains benefit from meditation
Experienced meditators seem to be able switch off areas of the brain associated with daydreaming as well as psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, according to a new brain imaging study by Yale researchers. Meditation's ability to help people stay focused on the moment has been associated with increased happiness levels, said Judson A. Brewer, assistant professor of psychiatry and lead author of the study published the week of Nov.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.11.2011
Implanted neurons, grown in the lab, take charge of brain circuitry
Among the many hurdles to be cleared before human embryonic stem cells can achieve their therapeutic potential is determining whether or not transplanted cells can functionally integrate into target organs or tissues. Writing today (Monday, Nov. 21) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , a team of Wisconsin scientists reports that neurons, forged in the lab from blank slate human embryonic stem cells and implanted into the brains of mice, can successfully fuse with the brain's wiring and both send and receive signals.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2011
Testing Antioxidant Drugs is Transparent
A study using genetically modified zebrafish to visualize early events involved in development of human atherosclerosis describes an efficient model - one that the researchers say offers many applications for testing the potential effectiveness of new antioxidant and dietary therapies. The research, led by scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has been published online by the Journal of Clinical Investigation , and will appear in print in the December 1 issue of the journal.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.11.2011
Chicken virus gives insight into cancers
Fresh discoveries about a disease commonly found in chickens could improve our understanding of some types of cancers in people. The study into Marek's disease could also have major implications for the poultry industry, making it possible to breed birds with greater resistance to the disease. Analysing genes Scientists analysed thousands of genes to pinpoint those that play a role in Marek's disease - a viral infection that costs the global poultry industry more than 1.4 billion a year.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.11.2011
Old Drugs Find New Target For Treating Brain Tumor
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, in collaboration with colleagues in Boston and South Korea, say they have identified a novel gene mutation that causes at least one form of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common type of malignant brain tumor.

Life Sciences - 18.11.2011
Optimal qPCR primer design.
Optimal qPCR primer design.
GETPrime: a gene- or transcript-specific primer database for quantitative real-time PCR.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2011
A consequence of the thalidomide disaster
A consequence of the thalidomide disaster
It is some fifty years since the thalidomide disaster when several thousand children around the world were born with severe limb defects after their mothers had been given thalidomide as sedative and remedy for morning sickness.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.11.2011
UN warns cassava virus, first identified by Bristol researchers, nearing an epidemic in Africa
UN warns cassava virus, first identified by Bristol researchers, nearing an epidemic in Africa
A virus that attacks the cassava plant - estimated to be the world's third most important staple crop - is reaching epidemic proportions in parts of Africa, UN scientists warned today.

Life Sciences - Physics - 17.11.2011
Ultra-Microscope Unveils Secrets of the Fruit Fly
An Advanced Microscopy Method Used at the Vienna University of Technology allows Scientists to Study the Genetics of the Fruit Fly.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.11.2011
New Drug Combo Targets Multiple Cancers
Sugar molecule primes cancer cells for early death from second compound Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Kyushu University Medical School say a novel combination of a specific sugar molecule with a pair of cell-killing drugs prompts a wide variety of cancer cell types to kill themselves, a process called apoptosis or programmed cell death.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.11.2011
Vaccine offers hope to poorest farmers
A new approach to vaccinating cattle could help farmers worldwide, research suggests. Scientists have developed a technique using a harmless parasite, which lives in cows but has no effect on their health, to carry medicines into the animals' bloodstream.

Life Sciences - 16.11.2011
Why near-death events are tricks of mind
Near-death experiences are not paranormal but triggered by a change in normal brain function, according to researchers. Psychologists who reviewed a range of phenomena such as out-of-body experiences, visions of tunnels of light or encounters with dead relatives, say they are tricks of the mind rather than a glimpse of the afterlife.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
Search for new cancer treatment
Search for new cancer treatment
University scientists have been awarded 216,500 by the charity Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research to investigate mutations that cause the development of leukaemia.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.11.2011
Gifted 14-year-old scientist conducts research at Cornell
Gifted 14-year-old scientist conducts research at Cornell
Could your discarded jack-o'-lantern be repurposed... as a water purifier? That's what one young scientist has come to Cornell to find out.

Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
Gene Regulatory Networks - Methods and Protocols
Gene Regulatory Networks - Methods and Protocols
Gene regulatory networks play a vital role in organismal development and function by controlling gene expression. With the availability of complete genome sequences, several novel experimental and computational approaches have recently been developed which promise to significantly enhance our ability to comprehensively characterize these regulatory networks by enabling the identification of respectively their genomic or regulatory state components, or the interactions between these two in unprecedented detail.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
Blood Pressure and Stroke Risk Gets More Complicated
For patients who have suffered an ischemic stroke, traditional treatment prescribes keeping subsequent blood pressure levels as low as possible to reduce the risk of another stroke. A new international study, however, suggests this conventional approach may not be helpful, and could actually increase recurrent stroke risk - at least in the first few months after the first event.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
Harm not those strangers that pollinate, study warns
Harm not those strangers that pollinate, study warns
by Morgan Kelly In an irony of nature, invasive species can become essential to the very ecosystems threatened by their presence, according to a recent discovery that could change how scientists and governments approach the restoration of natural spaces.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
New mouthwash targeting harmful bacteria may render tooth decay a thing of the past
New mouthwash targeting harmful bacteria may render tooth decay a thing of the past
A new mouthwash developed by a microbiologist at the UCLA School of Dentistry is highly successful in targeting the harmful Streptococcus mutans bacteria that is the principal cause tooth decay and cavities.

Life Sciences - 15.11.2011
Mimicking the brain, in silicon
New computer chip models how neurons communicate with each other at synapses. For decades, scientists have dreamed of building computer systems that could replicate the human brain's talent for learning new tasks.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.11.2011
Is a stranger genetically wired to be trustworthy You’ll know in 20 seconds
There's definitely something to be said for first impressions. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests it can take just 20 seconds to detect whether a stranger is genetically inclined to being trustworthy, kind or compassionate.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.11.2011
New treatment for multiple sclerosis: Cambridge University translates research at the bench into a drug at the bedside
New treatment for multiple sclerosis: Cambridge University translates research at the bench into a drug at the bedside
New treatment for multiple sclerosis: Cambridge University translates research at the bench into a drug at the bedside CARE-MS2 represents the culmination of many years clinical and laboratory research aimed at demonstrating the potential for alemtuzumab as a highly effective treatment for multiple sclerosis and understanding mechanisms involved in the complex natural history of the disease.

Life Sciences - 14.11.2011
Essential role of inhibitory plasticity in cortical circuitry.
Essential role of inhibitory plasticity in cortical circuitry.
Inhibitory Plasticity Balances Excitation and Inhibition in Sensory Pathways and Memory Networks. Cortical neurons receive balanced excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.11.2011
A More Flexible Window Into the Brain
PHILADELPHIA - A team of researchers co-led by the University of Pennsylvania has developed and tested a new high-resolution, ultra-thin device capable of recording brain activity from the cortical surface without having to use penetrating electrodes. The device could make possible a whole new generation of brain-computer interfaces for treating neurological and psychiatric illness and research.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 11.11.2011
Better muscles thanks to a genetic knock-out
A team of researchers has improved the muscle structure and stamina of mice and nematodes by reducing the function of a natural inhibitor, suggesting treatments for age-related or genetically caused muscle degeneration are within reach. If they weren't held back by the effect of a natural inhibitor, our muscles would be stronger, more powerful and better formed than they are in reality.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.11.2011
Researchers closer to the super bug puzzle
Infectious diseases specialists from Austin Health are working closely with Microbiologists from the University of Melbourne to understand how Staph is becoming resistant to all antibiotic therapies. The treatment of serious infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (Golden Staph) is complicated by the development of antibiotic resistance.

Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Tales from the Crypt: Penn Study on Gut Cell Regeneration Reconciles Long-Standing Research Controversy
PHILADELPHIA - The lining of the intestine regenerates itself every few days as compared to say red blood cells that turn over every four months.

Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Forums set to hear research compliance experiences
The Faculty Senate's Research, Safety and Compliance Oversight Committee will hold a series of forums to hear from faculty and staff on their experiences with research oversight.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
“Parkinsonian” Worms May Hold the Key to Identifying Drugs for Parkinson’s Disease, Says Scientist
AUSTIN, Texas — Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have devised a simple test, using dopamine-deficient worms, for identifying drugs that may help people with Parkinson's disease.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
E. coli could convert sugar to biodiesel at 'an extraordinary rate,' say Stanford researchers
E. coli could convert sugar to biodiesel at ’an extraordinary rate,’ say Stanford researchers
Researchers studying how biodiesel can be generated using E. coli as a catalyst have determined the bacteria have what it takes to produce high volumes of the fuel.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Knocking Out Key Protein in Mice Boosts Insulin Sensitivity
By knocking out a key regulatory protein, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland dramatically boosted insulin sensitivity in lab mice, an achievement that opens a new door for drug development and the treatment of diabetes.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Stem cell research hopes to repair brain cell damage of Parkinson’s disease
Australian scientists have developed a new technique using stem cells, in the hope to replace damaged cells in Parkinson's disease.

Physics - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Puzzled by uranium
Puzzled by uranium
In sites scattered across the Earth, the extraction and processing of uranium for nuclear fuel and weapons has left aquifers contaminated. Immobilizing the contaminant through the action of bacteria has been considered a potential solution to limit its transport away from the contamination site. A recent article by Professor Rizlan Bernier-Latmani and collaborators, published last week in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, points to new unknowns and paints a more complex picture.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.11.2011
Launch of collaborative infection research institute
Launch of collaborative infection research institute
The Bloomsbury Institute for Pathogen Research (BiPR), a joint venture between UCL and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), was launched this week.

Life Sciences - 09.11.2011
Whiskers marked milestone in evolution of mammals from reptiles
Whiskers marked milestone in evolution of mammals from reptiles
Whiskers marked milestone in evolution of mammals from reptiles Research from the University of Sheffield comparing rats and mice with their distance relatives the marsupial, suggests that moveable whiskers were an important milestone in the evolution of mammals from reptiles.