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Life Sciences - Health - 08.11.2011
Autism Linked with Excess of Neurons in Prefrontal Cortex
A study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego Autism Center of Excellence shows that brain overgrowth in boys with autism involves an abnormal, excess number of neurons in areas of the brain associated with social, communication and cognitive development. The scientists discovered a 67 percent excess of cortical cells - a type of brain cell only made before birth - in children with autism.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
Sainsbury Laboratory wins World’s Best Learning Building award
Sainsbury Laboratory wins World’s Best Learning Building award
The Sainsbury Laboratory has been acclaimed as the World's Best Learning Building 2011 at the World Architecture Festival in Barcelona.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
Research promises five-fold reduction in footrot among sheep
Researchers at the University of Warwick have shown that proper management of footrot could cut lameness from one in ten to one in fifty sheep.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
Nobel Laureate opens international cancer conference
Nobel Laureate opens international cancer conference
Nobel Laureate Sir Tim Hunt opened the first ever international meeting on bacterial infection as a cause of cancer, held at King's College London recently.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
Frog trade linked to emergence of killer fungus
Adapted from a news release issued by the Natural Environment Research Council. Photo: Matthew Fisher Monday 7 November 2011 The global trade in frogs, toads and other amphibians may have accidentally helped create and spread the deadly fungal disease, chytridiomycosis. Researchers say that unless the trade is regulated, even deadlier strains of the disease may soon emerge, further devastating amphibian populations worldwide.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 08.11.2011
Galaxy DNA-analysis software is now available in the cloud
Galaxy - an open-source, Web-based platform for data-intensive biomedical and genetic research - is now available as a cloud computing resource. A team of researchers including Anton Nekrutenko, an associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State; Kateryna Makova, an associate professor of biology at Penn State; and James Taylor from Emory University, developed the new technology that will help scientists and biomedical researchers to harness such tools as DNA-sequencing and analysis software, as well as storage capacity for large quantities of scientific data.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
Gates grant helps work on childhood malnutrition
Gates grant helps work on childhood malnutrition
If Shu Ning Bian's undergraduate engineering project comes to fruition, newborn babies in the developing world will stand a better chance of staving off malnutrition.

Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
The rules of social interaction: attraction, repulsion and one close neighbour
The rules of social interaction: attraction, repulsion and one close neighbour
There are three rules that govern social interactions: attraction, repulsion and the actions of one close neighbour. Or at least that's the case for the social interactions of large groups of animals and their movement in synchronised formations, as found by James Herbert-Read, Tim Schaerf and Associate Professor Ashley Ward, from the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Sydney.

Life Sciences - 08.11.2011
New algal research journal has LANL scientists at the helm
New algal research journal has LANL scientists at the helm
Algal Research will cover all areas of emerging technologies in algal biology, biomass production, cultivation, harvesting, extraction, bioproducts, and econometrics.

Event - Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
Frances Ashcroft wins top women in science award
Frances Ashcroft wins top women in science award
Professor Frances Ashcroft has won the top award in the L'ORéAL-UNESCO For Women in Science Awards for 2012.

Life Sciences - 07.11.2011

Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
Monkey mothers key to reproductive success of sons
Monkey mothers key to reproductive success of sons
If you are a male human, nothing puts a damper on romantic success like having your mother in tow. If you are a male northern muriqui monkey, however, mom's presence may be your best bet to find and successfully mate with just the right girl at the right time. In a study of wild primates, reported this week (Nov.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
UW study will explore anemia
To say a pregnant woman is eating for two leaves out a few guests at the table — trillions of them, according to Christopher Coe, a University of Wisconsin-Madison psychology professor.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
Biological futures initiative aims to bring larger ethical issues into non-medical science
Biological futures initiative aims to bring larger ethical issues into non-medical science
Emerging Issues in Biological Futures II: A Panel Discussion on Global Health will be presented from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Nov.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 07.11.2011
Easily ’Re-programmable cells’ could be key in creation of new life forms
PA 345/11 Scientists at The University of Nottingham are leading an ambitious research project to develop an in vivo biological cell-equivalent of a computer operating system.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
SEK 73 million in science and technology research funding
The Swedish Research Council has reached the decision to grant SEK 73 million (EUR8 million) in funding to 27 new research projects within the natural sciences and technology at Umeå University.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
Research aims to prevent diabetic kidney failure
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. The enzyme arginase-2 plays a major role in kidney failure, and blocking the action of this enzyme might lead to protection against renal disease in diabetes, according to researchers. "We believe these arginase inhibitors may be one of the new targets that can slow down the progression of, or even prevent the development of, end-stage renal disease," said Alaa S. Awad, assistant professor of nephrology, Penn State College of Medicine.

Life Sciences - 06.11.2011
Insects dine out on wild feast
Insects dine out on wild feast
Watching a dead animal rot may not sound like everyone's idea of fun but for insect expert Sarah Beynon it can provide a feast of information.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 04.11.2011
Team to showcase its science research in an international competition
Over the past six months, a team of undergraduate scientists has learned firsthand that fierce competition and friendly collaboration sometimes combine in winning ways.

Life Sciences - Event - 04.11.2011
Alice’s Wonderland inspires science’s Wondermind
Psychologists, inspired by Lewis Carroll's enduring stories of Alice in Wonderland, have developed an interactive website to help children learn about science and the human brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
First Proof of Principle for Treating Rare Bone Disease
PHILADELPHIA - Scientists at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine Center for Research in FOP and Related Disorders have developed a new genetic approach to specifically block the damaged copy of the gene for a rare bone disease, while leaving the normal copy untouched. Lead author Josef Kaplan, PhD, postdoctoral fellow; and senior authors Eileen M. Shore, PhD , and Frederick S. Kaplan, MD , both from the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, published this new proof-of-principle approach for treating the disease, called FOP, in the online edition of Gene Therapy .

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Obituary: Bernard Sarnat, 99, UCLA professor, pioneer in field of craniofacial biology
Obituary: Bernard Sarnat, 99, UCLA professor, pioneer in field of craniofacial biology
Bernard G. Sarnat, D.D.S., an eminent plastic surgeon and research scientist who made pioneering contributions to the understanding of craniofacial development and the causes of facial deformities, died Oct.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
University of Birmingham expert spearheads campaign to boost antibiotic research
A top UK microbiologist from the University of Birmingham is championing a major campaign calling for urgent new investment in antibiotic research.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.11.2011
Join U of M lion researchers in bringing the Serengeti to the web
Join U of M lion researchers in bringing the Serengeti to the web
"Crowdfunding" strategy relies on small donations MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (11/03/2011) —Imagine being an invisible presence in Serengeti National Park, watching lions, zebras, wildebeests and hyenas stroll a couple of feet away, with no idea that you are watching them.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2011
Researchers identify brain cells responsible for keeping us awake
Bright light arouses us. Bright light makes it easier to stay awake. Very bright light not only arouses us but is known to have antidepressant effects.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Unravelling the causes of the Ice Age megafauna extinctions
Was it humans or climate change that caused the extinctions of the iconic Ice Age mammals (megafauna) such as the woolly rhinoceros and woolly mammoth?

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Adolescent amphetamine use linked to permanent changes in brain function and behaviour
Amphetamine use in adolescence can cause neurobiological imbalances and increase risk-taking behaviour, and these effects can persist into adulthood, even when subjects are drug free. These are the conclusions of a new study using animal models conducted by McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) researcher Gabriella Gobbi and her colleagues.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Researchers awarded grants to help sick babies and children
Three leading research teams at the University of Bristol have been given more than £400,000 in grants to carry out studies which aim to help reduce the suffering of sick babies and children.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2011
Biologists Use Flies and Mice to Get to the Heart of Down Syndrome
A novel study involving fruit flies and mice has allowed biologists to identify two critical genes responsible for congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome, a major cause of infant mortality and death in people born with this genetic disorder.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Climate change and humans caused extinction of Ice Age mammals
Climate change and humans caused extinction of Ice Age mammals
In the largest study of its kind, scientists including the University of Sydney's Simon Ho have unravelled the factors that caused the extinction of iconic Ice Age mammals such as the woolly rhinoceros and woolly mammoth. The study shows that both climate change and humans were responsible for the mass extinctions of large mammals - called megafauna - 50,000 years ago.

Physics - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
Lord Rees explores 'limits of science' in Romanes Lecture
Lord Rees explores 'limits of science' in Romanes Lecture
Lord Rees explored the limits of our current understanding of science, whether there are intrinsic limits to our scientific understanding, and the factors limiting how science is applied, at Oxford University's Romanes Lecture on Wednesday 2 November 2011.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
New medication effectively treats underlying cause of cystic fibrosis
A new study has confirmed that the drug, ivacaftor ( VX-770), significantly improves lung function in some people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The results of the phase III clinical trial study, "A CFTR Potentiator in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis and the G551D Mutation,” led by Bonnie W. Ramsey of Seattle Children's Research Institute and the UW were published today, Nov.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
Hospital tests reveal the secrets of an Egyptian mummy
Hospital tests reveal the secrets of an Egyptian mummy
CHAMPAIGN, lll. An ancient Egyptian mummy has had quite an afterlife, traveling more than 6,000 miles, spending six decades in private hands, and finally, in 1989, finding a home at the World Heritage Museum (now the Spurlock Museum) at the University of Illinois. The mummy's travels did not end there, however.

Administration - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011

Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
Genome-scale Network of Rice Genes to Speed the Development of Biofuel Crops
Genome-scale Network of Rice Genes to Speed the Development of Biofuel Crops
The first genome-scale model for predicting the functions of genes and gene networks in a grass species has been developed by an international team of researches that includes scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), a multi-institutional partnership led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
Humans and climate contributed to extinctions of large Ice-Age mammals
Humans and climate contributed to extinctions of large Ice-Age mammals
The history of six large herbivores - the woolly rhinoceros, woolly mammoth, wild horse, reindeer, bison, and musk ox - is the subject of a study by an international group of scientists investigating how climate fluctuations and human activity affected mammal populations at the end of the last ice age.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Daughter cells receive the same number of chromosomes
Scientists at Warwick Medical School have uncovered the molecular process of how cells are by-passing the body's inbuilt 'health checkpoint' with cells that carry unequal numbers of chromosomes that have a higher risk of developing cancer. Studying simple yeast cells, scientists now understand the mechanism by which cells ensure their daughter cells receive the correct number of chromosomes.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.11.2011
Pulsating Response to Stress in Bacteria
Pulsating Response to Stress in Bacteria
If the changing seasons are making it chilly inside your house, you might just turn the heater on. That's a reasonable response to a cold environment: switching to a toastier and more comfortable state until it warms up outside. And so it's no surprise that biologists have long thought cells would respond to their environment in a similar way.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
NSF funds graphene project, supports women in nanoscience
Research into new applications for graphene, as well as supporting women who work in the field of nanoelectronics, will result from a new National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to Cornell.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Cancer-causing bacterium spurs cell death
Cancer-causing bacterium spurs cell death
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers report they have figured out how the cancer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori attacks a cell's energy infrastructure, sparking a series of events in the cell that ultimately lead it to self-destruct. H. pylori are the only bacteria known to survive in the human stomach.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 01.11.2011
Hippocampus Plays Bigger Memory Role Than Previously Thought
Human memory has historically defied precise scientific description, its biological functions broadly but imperfectly defined in psychological terms. In a pair of papers published in the November 2 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience , researchers at the University of California, San Diego report a new methodology that more deeply parses how and where certain types of memories are processed in the brain, and challenges earlier assumptions about the role of the hippocampus.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Not all women in breast cancer families share high risk
Mothers, sisters and daughters from breast cancer families with known genetic mutations do not all share the same high risk of developing the disease, according to a new international study involving the University of Melbourne. Women with the breast cancer genetic mutations BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at least 10 times more likely to develop breast cancer than the average woman.

Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Switching Senses
Switching Senses
Many meat-eating animals have unique ways of hunting down a meal using their senses. To find a tasty treat, bats use echolocation, snakes rely on infrared vision, and owls take advantage of the concave feathers on their faces, the better to help them hear possible prey. Leeches have not just one but two distinct ways of detecting dinner, and, according to new findings from biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), their preferred method changes as they age.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 01.11.2011
Learning Center at UC San Diego Wins $18-Million Renewal
How do humans learn, and how is the element of time critical for learning? The Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center (TDLC), headquartered at UC San Diego in the Institute for Neural Computation, is helping to answer that question, thanks in part to an $18 million renewal grant from the National Science Foundation.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2011
Biotech Innovator Jonathan Rothberg To Speak at Carnegie Mellon Nov. 3
CMU Alumnus, Trustee's Work on DNA Sequencing Could Lead to Treatments for Genetic Diseases : Ken Walters / 412-268-1151 / walters1 [a] andrew.cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—Jonathan Rothberg (E

Psychology - Life Sciences - 31.10.2011
Exploring the science and nuance of facial perception
Exploring the science and nuance of facial perception
  Alexander Todorov, an associate professor of psychology and public affairs at Princeton University, has designed a new freshman seminar, "The Face: The Forces That Shape How We Perceive Others," to

Health - Life Sciences - 31.10.2011
A dog's life: £500k study launched into man's best friend
A dog’s life: £500k study launched into man’s best friend
31 Oct 2011 University of Manchester researchers have launched one of the largest studies into the relationship between man and his 'best friend' to explore how humans have influenced the characteristics of domestic dogs through breeding, feeding, training and socialising.

Linguistics / Literature - Life Sciences - 31.10.2011
Creating impact through cultural collaborations
Creating impact through cultural collaborations
King's has hosted a meeting of minds with some of its key cultural partners to develop new ideas for how the sector can work with the academic community.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.10.2011
Golden opportunity for muscle disorders
Golden opportunity for muscle disorders
Finding treatments or even a cure for lifelong, unrelenting muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy and motor neuron disease will be the focus of a new national research centre.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2011
Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function
Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function
By looking at antibodies, researchers can identify where, in a cell, genes are active and under what conditions they increase or decrease their expression. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 31, 2011—A National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division could help unravel the gnarly secrets of how many human genes function.