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Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2011
Unfolding amyloid secrets
Unfolding amyloid secrets
By pin-pointing the reaction that kick-starts the formation of amyloid fibres, scientists can now seek to further understand how these fibrils develop and cause disease. Amyloid fibres, which are implicated in a wide range of diseases, form when proteins misfold and stick together in long, rope-like structures.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.01.2011
Decline of northern flying squirrel symptom of ailing ecosystem
By David Pacchioli Research/Penn State Northern flying squirrels are rapidly disappearing from Pennsylvania forests.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 20.01.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2011
Watch: Landmark larynx transplant 
Watch: Landmark larynx transplant 
Links: Professor Martin Birchall The Wellcome Trust UC Davis Health System UCL Partners UCL Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine In one of the most complex transplant surgeries ever perfor

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2011
3D way to better antibiotics
3D way to better antibiotics
Science | Health Pete Wilton | 19 Jan 11 Seeing the interaction between antibiotics and the bugs they are designed to attack in three dimensions could help combat drug-resistant bacteria.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2011
Stem cell research and ethics in the spotlight at public event
Foreign stem cell clinics must be regulated – but not at the cost of medical innovation, says a University of Manchester academic who is speaking at a public meeting this evening.

Life Sciences - Physics - 18.01.2011
Understanding the nanomachines of life
Understanding the nanomachines of life
Ribosomes are the protein factories of the living cell and themselves very complex biomolecules. Now, a research group has succeeded in determining the structure of the ribosome found in yeast cells. This is the first time that the ribosome structure has been determined in a eukaryotic cell - a complex cell containing a cell nucleus.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2011
Chemists document workings of key staph enzyme and how to block it
Chemists document workings of key staph enzyme and how to block it
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Researchers have determined the structure and mechanism of an enzyme that performs the crucial first step in the formation of cholesterol and a key virulence factor in staph bacteria.

Life Sciences - 17.01.2011
Nottingham athletes to take on the worlds best in Turkey
PA 15/11 Three athletes from The University of Nottingham are to compete in the 25 th Winter Universiade — an event second only to the Olympics as the largest multi-discipline winter sports competition.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2011
Scientists find the “master switch” for key immune cells in inflammatory diseases
Scientists find the “master switch” for key immune cells in inflammatory diseases
Under embargo until 1800 London time, Sunday 16 January 2011 Scientists have identified a protein that acts as a “master switch? in certain white blood cells, determining whether they promote or inhibit inflammation. The study, published Immunology , could help researchers look for new treatments for diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis that involve excessive inflammation.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 16.01.2011
See how they grow: Monitoring single bacteria without a microscope
Click here for higher-resolution version of the image.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2011
Liverpool receives $1.5million to tackle disease in Africa
Liverpool receives $1.5million to tackle disease in Africa
Liverpool, UK - 14 January 2011: A University of Liverpool-led consortium has received $1.5million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a bacterium that causes serious disease and epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 is one of the most prevalent strains in sub-Sahara Africa.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.01.2011
Warming climate means red deer rutting season arrives early
Warming climate means red deer rutting season arrives early
Wild red deer on the Isle of Rum, which were featured in the BBC TV series Autumnwatch, are rutting earlier in the year, a study shows. Scientists believe the annual rutting season on the Isle of Rum could be changing because of warming spring and summer temperatures. The study shows that the rutting and calving seasons are now up to two weeks earlier on average compared with 30 years ago.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.01.2011
GM chickens that don't transmit bird flu developed
GM chickens that don’t transmit bird flu developed
Breakthrough could prevent future bird flu epidemics. Chickens genetically modified to prevent them spreading bird flu have been produced by researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.01.2011
Neuroscientists explain Proustian effect of small details attached to big memories
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Neuroscientists at MIT's Picower Institute of Learning and Memory have uncovered why relatively minor details of an episode are sometimes inexplicably linked to long-term memories. The work is slated to appear in the Jan. 13 issue of Neuron . ?Our finding explains, at least partially, why seemingly irrelevant information like the color of the shirt of an important person is remembered as vividly as more significant information such as the person's impressive remark when you recall an episode of meeting this person,?

Health - Life Sciences - 13.01.2011
Skin provides Australia’s first adult stem cells for rare genetic disease
Scientists have developed Australia's first adult induced pluripotent stem cell lines using skin biopsies from patients with the rare genetic disease Friedreich Ataxia (FA).

Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2011
Study offers hope for tackling bird flu
Bird flu epidemics could be prevented by a new strain of chickens that do not spread avian flu to other birds.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2011
MicroRNAs could increase the risk of amputation in diabetics
MicroRNAs could increase the risk of amputation in diabetics
Press release issued 12 January 2011 New research has found one of the smallest entities in the human genome, micro-RNA, could increase the risk of limb amputation in diabetic patients who have poor blood flow. The study by Dr Andrea Caporali and colleagues in Professor Costanza Emanueli's research group in the Regenerative Medicine Section of the School of Clinical Sciences at the University of Bristol was funded by the Medical Research Council and is published online in Circulation : Journal of the American Heart Association .

Life Sciences - Physics - 12.01.2011
Caltech-Led Team Creates Damage-Tolerant Metallic Glass
Caltech-Led Team Creates Damage-Tolerant Metallic Glass
Amorphous palladium-based alloy demonstrates unprecedented level of combined toughness and strength; could be of use in biomedical implants PASADENA, Calif.—Glass is inherently strong, but when it cracks or otherwise fails, it proves brittle, shattering almost immediately. Steel and other metal alloys tend to be tough—they resist shattering—but are also relatively weak; they permanently deform and fail easily.

Pedagogy - Life Sciences - 12.01.2011
Cuckoos evolve to fool angry birds
Cuckoos evolve to fool angry birds
Australian cuckoo birds have taken a new evolutionary step - mimicking the colour of their host young to avoid certain death, according to a study by researchers from The Australian National University.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.01.2011
Researcher uses living cells to create 'biotic' video games
Researcher uses living cells to create ’biotic’ video games
The digital revolution has triggered a wild proliferation of video games, but what of the revolution in biotechnology?

Economics / Business - Life Sciences - 11.01.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2011
The good, the bad and the 'green' harnessing the potential of bacteria
The good, the bad and the ’green’ harnessing the potential of bacteria
PA 10/11 A diverse family of bacteria that can cause a potentially fatal illness in humans but could offer a greener alternative to petrol to power our cars will be the subject of a talk by a University of Nottingham academic at an international conference.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2011
Malaria parasites get jetlag too
Science Cath Harris | 11 Jan 11 The malaria parasite emerges and develops in synch with the bodyclock of its human host. A study by scientists at Oxford and Edinburgh universities, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B and covered by BBC News online and The Scientist , has shown that the parasite suffers significant penalties if it doesn't match its own bodyclock to the day-night pattern of its host.

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.01.2011
Wildlife biologists put dogs' scat-sniffing talents to good use
BERKELEY — It will come as no surprise to dog owners that their four-legged friends have a flair for sniffing out the excrement of other animals. Now, biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, have trained dogs to detect the scat of other critters for the greater good – to conduct more accurate surveys of wildlife.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.01.2011
Technique allows researchers to identify key maize genes for increased yield
Technique allows researchers to identify key maize genes for increased yield
A study published online on Jan. 9 has identified the genes related to leaf angle in corn (maize) - a key trait for planting crops closer together, which has led to an eight-fold increase in yield since the early 1900s. The study, led by researchers from Cornell and the U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) at Cornell and North Carolina State University, is the first to relate genetic variation across the entire maize genome to traits in a genomewide association study.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.01.2011

Life Sciences - 10.01.2011
Being poor can suppress children's genetic potentials
Jan. 10, 2011 AUSTIN, Texas — Growing up poor can suppress a child's genetic potential to excel cognitively even before the age of 2, according to research from psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. Half of the gains that wealthier children show on tests of mental ability between 10 months and 2 years of age can be attributed to their genes, the study finds.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.01.2011
Fruit fly droppings give insight into human gut problems
Fruit fly droppings give insight into human gut problems
Clues about how the human gut helps regulate our appetite have come from a most unusual source - fruit fly faeces. Scientists at the University of Cambridge are using the fruit fly to help understand aspects of human metabolism, including why pregnant women suffer from bloating and constipation, and even the link between a low calorie diet and longevity.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2011
Scientists say ’convergence’ offers potential for revolutionary advances in biomedicine, other fields
A new model for scientific research known as "convergence" offers the potential for revolutionary advances in biomedicine and other areas of science, according to a white paper issued today by 12 leading MIT researchers.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.01.2011
On the trail of a stealthy parasite
About one-third of the human population is infected with a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii, but most of them don?t know it. Though Toxoplasma causes no symptoms in most people, it can be harmful to individuals with suppressed immune systems, and to fetuses whose mothers become infected during pregnancy.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 03.01.2011
The surprising usefulness of sloppy arithmetic
A computer chip that performs imprecise calculations could process some types of data thousands of times more efficiently than existing chips.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2011
Infant hydrocephalus, seasonal and linked to farm animals in Uganda
Infant hydrocephalus, seasonal and linked to farm animals in Uganda
University Park, Pa. Hydrocephalus in Ugandan children and other developing countries is seasonal, linked to farm animals and in part, caused by previous bacterial infection, according to an international team of researchers from Uganda and the United States, who believe that the best approach to this problem is prevention.

Life Sciences - Law - 02.01.2011
Team overcomes major obstacle to cellulosic biofuel production
Team overcomes major obstacle to cellulosic biofuel production
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. A newly engineered yeast strain can simultaneously consume two types of sugar from plants to produce ethanol, researchers report.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.12.2010
Research center will address mobility disorders with 3-D simulations of a patient's movements
Research center will address mobility disorders with 3-D simulations of a patient’s movements
Bioengineering Professor Scott Delp is the director of a new national center for rehabilitation research at Stanford. The center will focus on using powerful software that simulates human movement to investigate movement disorders and identify the best treatments for patients. "People think about cancer and cardiovascular disease as the major problems associated with aging, but mobility is also very important.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.12.2010
Uncovering the neurobiological basis of general anesthesia
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. The use of general anesthesia is a routine part of surgical operations at hospitals and medical facilities around the world, but the precise biological mechanisms that underlie anesthetic drugs' effects on the brain and the body are only beginning to be understood. A review article in the Dec.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.12.2010
'Food of the gods' genome sequence could make finest chocolate better
'Food of the gods' genome sequence could make finest chocolate better
University Park, Pa. The production of high quality chocolate, and the farmers who grow it, will benefit from the recent sequencing and assembly of the chocolate tree genome, according to an international team led by Claire Lanaud of CIRAD, France, with Mark Guiltinan of Penn State, and including scientists from 18 other institutions.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2010
Novartis submits Bexsero , a multi-component meningococcal B vaccine, for regulatory review in Europe
Novartis submits Bexsero , a multi-component meningococcal B vaccine, for regulatory review in Europe Bexsero is the first vaccine with the potential to offer broad coverage against a large number of

Pedagogy - Life Sciences - 23.12.2010
When seeing is believing
When seeing is believing
Gaining an insight into the implications of vision loss may now be as simple as donning a pair of ‘vision goggles', thanks to a creative new teaching aid.

Life Sciences - 22.12.2010
How past experiences inform future choices
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Researchers at MIT‘s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory report for the first time how animals' knowledge obtained through past experiences can subconsciously influence their behavior in new situations. The work, which sheds light on how our past experiences inform our future choices, will be reported on Dec.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2010

Life Sciences - 20.12.2010

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2010
Clear speaking on lithium therapy
Clear speaking on lithium therapy
Around 50,000 people in the UK are currently taking lithium. When used appropriately, lithium can be a good way to prevent mood swings caused by bipolar disorder, combating mania, or treating severe and recurring bouts of depression.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.12.2010
Scientists decipher 3 billion-year-old genomic fossils
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. MIT scientists have created a sort of genomic fossil that shows that the collective genome of all life underwent an enormous expansion about 3 billion years ago, which they're calling the Archean Expansion.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 19.12.2010
Engineers take plasmon lasers out of deep freeze
BERKELEY — Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a new technique that allows plasmon lasers to operate at room temperature, overcoming a major barrier to practical utilization of the technology.

Life Sciences - 17.12.2010
Scientific expedition completes first double Antarctic crossing in vehicles
Scientific expedition completes first double Antarctic crossing in vehicles
Scientific expedition completes first double Antarctic crossing in vehicles The Moon Regan Transantarctic Expedition completed the first there-and-back crossing of Antarctica in wheeled vehicles today.

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