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Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2011
First patient receives novel gene therapy for type of blindness
First patient receives novel gene therapy for type of blindness
The first patient to receive gene therapy for an incurable type of blindness was treated at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford this week as part of a trial led by Oxford University.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2011
Researchers announce pioneering cancer drug project
Researchers announce pioneering cancer drug project
University of Sussex researchers announce pioneering cancer drug project University of Sussex researchers have found tumour-killing properties in an existing drug commonly used to suppress the immune system - a discovery that could lead to a new treatment for blood cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2011
UK scientists come together to help feed the 7 billion
UK scientists come together to help feed the 7 billion
The Universities of Exeter and Bristol, in partnership with Rothamsted Research have officially joined forces to tackle one of the biggest challenges facing humanity: how can we sustainably feed a growing population? The Food Security and Land Research Alliance launches at the House of Commons today amidst reports that the world population is on the brink of reaching seven billion.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2011
’Sensitivity gene’ predicts whether children benefit from CBT
Research has shown that a genetic marker, called Serotonin Transporter Promoter Polymorphism (5HTPP), can be used to predict whether a child suffering from anxiety disorder will benefit from cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). This is the first time that genetic analysis has been used to assess whether a psychological treatment like CBT will work for children.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.10.2011
You are what you eat: Low-fat diet with fish oil slows growth of prostate cancer cells
You are what you eat: Low-fat diet with fish oil slows growth of prostate cancer cells
Men who ate a low-fat diet with fish oil supplements for four to six weeks before having their prostate removed had slower cancer-cell growth in their prostate tissue than men who ate a traditional, high-fat Western diet, according to a study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 25.10.2011
Fall 2011 SEAS newsletter is now available
Fall 2011 SEAS newsletter is now available
Dive down into the genetic rabbit hole, learn about cool research, and discover other news around Oxford Street Dean's Note: Down the Genetic Rabbit Hole "While we cannot-and should not-stop technolo

Life Sciences - Health - 25.10.2011
New book by Stanford biologist looks toward future of pandemic prediction
New book by Stanford biologist looks toward future of pandemic prediction
Prevention rather than just treatment should define future interactions between humans and deadly viruses, argues Stanford visiting human biology Professor Nathan Wolfe in his new book, The Viral Storm .

Health - Life Sciences - 25.10.2011
Getting the Details: Images of Cancer
Getting the Details: Images of Cancer
Studies of specialised proteins by KTH researcher Helena Wållberg may have important implications for the future of cancer diagnostics. Her work is intended to allow doctors to one day distinguish tumours from healthy tissues and develop targeted treatments. A substantial complication in both detection and treatment of most cancers is that they hijack the body's own cells to form tumours, which makes the cancer both hard to see in medical images and difficult to attack without damaging other tissues.

Life Sciences - Administration - 25.10.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 25.10.2011
Technology, Energy and Healthcare Luminaries Paint Picture of Future
The Atlantic magazine joined forces last week with UC San Diego Extension and acclaimed innovators on the West Coast for an inaugural forum that drew CEOs, venture capitalists, philanthropists and journalists to premiere venues in La Jolla, including the University of California, San Diego.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.10.2011
President Obama Awards Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien National Medal of Science
What did UC San Diego Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien and President Barack Obama talk about as Chien received the National Medal of Science from the president Friday at the White House? About the importance of science education and research, of course.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.10.2011
Study of twins will explore links among genes, gut bacteria
Study of twins will explore links among genes, gut bacteria
A study of twins may lead to better understanding whether genes play a role in what kind of gut microbes a person has, and if this interplay influences such conditions as Crohn's disease, obesity and diabetes.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 24.10.2011
Illinois professor named Packard Fellow
Illinois professor named Packard Fellow
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. University of Illinois chemical and biomolecular engineering professor Charles Schroeder has been named a Packard Fellow in science and engineering.

Life Sciences - 23.10.2011
Breakthrough in the production of flood-tolerant crops
This week thousands of families lost their homes and crops as flood waters swept across Central America. In Thailand huge tracts of farmland were submerged as the country faced its worst flooding in 50 years. Across the globe agricultural production is at risk as catastrophic flooding becomes a world-wide problem.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.10.2011
UC San Diego Biologists Unravel How Plants Synthesize Their Growth Hormone
UC San Diego Biologists Unravel How Plants Synthesize Their Growth Hormone October 24, 2011 By Kim McDonald Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have succeeded in unraveling, for the first time, the complete chain of biochemical reactions that controls the synthesis of auxin, the hormone that regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2011
Salmonella researcher receives European honour
A leading microbiology expert from Imperial College London has been elected to the membership of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), it was announced this week.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2011
Obama nominates Princeton’s Bassler for National Science Board
President Barack Obama has nominated Princeton University molecular biologist Bonnie Bassler to serve as a member of the National Science Board, which oversees the National Science Foundation (NSF), the major source of federal funding for scientific research.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.10.2011
Of mice and women: Ithaca-Weill collaborations boost research and recruiting, say panelists
Of mice and women: Ithaca-Weill collaborations boost research and recruiting, say panelists
Of mice and women: Ithaca-Weill collaborations boost research and recruiting, say panelists Collaborations between researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Ithaca campus yield results that might otherwise be impossible, according to an Oct.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.10.2011
U of T well represented in Canadian Medical Hall of Fame
An insulin pioneer, a scientist who has elevated the prominence of medical research and a leading geneticist, all of whom worked at the University of Toronto , will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in March.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2011
Autistic brains develop more slowly than healthy brains, UCLA researchers say
Researchers at UCLA have found a possible explanation for why autistic children act and think differently than their peers. For the first time, they've shown that the connections between brain regions that are important for language and social skills grow much more slowly in boys with autism than in non-autistic children.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2011
Anatomical blueprint for motor antagonism identified
Walking or movement in general, comes so naturally to us, yet it results from a sophisticated interplay between the nervous system and muscles. Little is known about the neuronal blueprint that ensures the regulation of functionally opposing motor actions, which in turn are responsible for all movement.

Life Sciences - 19.10.2011
Baby-killer birds
Baby-killer birds
The mysterious behaviour of female Eclectus parrots killing their sons immediately after they hatch has been unravelled by a team of researchers from the Australian National University.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 19.10.2011

Life Sciences - Health - 19.10.2011
Bridging the Gap
Bridging the Gap
Caltech Neuroscientists Find Normal Brain Communication in People Who Lack Connections Between Right and Left Hemispheres Like a bridge that spans a river to connect two major metropolises, the corpus callosum is the main conduit for information flowing between the left and right hemispheres of our brains.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2011
How hemp got high
A team of Canadian researchers has sequenced the genome of Cannabis sativa, the plant that produces both industrial hemp and marijuana, and in the process revealed the genetic changes that led to the plant's drug-producing properties. Jon Page is a plant biochemist and adjunct professor of biology at the University of Saskatchewan.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2011
New U of M startup may save lives of victims of massive blood loss and trauma
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (10/18/2011) —A new technology from the University of Minnesota has resulted in a startup that may help prolong the lives of victims suffering from massive blood loss or trauma.

Life Sciences - 18.10.2011
Protecting the brain when energy runs low
Researchers from the Universities of Leeds, Edinburgh and Dundee have shed new light on the way that the brain protects itself from harm when 'running on empty'. The findings could lead to new treatments for patients who are at risk of stroke because their energy supply from blood vessels feeding the brain has become compromised.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2011
Worobo discovers compound in a honey that could lead to a new natural preservative
Worobo discovers compound in a honey that could lead to a new natural preservative
Honey has been used as a topical antibiotic since the Egyptians wrote papyrus prescriptions. Now, a Cornell food scientist has identified an antimicrobial compound in a honey that makes it a promising candidate as a natural preservative to prevent food-borne illness and food spoilage. Randy Worobo, associate professor of food microbiology at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and his lab members tested more than 2,000 strains of bacteria from eight types of honey from the United States and New Zealand.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
Vast Hidden Network Regulating Gene Expression in Cancer
VIDEO: Richard Mayeux discusses ongoing Alzheimer's Disease research. MEDIA INQUIRIES Main number: (212) 305-3900 cumcnews [a] columbia (p) edu Vast Hidden Network Regulates Gene Expression in Cancer Published: October 14, 2011 New York, NY (October 14, 2011) - Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and two other institutions have uncovered a vast new gene regulatory network in mammalian cells that could explain genetic variability in cancer and other diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
Could hypertension drugs help people with Alzheimer’s?
Within the next 20 years it is expected the number of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) will double from its current figure of half a million to one million. A new study has looked at whether certain types of drugs used to treat high blood pressure, also called hypertension, might have beneficial effects in reducing the number of new cases of Alzheimer's disease each year.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2011
King’s at the London Science Festival
King's is hosting a range of events this month as part of the first ever London Science Festival. From 21-25 October, the College will host debates, demonstrations and presentations on a diverse range of topics, ranging from how to treat a heart attack to the world of nanomaterials.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
Making a healthier Australia: Sydney expertise leads national funding round
17 October 2011 The groundbreaking work of University of Sydney health and medical researchers has been recognised by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in a major announcement of government funding.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2011
A New Age in Brain Research Starts Today
17 Oct 2011 Melbourne will become a magnet for the world's best and brightest brain researchers with the official opening of the Melbourne Brain Centre at the University of Melbourne Parkville by the

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
ANU congratulates medical grant recipients
ANU congratulates medical grant recipients
ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Young has congratulated all recipients of National Health and Medical Research grants, particularly the 18 winners from The Australian National University.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2011
Genetically Influenced Responses to Alcohol Affect Brain Activation
Genetically Influenced Responses to Alcohol Affect Brain Activation October 15, 2011 Debra Kain A study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests that differences in brain activation in individuals with a low level of response to alcohol may contribute to their inability to recognize modest levels of alcohol intoxication.

Life Sciences - Economics / Business - 14.10.2011
Farming for the future
‘Back to nature’ could be Leif Bülow’s slogan. He is attempting to create new technology which takes us back to the time when the forests supplied us with natural resources which oil then replaced.

Life Sciences - Event - 14.10.2011
LU researchers write their own cookbook
Green tea ice cream with bilberry sauce! This dessert has a positive effect on brain function and the recipe is exclusive to the Lund University cookbook.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 14.10.2011
Brain art
Brain art
A new exhibition showcasing the University's world-leading brain imaging research will be on display as part of a Cardiff festival.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2011
Study explores whether a bigger brain makes for a smarter child in babies born prematurely
Friday 14 October Adapted from a news release issued by the American Academy of Neurology New research published this week suggests the growth rate of the brain's cerebral cortex in babies born prematurely may predict how well they are able to think, speak, plan and pay attention later childhood. The cerebral cortex is the outer layer of the brain covering the cerebrum, and is responsible for cognitive functions, such as language, memory, attention and thought.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2011
South Asians and Europeans react differently to common drugs
14 October 2011 A University of Sydney PhD student has discovered the different diets and lifestyles of South Asians compared to Europeans could lead to the two groups requiring very different doses of medicines commonly used to treat illnesses such as depression and psychosis. Vidya Perera, a final year PhD student in the Faculty of Pharmacy , has found that people from South Asia could need lower doses of these medicines because they are likely to have lower levels of CYP1A2, an enzyme that metabolises drugs.

Event - Life Sciences - 14.10.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 13.10.2011
Skin cancer research awarded major European grant
13 Oct 2011 University of Manchester researchers looking into skin cancer have been awarded a prestigious European Research Council grant worth ¤1.5 million.

Life Sciences - Economics / Business - 13.10.2011

Life Sciences - 13.10.2011
Cichlid male nannies help out, especially if they've been sneaking
Cichlid male nannies help out, especially if they’ve been sneaking
Subordinate male cichlid fish who help with the childcare for the dominant breeding pair are occasionally actually the fathers of some of the offspring they help to rear, according to new research from the University of Bristol published today in PLoS ONE. This sneaky paternity increases the subordinate fish's investment in the offspring in their care.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.10.2011
Body talk ... taking the guesswork out of tissue engineering
McGill researcher works on developing effective biodegradable scaffolds for body implants Among the 24 Canada Research Chairs awarded to McGill University that were announced this morning at Concordia University, the work of one particular researcher offers hope for Canada's ageing population.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.10.2011
Oil Exploration Would Endanger the Most Biodiverse Region in the Western Hemisphere, Say Scientists
Oil Exploration Would Endanger the Most Biodiverse Region in the Western Hemisphere, Say Scientists
AUSTIN, Texas — An international team of scientists that includes two University of Texas at Austin researchers has found that Ecuador's Yasuní National Park , which sits on top of massive reserves of oil, is in the single most biodiverse region in the Western Hemisphere.