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Computer Science - Life Sciences - 24.08.2011
Mapping the brain
Mapping the brain
Computer scientist Hanspeter Pfister helps turn terabytes of image data into a navigable 3D model of neural circuits By Sarah Zhang '11 The brain of a mouse measures only 1 cubic centimeter in volume.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 23.08.2011
Storing vertebrates in the cloud
Storing vertebrates in the cloud
A trumpet fish and tiger shark, two vertebrate species represented in the world's museum collections.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.08.2011
500 years ago, yeast's epic journey gave rise to lager beer
500 years ago, yeast’s epic journey gave rise to lager beer
In the 15th century, when Europeans first began moving people and goods across the Atlantic, a microscopic stowaway somehow made its way to the caves and monasteries of Bavaria. The stowaway, a yeast that may have been transported from a distant shore on a piece of wood or in the stomach of a fruit fly, was destined for great things.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 22.08.2011
Simply eating a lighter lunch can prompt weight loss
Losing weight without dieting, going hungry or using an expensive high-protein liquid diet can be as simple as eating a smaller lunch, reports a new Cornell study that is online and will be published in the journal Appetite in October.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.08.2011
Iberian Lynx not doomed by its genetics
Iberian Lynx not doomed by its genetics
The low genetic diversity of the Iberian lynx ' the most endangered carnivore in Europe - may not decrease the species' chance of survival, according to new research by geneticists. Research looking at DNA from Iberian lynx fossils shows that they have had very little genetic variation over the last 50,000 years, suggesting that a small long-term population size is the 'norm' in the species and has not hampered their survival.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 22.08.2011
In the early life of an embryo, a monster lurks
In the early life of an embryo, a monster lurks
by Morgan Kelly Research based at Princeton University has revealed that newly fertilized cells only narrowly avoid degenerating into fatal chaos. At the same time, scientists have discovered that embryos have acquired a mechanism to contain this dangerous instability, a finding that could help biologists unravel other mysteries about the first hours of life.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.08.2011
Ancient whale skulls and directional hearing: A twisted tale
Aug. 22, 2011 Ancient whale skulls and directional hearing: A twisted tale ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Skewed skulls may have helped early whales discriminate the direction of sounds in water and are not solely, as previously thought, a later adaptation related to echolocation.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.08.2011
UW joins national push to sequence human genome on the cheap
UW joins national push to sequence human genome on the cheap
The National Human Genome Research Institute today announced that the University of Washington is one of eight institutions funded to revolutionize DNA sequencing. Two of the eight institutions are in Seattle. The goal of the federal effort is more rapid sequencing of a person's genome at a lower price: $1,000 or less.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.08.2011
Sweet insight: Discovery could speed drug development
The surface of cells and many biologically active molecules are studded with sugar structures that are not used to store energy, but rather are involved in communication, immunity and inflammation. In a similar manner, sugars attached to drugs can enhance, change or neutralize their effects, says Jon Thorson , a professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2011
Cells derived from pluripotent stem cells may pose challenges for clinical use, research
Cells derived from pluripotent stem cells may pose challenges for clinical use, research
UCLA researchers have found that three types of cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells and from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are similar to each other, but they are far more developmentally immature than those same cell types taken directly from human tissue. In fact, the progeny of these hES and iPS cells are much more similar to cells found within the first two months of fetal development than anything later, according to the scientists from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2011
Huge funding boost for biomedical research at Imperial
Huge funding boost for biomedical research at Imperial
By Laura Gallagher Friday 19 August 2011 Two NHS Trusts in partnership with Imperial College London have received multi-million pound awards to boost research and enable the development of more effective medicines, treatments and care for patients, it was announced this week.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2011
Micro-organisms are "invisible" to the immune system
That micro-organisms have a great capacity to vary their surface structure is well known. It is one of the reasons why it is so difficult to develop vaccines against HIV and malaria, and why new influenza vaccines have to be produced every year. But it seems that these micro-organisms are also able to completely avoid activating a strong immune response in the person attacked.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.08.2011
Major funding announced for hearing and digestive diseases research
Two University of Nottingham and NHS research partnerships in Nottingham have been awarded a combined 13.5 million in funding to help them to develop and translate new scientific discoveries into ground-breaking medicines, treatments and better care for all NHS patients.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.08.2011
Berkeley Lab Opens Advanced Biofuels Facility
Berkeley Lab Opens Advanced Biofuels Facility
BERKELEY, CA - The ailing United States' economy would receive a much needed boost with the commercial development of a domestic source of transportation fuel - especially if that fuel were to be cle

Health - Life Sciences - 18.08.2011
Government invests in Biomedical Research
The Department of Health announced today (18 August) that it will pledge over 110m of funding over the next five years to two National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs), and a new Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia at King's College London.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 18.08.2011
Chemistry professor Omar Yaghi, in his own words
Omar Yaghi is one of the world's great chemists. He was recently ranked No. 2 among the world's top 100 chemists of the past decade, based on the impact of his published research.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 18.08.2011
Getting inside the mind (and up the nose) of our ancient ancestors
Getting inside the mind (and up the nose) of our ancient ancestors
Reorganisation of the brain and sense organs could be the key to the evolutionary success of vertebrates, one of the great puzzles in evolutionary biology, according to a paper by an international team of researchers, published today in Nature.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 17.08.2011
'Endless Forms' uses the Web to breed 3-D printable objects
’Endless Forms’ uses the Web to breed 3-D printable objects
Just like generations of plants and animals evolve in nature, Cornell engineers are allowing anyone online to guide the evolution of printable, three-dimensional objects, aiming to revolutionize the design of art, architecture and even artificial intelligence.

Life Sciences - 17.08.2011
Wrens eavesdrop on the neighbours
Wrens eavesdrop on the neighbours
Superb fairy-wrens eavesdrop, learn to understand and react to the danger calls of other bird species that live nearby, according to new research published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Associate Professor Robert Magrath and Thomas Bennett from the Research School of Biology at The Australian National University made the discovery by playing recordings of miner-bird danger calls to fairy-wrens and observed the wrens fleeing to safety.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.08.2011
Stress in early life reduces life expectancy - and that of partners
A new study from the University of Glasgow, published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, suggests that our expectancy is likely to be strongly affected by how much stress we were exposed to early in our lives. And worse still, the study also shows that early life stress experienced by our mates could also be affecting how long we are likely to live.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.08.2011
Parasite uses the power of sexual attraction to trick rats into becoming cat food
Parasite uses the power of sexual attraction to trick rats into becoming cat food
Could it be love? Rats infected with the parasite Toxoplasma seem to lose their fear of cats – or at least cat urine. Now Stanford researchers have discovered that the brains of those infected, fearless male rats show activity in the region that normally triggers a mating response when they meet a female rat.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.08.2011
HIV Havens: Caltech Researchers Find New Clues About How HIV Reservoirs May Form
HIV Havens: Caltech Researchers Find New Clues About How HIV Reservoirs May Form
Much like cities organize contingency plans and supplies for emergencies, chronic infectious diseases like HIV form reservoirs that ensure their survival in adverse conditions.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.08.2011
UM Researchers Contribute to Landmark MS Study
UM Researchers Contribute to Landmark MS Study
— Coral Gables — Scientists have identified 29 new genetic variants linked to multiple sclerosis, providing key insights into the biology of an important and very debilitating neurological disease. Many of the genes implicated in the study are relevant to the immune system, shedding light onto the immunological pathways that underlie the development of multiple sclerosis.

Linguistics / Literature - Life Sciences - 12.08.2011
New U Libraries exhibit highlights Minnesota roots of Green Revolution
Legacy funds support project to catalog and digitize rare agriculture records MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (08/12/2011) —If Norman Borlaug was the father of the Green Revolution, its grandfather was E.C. Stakman of the University of Minnesota's Plant Pathology Department.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.08.2011
Researcher helps highlight DNA testing dilemma
Researcher helps highlight DNA testing dilemma
Sussex researcher helps highlight DNA testing dilemma University of Sussex researcher Michael Hopkins has contributed to a report that highlights the growing conflict between the health service and private enterprise over genetic discoveries. Hopkins, who is a Senior Lecturer in SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research at the University of Sussex is an expert on the uses of gene patents, where genetic techniques and DNA sequences are licensed as the property of biotech firms and others looking to profit from their research in the fast-growing field of diagnostic genetics.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 11.08.2011
Expert available to media on flexible electronics
A new development in the field of flexible electronics could allow hospitals to monitor patient vital signs without bulky cables or uncomfortable electrodes.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.08.2011
Fanjul Family Donates $1 million to Bascom Palmer
Fanjul Family Donates $1 million to Bascom Palmer
— Coral Gables — The Fanjul family, owners of Florida Crystals Corporation , have pledged a $1 million gift to Bascom Palmer Eye Institute , part of the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 11.08.2011
Smart skin: Electronics that stick, stretch like a temporary tattoo
Smart skin: Electronics that stick, stretch like a temporary tattoo
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Engineers have developed a device platform that combines electronic components for sensing, medical diagnostics, and human-machine interfaces, all on an ultrathin skin-like patch that mounts directly onto the skin with the ease, flexibility and comfort of a temporary tattoo. Led by John A. Rogers, the Lee J. Flory-Founder professor of engineering at the University of Illinois, the researchers described their novel skin-mounted electronics in the Aug.

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.08.2011
Scientists must become advocates, or civilization is endangered, Stanford biologist says
Scientists must become advocates, or civilization is endangered, Stanford biologist says
Scientists, especially ecologists, have to be more active in explaining the meaning of their research results to the public if human behavior is going to change in time to prevent a planetary catastrophe, says biologist Paul Ehrlich.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.08.2011
Q&A with Steven Salzberg 89 (Ph.D.)
Q&A with Steven Salzberg 89 (Ph.D.)
Expert in bioinformatics has helped sequence the genomes of humans, anthrax, and woolly mammoths Steven Salzberg '89 developed an interest in genomics while working toward his Ph.D.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.08.2011
Newts and salamanders can regrow their damaged hearts, so why can't we?
Newts and salamanders can regrow their damaged hearts, so why can’t we?
Stem cell researchers at UCLA have uncovered for the first time why adult human cardiac myocytes — specialized muscle cells in the heart — have lost their ability to proliferate, perhaps explaining why the human heart has little regenerative capacity.

Physics - Life Sciences - 10.08.2011
ANU congratulates new ARC Laureates
ANU congratulates new ARC Laureates
Australian National University Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Young has congratulated all Australian Research Council 2011 Australian Laureate Fellows, especially the three researchers from ANU.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.08.2011
New drug could cure nearly any viral infection
Researchers at MIT's Lincoln Lab have developed technology that may someday cure the common cold, influenza and other ailments. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Most bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics such as penicillin, discovered decades ago. However, such drugs are useless against viral infections, including influenza, the common cold, and deadly hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.08.2011
Curry spice could offer treatment hope for tendinitis
Curry spice could offer treatment hope for tendinitis
PA 240/11 A derivative of a common culinary spice found in Indian curries could offer a new treatment hope for sufferers of the painful condition tendinitis, an international team of researchers has shown. In a paper due to be published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the researchers at The University of Nottingham and Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich have shown that curcumin, which also gives the spice turmeric its trademark bright yellow colouring, can be used to suppress biological mechanisms that spark inflammation in tendon diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.08.2011
Mosquitoes can't spot a spermless mate
Mosquitoes can’t spot a spermless mate
A female mosquito cannot tell if the male that she has mated with is fertile or 'spermless' and unable to fertilise her eggs, according to a new study from scientists at Imperial College London. The research, published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , could help scientists in their mission to prevent the spread of malaria by interfering with the mosquitoes' ability to reproduce.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 09.08.2011
In a First, Scientists Successfully Forecast Undersea Eruption
Crew members prepare the remotely operated vehicle Jason to dive to Axial Seamount. (Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University) Researchers returning from a cruise some 250 miles off the coast of Oregon have reported seeing a volcanic eruption on the seafloor that they accurately forecast five years ago—the first successful prediction of an undersea eruption.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.08.2011
Mutations Not Inherited From Parents Cause More Than Half the Cases of Schizophrenia
Many cases of schizophrenia occur in families with no history of the disease. Rare protein-altering genetic mutations contribute to these cases. Researchers expect to find perhaps hundreds more of such mutations—a necessary step toward understanding how the disease develops. Columbia University Medical Center researchers have shown that new, or "de novo," protein-altering mutations—genetic errors that are present in patients but not in their parents—play a role in more than 50 percent of "sporadic" —i.e., not hereditary—cases of schizophrenia.

Life Sciences - 08.08.2011
Paranoia about rivals alters insect mating behaviour
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that male fruitflies experience a type of 'paranoia' in the presence of another male, which doubles the length of time they mate with a female, despite the female of the species only ever mating with one male.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 08.08.2011
Four Illinois professors elected American Chemical Society fellows
Four Illinois professors elected American Chemical Society fellows
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Four University of Illinois chemistry professors are among 213 distinguished scientists elected fellows of the American Chemical Society this year.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 08.08.2011
Research on protocells sheds new light on the evolution of life
Research on protocells sheds new light on the evolution of life
Researchers at the University of Bristol have designed a chemical system which represents perhaps the simplest protocell model of cell formation on the early Earth.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.08.2011
Cause of Common Kidney Disease
Cause of Common Kidney Disease
— Miami — Nephrologists at the Miller School of Medicine have discovered the cause of a significant form of chronic kidney disease, ending a decades-long search. Working with mouse models and a bank of patient samples, the scientists have found the first circulating factor known to start the process leading to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS).

Health - Life Sciences - 05.08.2011
Study Explains What Makes Muscles Weaken With Age and Points to Possible Therapy
(NEW YORK, NY) - Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered the biological mechanism behind age-related loss of muscle strength and identified a drug that may help reverse this process. Their findings were published in the August 2 online edition of Cell Metabolism . As we grow older, our skeletal muscles tend to wither and weaken, a phenomenon known as sarcopenia.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.08.2011
UCL wins 10 European Research Council grants
Ten UCL researchers have received European Research Council (ERC) Starting Investigator grants with a total value of more than 12.4 million.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.08.2011
In the blood
In the blood
Bacterial infections might move more slowly than heart attacks, writes Frank Bowden, but they can be just as deadly.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 03.08.2011
UCLA life scientists' study of abalone yields new insights into sexual reproduction
UCLA life scientists’ study of abalone yields new insights into sexual reproduction
In new research that could have implications for improving fertilization in humans and other mammals, life scientists studied interactions between individual sperm and eggs in red abalone, an ocean-dwelling snail, and made precise chemical measurements and physical models of these interactions. They are the first scientists to do so.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 03.08.2011
25 McGill-based Vanier scholars to research outer space, diseases and disorders, and social issues
Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced today the names of the 2011 Vanier Canadian Graduate Scholarship recipients, including 25 McGill-based researchers from Canada and around the world.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.08.2011
Research helps breeders really know their onions to enhance global food security
Research led by the Warwick Crop Centre in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick has developed a unique collection of information about the disease resistance of 96 of the world's onion varieties.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.08.2011
Research helps breeders really know their onions to enhance global food security
Research led by the Warwick Crop Centre in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick has developed a unique collection of information about the disease resistance of 96 of the world's onion varieties.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2011
Improving early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease
PA 238/11 Researchers at The University of Nottingham have been awarded 670,000 to develop a new early warning system for Alzheimer's disease.