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Life Sciences - Health - 12.09.2011
Tinnitus discovery could lead to new ways to stop the ringing
Tinnitus discovery could lead to new ways to stop the ringing
Neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, are offering hope to the 10 percent of the population who suffer from tinnitus - a constant, often high-pitched ringing or buzzing in the ears that can be annoying and even maddening, and has no cure. Their new findings, published online last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , suggest several new approaches to treatment, including retraining the brain, and new avenues for developing drugs to suppress the ringing.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.09.2011
Project to tackle most common food poisoning bacteria
Project to tackle most common food poisoning bacteria
Twelve projects, bringing together researchers from across disciplines, will study Campylobacter in the food chain, from field to plate. Together, the projects cover a comprehensive range of questions about Campylobacter, which is the leading cause of food poisoning in the UK. The projects, funded through a joint call for proposals managed by BBSRC , the Food Standards Agency and Defra , will use a total of over £4 million funding to find out more about the organism that causes over 300,000 cases of food poisoning a year in England and Wales, and how best to control it.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.09.2011
Critical similarity between two types of do-it-all stem cells
Ever since human induced pluripotent stem cells were first derived in 2007, scientists have wondered whether they were functionally equivalent to embryonic stem cells, which are sourced in early stage embryos. Both cell types have the ability to differentiate into any cell in the body, but their origins — in embryonic and adult tissue — suggest that they are not identical.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.09.2011
Appalachian Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly A Hybrid Species Of Two Other Swallowtails, Scientists Find
Sept. 9, 2011 AUSTIN, Texas — Flitting among the cool slopes of the Appalachian Mountains is a tiger swallowtail butterfly species that evolved when two other species of swallowtails hybridized long ago, a rarity in the animal world, biologists from The University of Texas at Austin and Harvard University have found.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.09.2011
Tackling the most common food poisoning
The University of Nottingham is to play a major role in a cross disciplinary nationwide study to find out more about the organism that causes over 300,000 cases of food poisoning every year in England and Wales and how best to control it. Campylobacter is the leading cause of food poisoning in the UK.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 09.09.2011
Captivated by Critters: Humans Are Wired to Respond to Animals
Some people feel compelled to pet every furry animal they see on the street, while others jump at the mere sight of a shark or snake on the television screen. No matter what your response is to animals, it may be thanks to a specific part of your brain that is hardwired to rapidly detect creatures of the nonhuman kind.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.09.2011
Researchers probe genetic link to blindness
University of Leeds researchers have used next-generation DNA sequencing techniques to discover what causes a rare form of inherited eye disorders, including cataracts and glaucoma, in young children. The findings should make it easier to identify families with this condition who are at risk of conceiving children with severely impaired vision, so they can receive appropriate genetic counselling.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.09.2011
Why we need plant scientists
Why we need plant scientists
'Plant scientist' should take its rightful place beside 'doctor', 'lawyer' and 'vet' in the list of top professions to which our most capable young people aspire, according to a hard-hitting letter by an international group of botanists and crop scientists published today.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.09.2011
Genetics 'cloud' opportunities for researchers and clinicians
Genetics ‘cloud’ opportunities for researchers and clinicians
Gene sequencing and analysis could be dramatically speeded up, leading to patients receiving a quicker and more accurate diagnosis, thanks to research led by Eagle Genomics Ltd. Using cloud computing technology, the researchers have found they can slash the amount of time it takes to store the huge amounts of information produced when individual genes are sequenced and analysed.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.09.2011
Loss of key estrogen regulator may lead to metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis
UCLA researchers have demonstrated that the loss of a key protein that regulates estrogen and immune activity in the body could lead to aspects of metabolic syndrome, a combination of conditions that can cause type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and cancer. The protein, known as estrogen receptor alpha, is critical in regulating immune system activity, including helping cells suppress inflammation and gobble up debris.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.09.2011
Researcher turns to Roman art for marine conservation
Researcher turns to Roman art for marine conservation
According to Hopkins Marine Station's Fiorenza Micheli, ancient mosaics of groupers can tell us that the endangered fish used to be bigger. The dusky grouper has been a popular target for Mediterranean fishermen since prehistoric times – their bones have been found in human settlements dating back more than 100,000 years.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.09.2011
Success of amphibian social networking spawns Reptile BioBlitz
Success of amphibian social networking spawns Reptile BioBlitz
An army sergeant in Iraq posted to Facebook a photo of a Lemon-yellow Tree Frog he encountered in a latrine, while a student participating in a scientific expedition in Costa Rica snagged a photo of a toad biologists had thought extinct.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.09.2011
Major advance in sleeping sickness drug made by Glasgow scientists
Scientists have made a key advance in developing a safer cure for sleeping sickness. Sleeping sickness - or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) - is a neglected tropical disease of major importance.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.09.2011
Protecting the world’s five Mediterranean ecosystems
California's Mediterranean coastline. Photo courtesy of the National Park Service. When researchers from around the globe converge at UCLA on Sept.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 06.09.2011
Last but not least: 'Building 4' to complete the SEQ2
Last but not least: ’Building 4’ to complete the SEQ2
The Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering Building, the fourth and last component of the Science and Engineering Quad, will echo the design and energy-saving features of the Jerry Yang and Akiko Yam

Health - Life Sciences - 06.09.2011
Gene defect that predisposes people to leukemia discovered
Gene defect that predisposes people to leukemia discovered
A new genetic defect that predisposes people to acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplasia has been discovered. The mutations were found in the GATA2 gene. Among its several regulatory roles, the gene acts as a master control during the transition of primitive blood-forming cells into white blood cells.

Life Sciences - Physics - 06.09.2011
Scientists develop artificial biominerals
Scientists develop artificial biominerals
University of Manchester scientists have successfully created synthetic crystals whose structures and properties mimic those of naturally occurring biominerals such as seashells. The findings, published , could be an important step in the development of high-performance materials, which could be manufactured under environmentally-friendly conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.09.2011
Harmless soil-dwelling bacteria successfully kill cancer
A bacterial strain of a harmless soil-dwelling bacteria that specifically targets tumours could soon be used as a vehicle to deliver drugs in frontline cancer therapy.

Administration - Life Sciences - 05.09.2011
The FMI receives another generous grant from the EU
The FMI receives another generous grant from the EU Marc Bühler, Group Leader at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI), has received one of the highly sought-after ERC Starting Grants from the European Research Council (ERC).

Life Sciences - Health - 02.09.2011
What songbirds have to say about human speech
The Canadian Foundation for Innovation has announced the winners of the most recent awards given out under the Leaders of Opportunity Fund. The 19 projects that received funding have brought a total of $ 3 890 640 in new research money to McGill. The research ranges from work on breast cancer and neurodegenerative diseases to new methods of using GIS and remote sensing technology to predict the effect of urban heat islands on water resources.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.09.2011
Team Says Sporulation May Have Given Rise to the Bacterial Outer Membrane
Team Says Sporulation May Have Given Rise to the Bacterial Outer Membrane
Bacteria can generally be divided into two classes: those with just one membrane and those with two. Now researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have used a powerful imaging technique to find what they believe may be the missing link between the two classes, as well as a plausible explanation for how the outer membrane may have arisen.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.09.2011
Gene sleuths trace tree-killing pathogen back to California
Gene sleuths trace tree-killing pathogen back to California
A row of Italian cypress trees near Siena, a city in Italy's Tuscany region, show symptoms of cypress canker disease. Researchers have traced the origin of the pathogen responsible for the disease back to California. (Photo by Robert Danti, Italian National Research Council) Genetic detective work by an international group of researchers may have solved a decades-long mystery of the source of a devastating tree-killing fungus that has hit six of the world's seven continents.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.08.2011
Cancer research at Lund University
One in three Swedes suffer from cancer at some point in their lives. That is 50 000 patients a year – or one every 10 minutes. In the next 20 years, more and more Swedes will get cancer. Cancer is one of the most prevalent diseases in our society. Thanks to medical research closely linked to clinical development, an increasing number of cancer patients can today be cured.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.08.2011
Major grant for better treatment of breast cancer
A quarter of the 7 000 women who are diagnosed with breast cancer each year are at risk of metastasis, i.e. the cancer returning. Over the past few years, researchers at Lund University have developed a technique that can identify in advance which patients are in this risk group. In the next two years, the method will begin to be tested by the health service in the cities of Lund and Malmö.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.08.2011
CREATE Health – a unique centre at Lund University
Despite major progress within cancer research, mortality from many types of cancer is still very high.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 31.08.2011
Word association: Princeton study matches brain scans with complex thought
Word association: Princeton study matches brain scans with complex thought
by Morgan Kelly In an effort to understand what happens in the brain when a person reads or considers such abstract ideas as love or justice, Princeton researchers have for the first time matched images of brain activity with categories of words related to the concepts a person is thinking about. The results could lead to a better understanding of how people consider meaning and context when reading or thinking.

Environment - Life Sciences - 31.08.2011
Coral could be used to create sunscreens
Researchers at King's College London have discovered how coral produces natural sunscreen compounds to protect itself from damaging UV rays, leading scientists to believe these compounds could form the basis of a new type of sunscreen for humans.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.08.2011
Winning wildlife photography
Winning wildlife photography
Cardiff ecologist Adam Seward has snapped up another prize in this year's British Ecological Society photographic competition.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.08.2011
Research will speed the tracing of salmonella outbreaks
Research will speed the tracing of salmonella outbreaks
During such mass food-poisoning outbreaks as the recent contamination of ground turkey, speedy identification of the bacteria involved can save lives and reduce illness. New research co-authored by a Cornell food scientist will accelerate the process of identifying strains of salmonella bacteria behind food poisonings - and reduce the time it takes to track the culprit from farm to fork.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.08.2011
UCLA memory fitness program improves memory abilities of oldest adults
UCLA memory fitness program improves memory abilities of oldest adults
Who hasn't forgotten someone's name, misplaced their glasses or walked into a room and not remembered why they entered? Normal age-related memory decline affects more than half of all seniors, and those over 80 are the most vulnerable. A new UCLA study has found that a memory fitness program offered to older adults in their senior living communities helped improve their ability to recognize and recall words, benefitting their verbal learning and retention.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 29.08.2011
The Brittleness of Aging Bones - More than a Loss of Bone Mass
The Brittleness of Aging Bones - More than a Loss of Bone Mass
It is a well-established fact that as we grow older our bones become more brittle and prone to fracturing. It is also well established that loss of mass is a major reason for older bones fracturing more readily than younger bones, hence medical treatments have focused on slowing down this loss.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.08.2011
Children with congenital heart disease at risk from harmful toxins
Babies and toddlers with congenital heart disease are at an increased risk of having harmful toxins in their blood, particularly following surgery, according to research by a team at Imperial College London. The study, published today in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine , found that children with high levels of toxins from gut bacteria in their blood are likely to take longer to recover from surgery and spend more time in intensive care.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.08.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 26.08.2011
New study will explore impact of exercise on pulmonary hypertension
For sufferers of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), maintaining healthy heart function isn't as simple as going for a jog every morning. Patients need to do all they can to slow damage to their heart, and exercise can improve potentially improve their quality of life. On the other hand, the demands of pumping blood into stiff, large arteries and narrowed small arteries means that many PAH patients bear an increased risk of overexertion, which makes prescribing the correct amount of physical activity difficult.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.08.2011
New funding for brain stimulation
New funding for brain stimulation
One of the biggest financing rounds for furthering the work of a young researcher has just been completed at EPFL.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.08.2011
New sensors streamline detection of estrogenic compounds
New sensors streamline detection of estrogenic compounds
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers have engineered new sensors that fluoresce in the presence of compounds that interact with estrogen receptors in human cells. The sensors detect natural or human-made substances that alter estrogenic signaling in the body. The study appears in the journal Biotechnology and Bioengineering.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 24.08.2011
Mapping the brain
Mapping the brain
Computer scientist Hanspeter Pfister helps turn terabytes of image data into a navigable 3D model of neural circuits By Sarah Zhang '11 The brain of a mouse measures only 1 cubic centimeter in volume.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 23.08.2011
Storing vertebrates in the cloud
Storing vertebrates in the cloud
A trumpet fish and tiger shark, two vertebrate species represented in the world's museum collections.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.08.2011
500 years ago, yeast's epic journey gave rise to lager beer
500 years ago, yeast’s epic journey gave rise to lager beer
In the 15th century, when Europeans first began moving people and goods across the Atlantic, a microscopic stowaway somehow made its way to the caves and monasteries of Bavaria. The stowaway, a yeast that may have been transported from a distant shore on a piece of wood or in the stomach of a fruit fly, was destined for great things.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 22.08.2011
Simply eating a lighter lunch can prompt weight loss
Losing weight without dieting, going hungry or using an expensive high-protein liquid diet can be as simple as eating a smaller lunch, reports a new Cornell study that is online and will be published in the journal Appetite in October.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.08.2011
Iberian Lynx not doomed by its genetics
Iberian Lynx not doomed by its genetics
The low genetic diversity of the Iberian lynx ' the most endangered carnivore in Europe - may not decrease the species' chance of survival, according to new research by geneticists. Research looking at DNA from Iberian lynx fossils shows that they have had very little genetic variation over the last 50,000 years, suggesting that a small long-term population size is the 'norm' in the species and has not hampered their survival.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 22.08.2011
In the early life of an embryo, a monster lurks
In the early life of an embryo, a monster lurks
by Morgan Kelly Research based at Princeton University has revealed that newly fertilized cells only narrowly avoid degenerating into fatal chaos. At the same time, scientists have discovered that embryos have acquired a mechanism to contain this dangerous instability, a finding that could help biologists unravel other mysteries about the first hours of life.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.08.2011
Ancient whale skulls and directional hearing: A twisted tale
Aug. 22, 2011 Ancient whale skulls and directional hearing: A twisted tale ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Skewed skulls may have helped early whales discriminate the direction of sounds in water and are not solely, as previously thought, a later adaptation related to echolocation.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.08.2011
UW joins national push to sequence human genome on the cheap
UW joins national push to sequence human genome on the cheap
The National Human Genome Research Institute today announced that the University of Washington is one of eight institutions funded to revolutionize DNA sequencing. Two of the eight institutions are in Seattle. The goal of the federal effort is more rapid sequencing of a person's genome at a lower price: $1,000 or less.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.08.2011
Sweet insight: Discovery could speed drug development
The surface of cells and many biologically active molecules are studded with sugar structures that are not used to store energy, but rather are involved in communication, immunity and inflammation. In a similar manner, sugars attached to drugs can enhance, change or neutralize their effects, says Jon Thorson , a professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2011
Cells derived from pluripotent stem cells may pose challenges for clinical use, research
Cells derived from pluripotent stem cells may pose challenges for clinical use, research
UCLA researchers have found that three types of cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells and from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are similar to each other, but they are far more developmentally immature than those same cell types taken directly from human tissue. In fact, the progeny of these hES and iPS cells are much more similar to cells found within the first two months of fetal development than anything later, according to the scientists from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2011
Huge funding boost for biomedical research at Imperial
Huge funding boost for biomedical research at Imperial
By Laura Gallagher Friday 19 August 2011 Two NHS Trusts in partnership with Imperial College London have received multi-million pound awards to boost research and enable the development of more effective medicines, treatments and care for patients, it was announced this week.