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Life Sciences - Health - 15.07.2011
Insect 'incest' signals an end to males
Insect 'incest' signals an end to males
Evolution may lead to males disappearing as they are replaced by 'parasitic fathers' who infect their daughters at birth in order to mate with them. The finding comes from Oxford University scientists studying how hermaphrodite insects, such as the scale insect Icerya purchasi , in which the same individual produces both sperm and eggs and mates with itself, might have evolved.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.07.2011
Is meditation the push-up for the brain?
Two years ago, researchers at UCLA found that specific regions in the brains of long-term meditators were larger and had more gray matter than the brains of individuals in a control group. This suggested that meditation may indeed be good for all of us since, alas, our brains shrink naturally with age.

Life Sciences - 13.07.2011
Male African cichlid fish go from 'zero to 60' when mating calls, Stanford researchers find
Male African cichlid fish go from ’zero to 60’ when mating calls, Stanford researchers find
In African cichlid fish society, only the dominant male reproduces. But Stanford researchers have found that if the dominant male disappears, a subordinate cichlid can rise to the procreative occasion with stunning speed, having kept its reproductive apparatus idling in low gear for the occasion. Other species, including mammals with similar social structures from mice to rhinos, may use the same approach.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2011
TEQSTARS internship programme will find future research leaders
A School of Engineering spin-out company has launched a novel competition to identify and develop exceptional research leaders of the future.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2011
Flagship journal meets in Cardiff
Flagship journal meets in Cardiff
International authorities from all branches of physiological science gathered in Cardiff for the annual European Editorial Committee of the Physiological Reviews. The publication is the highest rated physiological journal in the world for impact factor, and the 23 rd highest of all scientific journals.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.07.2011
Improving cancer prediction, prevention and treatment
A new Welsh partnership aims to translate Cardiff's strength in cancer genetics into improved healthcare for patients.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2011
Flagship journal meets in Cardiff
Flagship journal meets in Cardiff
International authorities from all branches of physiological science gathered in Cardiff for the annual European Editorial Committee of the Physiological Reviews. The publication is the highest rated physiological journal in the world for impact factor, and the 23 rd highest of all scientific journals.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.07.2011
Improving cancer prediction, prevention and treatment
A new Welsh partnership aims to translate Cardiff's strength in cancer genetics into improved healthcare for patients.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2011
Eight new nominations
Eight new nominations
On Friday, July 8, 2011, the ETH board announced the nominations and internal promotions of eight professors, including a professor who has been appointed to the Bertarelli Foundation chair in EPFL's Center for Neuroprosthetics.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.07.2011
’Evening’ Protein Complex That Regulates Plant Growth
Soybeans grow in spurts just before dawn. This time-lapse video shows a soybean seedling sprouting over several days. Video Credit: UC San Diego (movie at: http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/scicomm/video/bigbeansprout.mov ) Farmers and other astute observers of nature have long known that crops like corn and sorghum grow taller at night.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.07.2011
Switch from corn to grass would raise ethanol output, cut emissions
Switch from corn to grass would raise ethanol output, cut emissions
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Growing perennial grasses on the least productive farmland now used for corn ethanol production in the U.S. would result in higher overall corn yields, more ethanol output per acre and better groundwater quality, researchers report in a new study. The switch would also slash emissions of two potent greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 12.07.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 11.07.2011
3M boost for Wales' mental health
3M boost for Wales’ mental health
Wales? first centre designed to bring frontline mental health workers and the University's world-leading researchers together for the benefit of patients, has been announced.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.07.2011
3M boost for Wales' mental health
3M boost for Wales’ mental health
Wales? first centre designed to bring frontline mental health workers and the University's world-leading researchers together for the benefit of patients, has been announced.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.07.2011
UW-Madison scientists played role in potato genome project
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists are part of an international consortium that has successfully sequenced and analyzed the potato genome. The consortium's work, which is described in the current issue of Nature , turned up more than 39,000 genes and is expected to speed potato research and breeding projects around the globe.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2011
Study offers clues on memory puzzle
Scientists have shed light on why it is easier to learn about things related to what we know than to learn about unfamiliar things.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.07.2011
Ancestry of polar bears traced to Ireland
An international team of scientists has discovered that the female ancestor of all living polar bears was a brown bear that lived in the vicinity of present-day Britain and Ireland just prior to the peak of the last ice age, 20,000 to 50,000 years ago. Beth Shapiro, the Shaffer Associate Professor of Biology at Penn State and one of the team's leaders, explained that climate changes affecting the North Atlantic ice sheet probably gave rise to periodic overlaps in bear habitats.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2011
Targeting antibiotic resistant bacteria
A new technique which targets antibiotic-resistant bacteria and shields patients from the toxic parts of an antibiotic drug has been developed by University scientists.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2011
Targeting antibiotic resistant bacteria
A new technique which targets antibiotic-resistant bacteria and shields patients from the toxic parts of an antibiotic drug has been developed by University scientists.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 06.07.2011
New information revealed about a protein implicated in autism and similar disorders; could lead to better drug design
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—University of Michigan researcher Gabrielle Rudenko and her Life Sciences Institute lab have solved the structure of a protein that is implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and mental retardation. This information allows scientists to better understand the molecular workings of these disorders, which will someday lead to the design of more effective drugs.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.07.2011
Gray whales likely survived the Ice Ages by changing their diets
Gray whales likely survived the Ice Ages by changing their diets
Gray whales survived many cycles of global cooling and warming over the past few million years, likely by exploiting a more varied diet than they do today, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, and Smithsonian Institution paleontologists.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2011
Scientists sequence DNA of cancer-resistant rodent
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have generated the first whole-genome sequencing data of the naked mole-rat, a rodent that is resistant to cancer and lives for more than 30 years. The naked mole-rat is native to the deserts of East Africa and has unique physical traits that allow it to survive in harsh environments for many years.

Life Sciences - 06.07.2011
Scans capture spider's heart beat
Intricate scans of tarantulas reveal for the first time in detail how their hearts beat. The MRI scans, which show blood flowing in and out of a spider's heart, suggest the way in which a spider's heart functions is much more complex than previously thought. Insight from images University scientists used the scans to look at heart rate and blood volume, enabling a better insight into the workings of a spider's heart.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.07.2011
Being small has its advantages, if you are a leaf
The size of leaves can vary by a factor of 1,000 across plant species, but until now, the reason why has remained a mystery. A new study by an international team of scientists led by UCLA life scientists goes a long way toward solving it. In research federally funded by the National Science Foundation, the biologists found that smaller leaves are structurally and physiologically better adapted to dry soil because of their distinct vein systems.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.07.2011
Entomologist discovers that the common eastern bumblebee can boost pumpkin yields
Entomologist discovers that the common eastern bumblebee can boost pumpkin yields
Each grinning jack-o'-lantern starts with yellow pollen grains, ferried from a male to a female pumpkin flower by bees.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.07.2011
Old life capable of revealing new tricks after all
Old life capable of revealing new tricks after all
Archaea are among the oldest known life-forms, but they are not well understood. It was only in the 1970s that these single-celled microorganisms were designated as a domain of life distinct from bacteria and multicellular organisms called eukaryotes. Robert Gunsalus, a UCLA professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics, developed an interest in Archaea because of their ability to thrive in harsh environments.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.07.2011
Three U. of I. scientists join Scientific American's blog network
Three U. of I. scientists join Scientific American’s blog network
CHAMPAIGN, lll. When Scientific American unveils its new blog network Tuesday (July 5), the roster of hand-picked science communicators will include three University of Illinois bloggers.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2011
Experts to develop mobile phone malaria detector
The University of Glasgow has received a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to further help in the diagnosis of malaria.

Life Sciences - Economics / Business - 05.07.2011
Hot springs microbe yields record-breaking, heat-tolerant enzyme
Hot springs microbe yields record-breaking, heat-tolerant enzyme
Bioprospectors from the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine have found a microbe in a Nevada hot spring that happily eats plant material - cellulose - at temperatures near the boiling point of water. In fact, the microbe's cellulose-digesting enzyme, called a cellulase, is most active at a record 109 degrees Celsius (228 degrees Fahrenheit), significantly above the 100? (212?) boiling point of water.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2011
New prototype device to help doctors prescribe most appropriate medicine for individual patients performs well in pilot study
New prototype device to help doctors prescribe most appropriate medicine for individual patients performs well in pilot study
By Colin Smith A prototype handheld device that analyses DNA to predict how patients may respond to their prescription medication has performed well in a preliminary pilot study, researchers announce today. Scientists at the Imperial College London spinout company DNA Electronics (DNAE) have successfully tested a prototype device that they have developed to determine if patients are genetically predisposed to suffering adverse reactions to prescription drugs.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 30.06.2011

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.06.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2011
New home for world-leading Institute
Scientists at a new 60 million institute are to tackle challenges such as how to feed the world's growing population.

Life Sciences - Law - 29.06.2011

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.06.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011
Cornell receives $500,000 to tackle salmonella in tomatoes
Two experts from Cornell are teaming up to tackle salmonella contamination in produce, thanks to a $500,000 grant from the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2011
Scientists sequence endangered Tasmanian devil's genome
Scientists sequence endangered Tasmanian devil's genome
A revolutionary species-preservation approach based on whole-genome analyses of two Tasmanian devils - one that had died of a contagious cancer known as Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) and one heal

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.06.2011
New Crops for the Future Research Centre for food and non-food uses
New Crops for the Future Research Centre for food and non-food uses
PA 195/11 The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus is to co- host the first ever Crops for the Future Research Centre (CFFRC) in partnership with the Government of Malaysia.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2011
Imperial professor who founded European Research Council rewarded by top scientific Academy
Imperial professor who founded European Research Council rewarded by top scientific Academy
by Simon Levey 24 June 2011 An eminent scientist who played a key role in establishing the European Research Council has this month received a prestigious prize for his dedication to promoting science and scientific achievement.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.06.2011

Law - Life Sciences - 23.06.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 23.06.2011

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 23.06.2011

Economics / Business - Life Sciences - 22.06.2011

Health - Life Sciences - 22.06.2011
Scientists accurately predict age using just a saliva sample
Scientists accurately predict age using just a saliva sample
The findings, which appear June 22 in PLoS One, an online journal of the Public Library of Science, offer a myriad of potential applications.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.06.2011
Breaking the chain: 'Molecular cap' blocks processes that lead to Alzheimer's, HIV
Breaking the chain: ’Molecular cap’ blocks processes that lead to Alzheimer’s, HIV
A new advance by UCLA biochemists has brought scientists one step closer to developing treatments that could delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease and prevent the sexual transmission of HIV.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.06.2011
In motor learning, it's actions, not intentions, that count
In motor learning, it’s actions, not intentions, that count
Research from Harvard's Neuromotor Control Lab contradicts a common assumption about how the body learns to make accurate movements : Caroline Perry , 617-496-1351 ' Albert Einstein defined insanity as "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Practicing the same task repetitively, though, tends to be the default procedure when trying to learn a new motor skill.