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Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2009
New $16 million center to push, pinch and probe cancer cells & tissues
BERKELEY — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded the University of California, Berkeley, $15.7 million over five years to allow physical scientists and engineers to open a new front in the war on cancer.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.10.2009
Standards for a new genomic era
Standards for a new genomic era
A team of geneticists has recently proposed a set of standards designed to elucidate the quality of publicly available genetic sequencing information.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2009
First Venture Research Fellowship awarded to Dr Nick Lane
Press Release Media coverage The first UCL Venture Research Fellowship has been awarded to Nick Lane, UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2009
First Venture Research Fellowship awarded to Dr Nick Lane
Press Release Media coverage The first UCL Venture Research Fellowship has been awarded to Nick Lane, UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.10.2009
Amphetamine use in adolescence may impair adult working memory
University of Illinois psychology professor Joshua Gulley and his colleagues found that amphetamine use in adolescence can lead to long-term impairments in memory. Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, lll. Rats exposed to high doses of amphetamines at an age that corresponds to the later years of human adolescence display significant memory deficits as adults - long after the exposure ends, researchers report.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.10.2009
Ironing out the genetic cause of hemoglobin problems
Ironing out the genetic cause of hemoglobin problems
Ironing out the genetic cause of hemoglobin problems Gene associated with hemoglobin regulation identified in new research - %0A " Imperial College London News Release Under strict embargo for 18&per

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.10.2009
Student biologists take tropical trip to the rainforest
Student biologists take tropical trip to the rainforest
Student biologists take tropical trip to the rainforest Third-year students enjoy Imperial's first field trip to Uganda %0A " By Danielle Reeves Tuesday 13 October 2009 Having your packed lunch stole

Health - Life Sciences - 12.10.2009
UCL co-ordinates project to advance cardiovascular engineering
UCL is co-ordinating a project to help young researchers develop careers in cardiovascular engineering.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.10.2009
UCL co-ordinates project to advance cardiovascular engineering
UCL is co-ordinating a project to help young researchers develop careers in cardiovascular engineering.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.10.2009
Juggling enhances connections in the brain
The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council and published , appears to show improved connectivity in parts of the brain involved in making movements necessary to catch the balls. 'We tend to think of the brain as being static, or even beginning to degenerate, once we reach adulthood,' says Dr Heidi Johansen-Berg of the Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, who led the work.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 08.10.2009
’Why would you read Twilight?’: Sample questions give an insight into Oxford interviews
The University of Oxford has released some sample Oxford questions - direct from the tutors who conduct the's - to provoke thought and help explain the reasoning behind even the most odd-sounding questions.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.10.2009
Scientists Decipher the 3-D Structure of the Human Genome
Cambridge, Mass. October 8, 2009 - Scientists have deciphered the three-dimensional structure of the human genome, paving the way for new insights into genomic function and expanding our understanding of how cellular DNA folds at scales that dwarf the double helix. In a paper featured this week on the cover of the journal Science, they describe a new technology called Hi-C and apply it to answer the thorny question of how each of our cells stows some three billion base pairs of DNA while maintaining access to functionally crucial segments.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.10.2009
UCL and Yale unite to improve global health
UCL and Yale University have formed an alliance to improve global health through scientific research, clinical and educational collaboration.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.10.2009
UCL and Yale unite to improve global health
UCL and Yale University have formed an alliance to improve global health through scientific research, clinical and educational collaboration.

Life Sciences - 06.10.2009

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.10.2009
Plymouth showcases marine expertise to NERC
The University of Plymouth is to showcase its pioneering marine and environmental expertise to one of the world’s most influential research funding bodies.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.10.2009
Plymouth showcases marine expertise to NERC
The University of Plymouth is to showcase its pioneering marine and environmental expertise to one of the world’s most influential research funding bodies.

Economics / Business - Life Sciences - 05.10.2009

Life Sciences - Health - 05.10.2009
Cal grad and former Cal professor win Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
Cal grad and former Cal professor win Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
BERKELEY — The bulk of the work for which Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider and John Szostak won this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine took place at the University of California, B

Life Sciences - Health - 02.10.2009
Growing greener greens
Growing greener greens
PA 259/09 A pioneering project to make our green vegetables even better for us has been launched by scientists at The University of Nottingham. The research will underpin future technological developments in agriculture that could help fight a looming food security crisis. 'Greens' like cabbages and broccoli are a well-known part of a healthy diet but they don't contain as large an amount of key minerals as they might, according to the lead scientist on the project, Associate Professor of Plant Nutrition, Dr Martin Broadley.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.10.2009
Protecting humans and animals from diseases in wildlife
Protecting humans and animals from diseases in wildlife
PA 255/09 Avian influenza (H5N1), rabies, plague, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), and more recently swine flu (H1N1) are all examples of diseases that have made the leap from animals to humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.10.2009
On the trail of our ancestors
On the trail of our ancestors
BERKELEY — The groundbreaking discovery of the partial skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus , a hominid species dating back 4.4 million years, is the latest in a long line of contributions UC Berkeley researchers have made toward the elucidation of the human ancestral tree.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.10.2009
Ethiopian desert yields oldest hominid skeleton
Ethiopian desert yields oldest hominid skeleton
The digitally reconstructed cranium of Ardi, a female of the species Ardipithecus ramidus , is displayed along with the creature's hand bones and an artist's conception of what Ardi would have looked like. Gen Suwa of the University of Tokyo led the reconstruction of the cranium from micro-CT scans of the bones, while artist Jay Matternes put flesh and fur on the creature's bones.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.09.2009
Scientists discover clues to what makes human muscle age
Scientists discover clues to what makes human muscle age
BERKELEY — A study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, has identified critical biochemical pathways linked to the aging of human muscle. By manipulating these pathways, the researchers were able to turn back the clock on old human muscle, restoring its ability to repair and rebuild itself.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.09.2009
Children of working mothers have unhealthier lifestyles
Children whose mothers go out to work have poorer dietary habits than those whose mothers are not in paid employment, according to a new UCL study. The children furthermore are more sedentary, and are more likely to be driven to school than children whose mothers do not work outside the home, according to research published today by Professor Catherine Law (UCL Institute of Child Health) in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health .

Health - Life Sciences - 28.09.2009
Children of working mothers have unhealthier lifestyles
Children whose mothers go out to work have poorer dietary habits than those whose mothers are not in paid employment, according to a new UCL study. The children furthermore are more sedentary, and are more likely to be driven to school than children whose mothers do not work outside the home, according to research published today by Professor Catherine Law (UCL Institute of Child Health) in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health .

Health - Life Sciences - 24.09.2009
New research to explore statin side effects
New research to explore statin side effects
PA 251/09 They have been hailed as wonder drugs - lowering cholesterol and helping heart patients recover their health - but side effects of some statin therapies may be loss of muscle mass and premature fatigue, especially in older people, the largest patient group taking them. In older people there is a clear relationship between the maintenance of muscle mass and quality of life and longevity.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.09.2009
Record-breaking grants year for UCLA School of Nursing; funding tops $18M
The UCLA School of Nursing is well on its way to fulfilling one of they key goals Dean Courtney Lyder set when he took the reins a year ago: enhancing the school's research structure.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 22.09.2009

Health - Life Sciences - 22.09.2009
Rethinking Alzheimer’s disease and its treatment targets
The standard explanation for what causes Alzheimer's is known as the amyloid hypothesis, which posits that the disease results from of an accumulation of the peptide amyloid beta, the toxic protein f

Life Sciences - Event - 21.09.2009
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honours Imperial Professor
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honours Imperial Professor
The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honours Imperial Professor Top prize for College's world-leading crystallographer %0A " By Danielle Reeves Tuesday 22 September 2009 An Imperial Professor who le

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2009
Biodiversity loss is undermining global development
Goals set to alleviate extreme poverty will not be met unless we address the accelerating rate of biodiversity loss, warn UCL scientists in a paper published in the latest issue of Science .

Health - Life Sciences - 21.09.2009
Stem cell research awareness day
Links: UCL Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine UCL iPSC working group members 2009 Stem Cell Awareness Day UCL podcasts: Stem cell research - the science, the methods and the applications UCL will this week mark Stem Cell Awareness Day (23 September) in a tradition honoured within research universities across the world.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2009
Biodiversity loss is undermining global development
Goals set to alleviate extreme poverty will not be met unless we address the accelerating rate of biodiversity loss, warn UCL scientists in a paper published in the latest issue of Science .

Health - Life Sciences - 21.09.2009
Stem cell research awareness day
Links: UCL Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine UCL iPSC working group members 2009 Stem Cell Awareness Day UCL podcasts: Stem cell research - the science, the methods and the applications UCL will this week mark Stem Cell Awareness Day (23 September) in a tradition honoured within research universities across the world.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.09.2009
Fact-finding visit to Nottingham by US State Department official
Fact-finding visit to Nottingham by US State Department official
PA 245/09 A senior US diplomat is visiting The University of Nottingham to find out more about its ground-breaking research on bioenergy and sustainability.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.09.2009
Postmenopausal women benefit from endurance training as much as younger women
Postmenopausal women benefit from endurance training as much as younger women
Zinta Zarins with one of the 10 subjects who participated in a study of the cardiovascular effects of endurance training - 60 minutes daily on an exercise bicycle - on postmenopausal women. (Credit: George Brooks/UC Berkeley photo) BERKELEY — Marilyn Graham was 56 when she signed up for a grueling hour of cycling each morning for 12 weeks, occasionally decked out in a mask, a heart monitor and a bag of intravenous fluid and subjected to needle pricks to obtain blood samples.

Life Sciences - Veterinary - 16.09.2009
Genetic Sex Determination Let Ancient Species Adapt to Ocean Life
Cambridge, Mass. September 16, 2009 - A new analysis of extinct sea creatures suggests that the transition from egg-laying to live-born young opened up evolutionary pathways that allowed these ancient species to adapt to and thrive in open oceans. The evolutionary sleuthing is described this week in the journal Nature by scientists at Harvard University and the University of Reading who also report that the evolution of live-born young depended crucially on the advent of genes - rather than incubation temperature - as the primary determinant of offspring sex.

Life Sciences - 15.09.2009
Investing in Natural Sciences: Faculty publishes Research Outlook
Investing in Natural Sciences: Faculty publishes Research Outlook
Investing in Natural Sciences: Faculty publishes Research Outlook Faculty of Natural Sciences Research Outlook published September 2009.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.09.2009
Sending science down the phone: new technology will map research across the world
Sending science down the phone: new technology will map research across the world
Sending science down the phone: new technology will map research across the world New mobile phone software will also help 'citizen scientists', say researchers - %0A " Imperial College London News R

Health - Life Sciences - 14.09.2009
Master gene that switches on disease-fighting cells identified by scientists
Master gene that switches on disease-fighting cells identified by scientists
Master gene that switches on disease-fighting cells identified by scientists Imperial-led researchers discover gene that drives blood stem cells to become Natural Killer cells %0A " Imperial College

Health - Life Sciences - 14.09.2009
UCLA School of Dentistry to build new cancer research facility
The UCLA School of Dentistry consistently ranks among the country's top dental schools in National Institutes of Health funding.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.09.2009
Sierra Nevada birds move in response to warmer, wetter climate
Sierra Nevada birds move in response to warmer, wetter climate
Birds had different reactions to climate change (from left): The Western bluebird shifted its geographical range in response to both temperature and precipitation changes, while the Anna's hummingbird simply moved away from its climatic niche. The high-elevation Clark's nutcracker tracked temperature in its response, while the low-elevation Bullock's oriole tracked precipitation.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.09.2009
Scientists help to identify master gene
UCL scientists have helped to identify the master gene that causes blood stem cells to turn into disease-fighting 'Natural Killer? (NK) immune cells. The discovery could one day help scientists boost the body's production of these frontline tumour-killing cells, creating new ways to treat cancer. The researchers have 'knocked out? the gene in question, known as E4bp4, in a mouse model, creating the world's first animal model entirely lacking NK cells, but with all other blood cells and immune cells intact.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.09.2009
Scientists help to identify master gene
UCL scientists have helped to identify the master gene that causes blood stem cells to turn into disease-fighting 'Natural Killer? (NK) immune cells. The discovery could one day help scientists boost the body's production of these frontline tumour-killing cells, creating new ways to treat cancer. The researchers have 'knocked out? the gene in question, known as E4bp4, in a mouse model, creating the world's first animal model entirely lacking NK cells, but with all other blood cells and immune cells intact.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.09.2009
Muscle: 'hard to build, easy to lose' as you age
Muscle: ’hard to build, easy to lose’ as you age
PA 233/09 Have you ever noticed that people have thinner arms and legs as they get older? As we age it becomes harder to keep our muscles healthy. They get smaller, which decreases strength and increases the likelihood of falls and fractures. New research is showing how this happens — and what to do about it.