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Palaeontology



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Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 03.10.2019

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Fish story for the ages: High schooler unearths rare fossil
Each summer, the University of Chicago welcomes high school students from around the world for a unique course on paleontology, which culminates with two weeks of fieldwork spent hunting for fossils.

Palaeontology - Environment - 18.09.2019
Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
This modern porcelain crab is really a member of the squat lobster family that became adapted to the same intertidal environment as true crabs.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 21.08.2019

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2019
Women don beards to highlight gender bias in science
Leslea Hlusko, a paleoanthropologist, with primate skull casts in Berkeley's Human Evolution Research Center.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called 'Age of Dinosaurs,' researchers show
Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called ’Age of Dinosaurs,’ researchers show
Paleontologists are trying to dispel a myth about what life was like when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The false narrative has wormed its way into books, lectures and even scientific papers about this long-ago era. The myth's focus isn't on dinosaurs. Its main characters are ancient mammals and their relatives, which together are known as mammaliaforms.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 06.06.2019
Shakes up sloth family tree
One of the world's leading economists explains why our communities could hold the answer to many of society's problems. Sloths once roamed the Americas, ranging from tiny, cat-sized animals that lived in trees all the way up to massive ground sloths that may have weighed up to six tons. The only species we know and love today, however, are the two-toed and three-toed sloths-but paleontologists have been arguing how to classify them, and their ancestors, for decades.

Palaeontology - Environment - 12.04.2019

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 25.02.2019
Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of two species of ancient reptile
Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of two species of ancient reptile
Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2019
Glasgow will face off with a new dinosaur as Trix the T.rex comes to Town
Image courtesy of Naturalis Visitors to Glasgow will get an amazing opportunity to see one of the best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons when it visits Scotland on the last leg of its European tour.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 10.12.2018
Ancient whale named for UW paleontologist Elizabeth Nesbitt
Ancient whale named for UW paleontologist Elizabeth Nesbitt
A newly discovered species of whale - found preserved in ancient rock on the Oregon coast - has been named for a University of Washington paleontologist.

Palaeontology - Environment - 13.11.2018
Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions
Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian extinctions
During the late Cretaceous period, more than 65 million years ago, hundreds of different species of birds flitted around the dinosaurs and through the forests as abundantly as they flit about our woods and fields today.

Earth Sciences - Palaeontology - 25.10.2018
Q&A: Provost Mark Richards' welcome lecture asks: ‘What really killed the dinosaurs''
Q&A: Provost Mark Richards’ welcome lecture asks: ‘What really killed the dinosaurs’’
Administrative affairs Arts and entertainment Buildings and grounds For UW employees Health and medicine Honors and awards Official notices Politics and government UW and the community The University

Palaeontology - Earth Sciences - 26.07.2018
Classic fossil site re-explored in undergraduate project
Classic fossil site re-explored in undergraduate project
Aust Cliff near Bristol has been known as a rich fossil site since the 1820s. Since then, thousands of people have visited this spectacular location on the banks of the Severn, and collected fossils of ancient sharks and sea dragons.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 11.07.2018
Three Previously Unknown Ancient Primates Identified
Kirk's father and Austin-based artist Randy Kirk produced his own rendering of what the species might have looked like. Painting on marble by Randwolf. AUSTIN, Texas - Biological anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin have described three new species of fossil primates that were previously unknown to science.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 09.07.2018
Innovative online Birmingham courses produce first graduates
A new species of ancient reptile has been described by scientists at the University of Birmingham, filling a critical gap in the fossil record of dinosaur cousins and suggesting that some features thought to characterise dinosaurs evolved much earlier than previously thought. Described in a paper published today in Nature, the carnivorous reptile, Teleocrater rhadinus, was approximately 7-10 feet in length, had a long neck and tail, and walked on four crocodile-like legs.

Palaeontology - Physics - 15.08.2017
Unique imaging of a dinosaur's skull tells evolutionary tale
Unique imaging of a dinosaur’s skull tells evolutionary tale
Researchers have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast. Collaboration creates highest-resolution scan of a large tyrannosaur skull LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 15, 2017-Researchers using Los Alamos' unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 26.07.2017
Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction
Possible look of the newly discovered predatory fish species Birgeria americana with the fossil oft he skull shown at bottom right (Artwork: Nadine Bösch) The most catastrophic mass extinction on Earth took place about 252 million years ago - at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geological periods.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 09.08.2016
Origin of the turtle shell lies in digging
Origin of the turtle shell lies in digging
In today's turtles the shell has a key protective function. The animals can withdraw into it and protect themselves against predators. No other group of vertebrates has modified its physique to such an extent to develop an impenetrable protective structure. “For a long time, paleontologists and developmental biologists puzzled over the origin of the tortoise shell,” explains Torsten Scheyer, a paleontologist at the University of Zurich.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 21.08.2014
Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds
Media Releases Research Using Synchrotron Light New analyses of tiny fossil mammals from South Wales are shedding light on the function and diets of our earliest ancestors, a team led by researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Leicester report . The team used CT scanning with synchrotron X-rays at PSI's Swiss Light Source to reveal in unprecedented detail the internal anatomy of the mammals' tiny jaws.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 18.08.2011
Getting inside the mind (and up the nose) of our ancient ancestors
Getting inside the mind (and up the nose) of our ancient ancestors
Reorganisation of the brain and sense organs could be the key to the evolutionary success of vertebrates, one of the great puzzles in evolutionary biology, according to a paper by an international team of researchers, published today in Nature.

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