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Physics - Chemistry - 22.04.2010
IBM Research creates world’s smallest 3D map; brings low cost and ease of use to the fabrication of nanoscale objects
Made in IBM Labs: IBM Research creates world's smallest 3D map; brings low cost and ease of use to the fabrication of nanoscale objects Zurich, Switzerland, and San Jose, CA, 22 April 2010—IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists have created a 3D map of the earth so small that 1,000 of them could fit on one grain of salt.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.04.2010
Caltech-Led Team Designs Novel Negative-Index Metamaterial that Responds to Visible Light
Caltech-Led Team Designs Novel Negative-Index Metamaterial that Responds to Visible Light
PASADENA, Calif.—A group of scientists led by researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has engineered a type of artificial optical material—a metamaterial—with a particular three-dimensional structure such that light exhibits a negative index of refraction upon entering the material.

Event - Chemistry - 20.04.2010
University of Bristol selected as Strategic Partner
University of Bristol selected as Strategic Partner
The University of Bristol has been selected as a Strategic Alliance Partner by leading defence firm AWE. The alliance, which was confirmed at an official signing ceremony, will see the two organisations working closer together across a range of research areas.

Agronomy / Food Science - Chemistry - 20.04.2010
Common as dirt is our most precious bank about to go bust?
Common as dirt is our most precious bank about to go bust?
Matt Fortnam in the Department of Earth Sciences talks to Professor Vala Ragnarsdottir, co-ordinator of the European SoilCritZone project, about the importance of soil, and draws comparisons between the global financial crash and the impending global soil crisis.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.04.2010
Former Hopkins Marine Station Director John Phillips dead at 84
Former Hopkins Marine Station Director John Phillips dead at 84
When John Phillips raised concerns about the effects of DDT and other chemicals on fish, ocean plants and pelicans, the idea that pollutants from the land and air could harm marine life was unexpected and astonishing.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 19.04.2010
Pressure-cooking algae into a better biofuel
Researchers heat algae in a device that acts like a pressure cooker to turn the algae into a crude biooil.

Health - Chemistry - 18.04.2010
You had me at hello: frisky yeast know who to shmoo after two minutes
Yeast cells decide whether to have sex with each other within two minutes of meeting, according Dr. Vahid Shahrezaei of Imperial College London, whose new insights into how yeast cells decide to mate could be helpful for researchers looking at how cancer cells and stem cells develop.

Health - Chemistry - 14.04.2010
Forum drives University innovations toward marketplace
Forum drives University innovations toward marketplace
Groves, a chemistry professor at Princeton University, told a panel of business leaders gathered on campus April 8 that a new technology he helped develop could catch dangerous side effects of drugs in the earliest stages of development, long before they would be tested in humans.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 13.04.2010
Engineering the chemistry of biology
Engineering the chemistry of biology
Professor Dek Woolfson is based in the School of Chemistry and holds a joint appointment with the Department of Biochemistry, because his research is done at the interface between chemistry and biology.

Environment - Chemistry - 12.04.2010
Researchers visit desert in the Middle East to explore storing greenhouse gases deep underground
Researchers visit desert in the Middle East to explore storing greenhouse gases deep underground
Researchers visit desert in the Middle East to explore storing greenhouse gases deep underground Imperial scientists document recent field trip to Oman, and the work they are carrying in $70 million international research project, in new video ?

Physics - Chemistry - 11.04.2010
Researchers harness viruses to split water
Researchers harness viruses to split water
Angela Belcher, the Germeshausen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering, demonstrates a virus-templated catalyst solution used in harnessing energy from water. Photo: Dominick Reuter CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? A team of MIT researchers has found a novel way to mimic the process by which plants use the power of sunlight to split water and make chemical fuel to power their growth.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 08.04.2010
Invasive fish and mussels team up to transfer toxic substances into Great Lakes walleyes
Invasive fish and mussels team up to transfer toxic substances into Great Lakes walleyes
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Two notorious Great Lakes invaders—the zebra mussel and the round goby—now play a central role in transferring toxic chemicals called PCBs up the food chain and into Saginaw Bay walleyes, one of that region's most popular sport fish.

Physics - Chemistry - 06.04.2010
Cold Atoms and Nanotubes Come Together in an Atomic ’Black Hole’
Physicists at Harvard University have found that a high-voltage nanotube can cause cold atoms to spiral inward under dramatic acceleration before disintegrating violently. Their experiments, the first to demonstrate something akin to a black hole at atomic scale, are described in the current issue of the journal Physical Review Letters.

Chemistry - Physics - 05.04.2010
Hold the salt: UCLA engineers develop revolutionary new desalination membrane
Researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science have unveiled a new class of reverse-osmosis membranes for desalination that resist the clogging which typically occurs when seawater, brackish water and waste water are purified.

Physics - Chemistry - 31.03.2010
Nanoscale 'stealth' probe slides into cell walls seamlessly, say Stanford engineers
Nanoscale ’stealth’ probe slides into cell walls seamlessly, say Stanford engineers
Stanford engineers have created a nanoscale probe they can implant in a cell wall without damaging the wall. The probe could allow researchers to listen in on electrical signals within the cell. That could lead to a better understanding of how cells communicate or how a cell responds to medication. The probe could also provide a better way of attaching neural prosthetics and with modification, might be an avenue for inserting medication inside a cell.

Physics - Chemistry - 31.03.2010
Movement of atoms viewed at 100 times higher resolution than ever before
05 May 2005 Joint news release from University of Sheffield and University of Warwick Movement of atoms viewed at 100 times higher resolution than ever before A paper published in Nature, by scientis

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 31.03.2010
Irritating winged insect opens doors in Alzheimer research
Irritating winged insect opens doors in Alzheimer research
A research group at the School of Biotechnology at KTH together with the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala and Cambridge University has taken a step forward in Alzheimer research. They have been helped by the fruit fly. Together the researchers from the three schools of learning describe how a new molecule can prevent a poisonous protein which it is considered causes Alzheimer's disease from accumulating in the brain.

Chemistry - Physics - 30.03.2010
Nanotechnology grants to convert carbon dioxide by emulating nature
Nanotechnology grants to convert carbon dioxide by emulating nature
Professor Nora De Leeuw (UCL Chemistry) has won £1.1 million from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to lead a project that aims to produce a catalytic reactor that

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 30.03.2010
Plastic electronics could slash the cost of solar panels
Plastic electronics could slash the cost of solar panels
A new technique developed by Princeton University engineers for producing electricity-conducting plastics could dramatically lower the cost of manufacturing solar panels.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.03.2010
International scientists discuss impact of research on global challenges
International scientists discuss impact of research on global challenges
Liverpool, UK - 30 March 2010: World renowned scientists will take part in the University of Liverpool¿s `Science and Society¿ public lecture series to discuss the impact scientific research can have on global communities. Speakers in the series include, crew member of Space Shuttle Columbia, Professor Larry DeLucas ; former Chairman of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Council, Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith ; and scientist from the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Dr Yousoo Kim.

Linguistics / Literature - Chemistry - 29.03.2010
Coupa Café opens library kiosk
Coupa Café opens library kiosk
The long-awaited opening of the Stanford Libraries' kiosk is at hand. Coupa Café will serve a variety of freshly prepared food items as well as organic coffee drinks, teas, chais and other beverages.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.03.2010
Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los Alamos
LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 25, 2010—Self-repairing materials within nuclear reactors may one day become a reality as a result of research by Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists.

Health - Chemistry - 24.03.2010
Scientists open lab space to develop new technology to address metabolic diseases
Scientists open lab space to develop new technology to address metabolic diseases
Scientists open lab space to develop new technology to address metabolic diseases Researchers will develop new technology for people with Type 1 diabetes %0A " Thursday 25 March 2010 By Colin Smith S

Chemistry - 23.03.2010
Technology makes haste with waste
) method could reduce the substantial cost of cleaning up areas contaminated with industrial waste by around half, say the University researchers who have developed the technology. safely removes toxic chemicals left behind in soil and groundwater. It burns substances such as oils and petrochemicals away in a controlled combustion reaction, but the process stops once the contaminants are removed - leaving the original soil or groundwater behind.

Chemistry - Environment - 23.03.2010
£1.4 million to make car fuel from thin air
£1.4 million to make car fuel from thin air
The researchers hope the porous materials will be used to line factory chimneys to take carbon dioxide pollutants from the air, reducing the effects of climate change.

Physics - Chemistry - 23.03.2010
Silicon Valley in the Vienna Prater
Researchers at Vienna University of Technology's Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics are really happy about the accreditation of their X-ray laboratory, which is the only one of its type in Austria.

Health - Chemistry - 22.03.2010
Sir James Black OM (1924-2010): notice of death
Sir James Black OM (1924-2010): notice of death
Sir James Black OM was Emeritus Professor of Analytical Pharmacology at King's College London.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.03.2010
UCLA's CNSI, Kyoto University institute to collaborate on research, academic exchanges
UCLA’s CNSI, Kyoto University institute to collaborate on research, academic exchanges
The California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA and the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) at Japan's Kyoto University have signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate on international research efforts and academic exchanges.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.03.2010
Gel helps cleft palates heal
As today's Daily Mail reports the breakthrough comes from work by researchers at Oxford University, the John Radcliffe Hospital, and the Georgia Institute of Technology using STFC 's ISIS neutron source.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.03.2010
Scientists go into battle to disarm superbug
Scientists go into battle to disarm superbug
Scientists go into battle to disarm superbug Imperial researchers talk about tackling %0A " By Lucy Goodchild Friday 19 March 2010 Two recent pieces of research from Imperial reveal new ways of tackl

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 18.03.2010
Designs on science go on show
Designs on science go on show
PA 56/10 Unique research into 'artificial life' forms at The University of Nottingham is being showcased in an unusual exhibition at the Royal College of Art in London.

Chemistry - Health - 17.03.2010
Using stem cells to mend damaged hips
Using stem cells to mend damaged hips
PA 54/10 Scientists at The University of Nottingham are aiming to take their innovative lab-based tissue engineering technology closer to the clinic as part of a research project that could revolutionise hip replacement operations in the future.

Chemistry - Health - 17.03.2010
Campus plans to contest Cal/OSHA fines in November 2007 lab fire
UCLA plans to contest citations and $23,900 in fines proposed by the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) in connection with a November 2007 accident in a campus chemistry and biochemistry laboratory.

Physics - Chemistry - 15.03.2010
Computer model predicts how materials meet in the middle
Computer model predicts how materials meet in the middle
Computer model predicts how materials meet in the middle Watch a video of Imperial researchers explaining how they are predicting the structure of interfaces in materials, and why this is important

Physics - Chemistry - 09.03.2010
IBEX Satellite finds ribbon-like structure at edge of heliosphere
Science paper to describe unexpected structural features shown by LANL camera The invisible structures of space are becoming less so, as scientists look out to the far edges of the solar wind bubble that separates our solar system from the interstellar cloud through which it flies. Using the High Energy Neutral Atom Imager, led by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the NASA Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has sent back data that indicates a "noodle soup" of solar material has accumulated at the outer fringes of the heliosphere bubble.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.03.2010
Chemical competition: Research identifies new mechanism regulating embryonic development
Chemical competition: Research identifies new mechanism regulating embryonic development
A Princeton University-led research team has discovered that protein competition over an important enzyme provides a mechanism to integrate different signals that direct early embryonic development. The work suggests that these signals are combined long before they interact with the organism's DNA, as was previously believed, and also may inform new therapeutic strategies to fight cancer.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.03.2010
Five Faculty Members Named 2010 Sloan Research Fellows
Five Columbia faculty members were named research fellows by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which awards two-year, $50,000 grants to support the work of exceptional young researchers early in their academic careers. They were honored along with 118 scientists, mathematicians and economists. Navin Kartik , an associate professor of economics, does research in the fields of applied microeconomic theory and political economy, primarily using game theory models.

Chemistry - Environment - 08.03.2010
Adaptable, New Building is Catalyst for Discovery
Adaptable, New Building is Catalyst for Discovery
To facilitate the ever-evolving advancements in the chemical field today, the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) is opening the new Warren and Katharine Schlinger Laboratory for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.03.2010
Strength is shore thing for sea shell scientists
Scientists have made synthetic 'sea shells' from a mixture of chalk and polystyrene cups – and produced a tough new material that could make our homes and offices more durable.

Physics - Chemistry - 07.03.2010
New sensor array detects single molecules for the first time
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. ? MIT chemical engineers have built a sensor array that, for the first time, can detect single molecules of hydrogen peroxide emanating from a single living cell.

Chemistry - Physics - 07.03.2010
MIT scientists transform polyethylene into a heat-conducting material
The new method involves pulling a thin thread of material (top) from a liquid solution (bottom), and in the process the individual polymer filaments, which start out as a tangled mass, become very highly aligned.

Health - Chemistry - 05.03.2010
2 from UC San Diego Elected to National Academy of Sciences Governing Council
Two scientists from UC San Diego have been elected to the governing council of the National Academy of Sciences, the nation's preeminent organization of scientists, which advises Congress and the U.S. government on matters of science and technology.

Chemistry - Physics - 05.03.2010
Thomas Pigford, influential voice in nuclear policy, dies at 87
Thomas Pigford, professor emeritus and founding chair of the Department of Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and an influential voice in nuclear policy, has died at the age of 87.