Four UCL researchers honoured with Philip Leverhulme Prizes

Four UCL academics have been honoured with a prestigious 2020 Philip Leverhulme Prize, in recognition of the international impact and exceptionally promising potential of their research.

Dr Hernán Burbano (UCL Genetics, Evolution & Environment), Dr Emily Dawson (UCL Science & Technology Studies), Professor Paul Davies (UCL Laws) and Dr Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (UCL History) have each received a Philip Leverhulme Prize from the Leverhulme Trust. The prizes are worth £100,000 and can be spread over a twoor three-year period.

Philip Leverhulme Prizes have been awarded annually since 2001 in commemoration of the contribution to the work of the Trust made by Philip Leverhulme, the Third Viscount Leverhulme and grandson of William Hesketh Lever, the founder of the Trust.

Each year, up to 30 UK university researchers from different academic disciplines are selected to receive a Philip Leverhulme Prize. The disciplines change annually and in 2020, prizes were awarded to researchers in Biological Sciences; History; Law; Mathematics and Statistics; Philosophy and Theology; Sociology and Social Policy.

Dr Burbano is an Associate Professor in the Centre for Life’s Origins and Evolution (CLOE) in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment. He received his prize in Biological Sciences. His research combines the use of modern and ancient DNA to study different aspects of the evolution of animals, plants and microbes.

Dr Dawson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies, within the Faculty of Mathematical & Physical Sciences. She received the prize for her work on the sociology of science, education and cultural studies, exploring and challenging the co-construction of science and structural inequalities everyday life and popular culture.

Professor Davies is Professor of Commercial Law within the Faculty of Laws. He received the prize for his work on private law of England and Wales, with a particular focus on commercial law. The prize will allow him to concentrate on substantial research projects concerning the limits of contract law and overlapping claims and remedies in private law.

Dr Sutcliffe-Braithwaite is a historian of twentieth-century Britain within the Department of History. She was awarded the prize for her work on post-1945 British social, cultural, political and economic history. She is currently working on a project on women’s experiences and activism in the miners’ strike of 1984-5. 


This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |