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Health - Life Sciences - 07.11.2011
Research aims to prevent diabetic kidney failure
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. The enzyme arginase-2 plays a major role in kidney failure, and blocking the action of this enzyme might lead to protection against renal disease in diabetes, according to researchers. "We believe these arginase inhibitors may be one of the new targets that can slow down the progression of, or even prevent the development of, end-stage renal disease," said Alaa S. Awad, assistant professor of nephrology, Penn State College of Medicine.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.11.2011
Novartis DEB025 data showed viral clearance as early as six weeks and potential for interferon-free therapy in hepatitis C patients
Phase II data showed oral once daily DEB025 plus ribavirin provided viral clearance in almost half of genotype 2 and 3 patients with hepatitis C DEB025 targets host proteins required for hepatitis C virus replication, showing activity across genotypes and high barrier to resistance More than 170 million people worldwide suffer from hepatitis C, a serious liver disease that can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and in some cases death Basel, Novemb

Health - Administration - 04.11.2011
Medical Center Appoints Faculty Members as Special Advisors for Community Health Affairs
VIDEO: Richard Mayeux discusses ongoing Alzheimer's Disease research. MEDIA INQUIRIES Main number: (212) 305-3900 cumcnews [a] columbia (p) edu Community Leaders Applaud CUMC's New Special Advisors for Community Health Affairs Published: October 31, 2011 Rep.

Health - Economics / Business - 04.11.2011
The Who rock icons launch Daltrey/Townshend Teen and Young Adult Cancer Program at UCLA
The Who rock icons launch Daltrey/Townshend Teen and Young Adult Cancer Program at UCLA
In a heartfelt repayment of that debt, the two today announced the launch of the UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program, which will serve teens and young adult cancer patients at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.

Health - Economics / Business - 04.11.2011
UCLA Operation Mend founder named special grand marshal for NYC Veterans Day parade
UCLA Operation Mend founder named special grand marshal for NYC Veterans Day parade
( Editors: This press release contains information about a member of your community .

Physics - Health - 04.11.2011
Welcome back and thank you, Mars500
Welcome back and thank you, Mars500
The record-breaking simulated mission to Mars has ended with smiling faces after 17 months. Mars500's six brave volunteers stepped out of their 'spacecraft' today to be welcomed by the waiting scientists - happy that the venture had worked even better than expected.

Health - Economics / Business - 04.11.2011
We are what we eat. We eat what we believe ... And what we believe may protect us against obesity
A new series of studies identifies social norms that protect against obesity Social norms - shared beliefs about what is socially appropriate that lead to an obligation to behave in a certain way - have a profound effect on eating behaviours.

Health - 04.11.2011
Dancing their falls away
Dancing their falls away
Foxtrot, salsa, rumba! Twice weekly ballroom dancing classes for senior citizens could bring back the balance and strength needed to prevent falls in elderly Australians, according to University of Sydney researchers. A multi-centre project titled The effectiveness of social dancing as a strategy to prevent falls in older people: a cluster randomised controlled trial has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and will be led by Dafna Merom, an Honorary Associate at the University of Sydney's School of Public Health and co-appointee at the University of Western Sydney.

Health - 04.11.2011
Commercial weight loss services more effective than primary care
Commercial weight management programmes are more successful and cost less than those offered by primary care facilities such as GP surgeries and pharmacies, according to research from the University of Birmingham published on online by the British Medical Journal today (November 4).

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
First Proof of Principle for Treating Rare Bone Disease
PHILADELPHIA - Scientists at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine Center for Research in FOP and Related Disorders have developed a new genetic approach to specifically block the damaged copy of the gene for a rare bone disease, while leaving the normal copy untouched. Lead author Josef Kaplan, PhD, postdoctoral fellow; and senior authors Eileen M. Shore, PhD , and Frederick S. Kaplan, MD , both from the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, published this new proof-of-principle approach for treating the disease, called FOP, in the online edition of Gene Therapy .

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Obituary: Bernard Sarnat, 99, UCLA professor, pioneer in field of craniofacial biology
Obituary: Bernard Sarnat, 99, UCLA professor, pioneer in field of craniofacial biology
Bernard G. Sarnat, D.D.S., an eminent plastic surgeon and research scientist who made pioneering contributions to the understanding of craniofacial development and the causes of facial deformities, died Oct.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
University of Birmingham expert spearheads campaign to boost antibiotic research
A top UK microbiologist from the University of Birmingham is championing a major campaign calling for urgent new investment in antibiotic research.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2011
Researchers identify brain cells responsible for keeping us awake
Bright light arouses us. Bright light makes it easier to stay awake. Very bright light not only arouses us but is known to have antidepressant effects.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Adolescent amphetamine use linked to permanent changes in brain function and behaviour
Amphetamine use in adolescence can cause neurobiological imbalances and increase risk-taking behaviour, and these effects can persist into adulthood, even when subjects are drug free. These are the conclusions of a new study using animal models conducted by McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) researcher Gabriella Gobbi and her colleagues.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.11.2011
Researchers awarded grants to help sick babies and children
Three leading research teams at the University of Bristol have been given more than £400,000 in grants to carry out studies which aim to help reduce the suffering of sick babies and children.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2011
Biologists Use Flies and Mice to Get to the Heart of Down Syndrome
A novel study involving fruit flies and mice has allowed biologists to identify two critical genes responsible for congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome, a major cause of infant mortality and death in people born with this genetic disorder.

Health - 03.11.2011
First-ever Procedure in Region’s Only Hybrid Operating Room
UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center experts have performed San Diego's first-ever coronary revascularization procedure using a hybrid operating room, the only facility of its kind in the region.

Health - 02.11.2011
English diet could save 4,000 Scottish, Welsh and Irish lives
English diet could save 4,000 Scottish, Welsh and Irish lives
Around 4,000 deaths could be prevented every year if the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish adopted the average diet eaten in England, Oxford University researchers have calculated.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
New medication effectively treats underlying cause of cystic fibrosis
A new study has confirmed that the drug, ivacaftor ( VX-770), significantly improves lung function in some people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The results of the phase III clinical trial study, "A CFTR Potentiator in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis and the G551D Mutation,” led by Bonnie W. Ramsey of Seattle Children's Research Institute and the UW were published today, Nov.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2011
Hospital tests reveal the secrets of an Egyptian mummy
Hospital tests reveal the secrets of an Egyptian mummy
CHAMPAIGN, lll. An ancient Egyptian mummy has had quite an afterlife, traveling more than 6,000 miles, spending six decades in private hands, and finally, in 1989, finding a home at the World Heritage Museum (now the Spurlock Museum) at the University of Illinois. The mummy's travels did not end there, however.

Health - History / Archeology - 02.11.2011
Celebrating 90 Years of Insulin
Ninety years after Frederick Banting , Charles Best , John Macleod and Bertram Collip uncovered the role of insulin in diabetes, the legacy of their ground-breaking discovery has a place to call home.

Health - 02.11.2011
Memory-Enhancing Drug May Improve Exposure Therapy for PTSD Patients, Study Shows
AUSTIN, Texas — A memory-enhancing drug may improve the speed and effectiveness of prolonged exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, according to a new pilot study by psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin, the University of Washington and the University of Pennsylvania.

Health - Social Sciences - 02.11.2011
Promise for teen suicide prevention
Roughly 1 million people die by suicide each year. In the U.S., where nearly 36,000 people take their own lives annually, more than 4,600 victims are between the ages of 10 and 24, making suicide the third leading cause of death in this age group. Youths treated at hospital emergency rooms for suicidal behavior remain at very high risk for future suicide attempts.

Health - Environment - 02.11.2011
Increased use of bikes for commuting offers economic, health benefits
Cutting out short auto trips and replacing them with mass transit and active transport would yield major health benefits, according to a study just published in the scientific journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Health - Psychology - 02.11.2011
Desperate for a chocolate biscuit There’s an app for that
Beating comfort eating with help from your mobile A free app for iPhone, which is designed to help people tackle the habit of comfort eating and reduce the amount of high fat, high salt and high sugar snack food they consume, is being launched today (November 2) by the University of Birmingham.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Daughter cells receive the same number of chromosomes
Scientists at Warwick Medical School have uncovered the molecular process of how cells are by-passing the body's inbuilt 'health checkpoint' with cells that carry unequal numbers of chromosomes that have a higher risk of developing cancer. Studying simple yeast cells, scientists now understand the mechanism by which cells ensure their daughter cells receive the correct number of chromosomes.

Environment - Health - 01.11.2011
Academic’s ’Geog Blog’ to tell of his week in Westminster
PA340/11 Physical geographer Simon Gosling is to blog his way through Parliament this week when he shadows Barry Gardiner, Labour MP for Brent North, at Westminster.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.11.2011
Pulsating Response to Stress in Bacteria
Pulsating Response to Stress in Bacteria
If the changing seasons are making it chilly inside your house, you might just turn the heater on. That's a reasonable response to a cold environment: switching to a toastier and more comfortable state until it warms up outside. And so it's no surprise that biologists have long thought cells would respond to their environment in a similar way.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 01.11.2011
Obesity: Genes are the loaded gun, 'but environment pulls the trigger'
Obesity: Genes are the loaded gun, ’but environment pulls the trigger’
Universities need to work with industry to develop realistic solutions to harmonize food systems with human health, according to panelists at a Morrison Hall symposium on Oct.

Health - Economics / Business - 01.11.2011
UCLA helps convert East L.A. corner stores from ’food deserts’ into healthy food oases
To determine whether stores that prominently display healthy food items while relegating chips, soda and candy to the back of the store can be financially sustainable and improve the health behaviors

Health - 01.11.2011
Yoga aids chronic back pain sufferers
Yoga can provide more effective treatment for chronic lower back pain than more conventional methods, according to the UK's largest ever study into the benefits of yoga. The study, by the Universities of York and Manchester and funded by Arthritis Research UK, found that people offered a specially-designed 12-week yoga programme experienced greater improvements in back function and more confidence in performing everyday tasks than those offered conventional forms of GP care.

Health - 01.11.2011
Lack of part-time jobs in senior or well paid roles force new mothers to abandon successful careers
New research from the University of Warwick suggests many women in the UK are being forced to go back to work full-time or abandon their careers after having a child because of a lack of part-time work, particularly those in senior or highly-paid roles. A new paper published in Work, Employment and Society , shows that more higher-paid mothers go back to work full-time in the UK, whereas lower-paid mothers are more likely to go back to work part-time.

Health - 01.11.2011
Pioneering treatment extends to China
Pioneering treatment extends to China
Surgical treatment which is helping thousands of British breast cancer patients could soon be helping patients in China.

Computer Science - Health - 01.11.2011
New algorithm could substantially speed up MRI scans
Faster scans could reduce the time patients spend in the machine from 45 to 15 minutes. CAMBRIDGE, Mass.

Health - 01.11.2011
Switching drugs improves breast cancer patient survival rates
Adapted from a news release issued by the Institute of Cancer Research Monday 31 October 2011 Changing to exemestane after two to three years of tamoxifen treatment can cut women's risk of dying from breast cancer, according to long-term follow-up data from the Intergroup Exemestane Study published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Cancer-causing bacterium spurs cell death
Cancer-causing bacterium spurs cell death
CHAMPAIGN, lll. Researchers report they have figured out how the cancer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori attacks a cell's energy infrastructure, sparking a series of events in the cell that ultimately lead it to self-destruct. H. pylori are the only bacteria known to survive in the human stomach.

Health - Administration - 01.11.2011
University launches HE taster course for injured servicemen
Plymouth University has launched the first HE taster course specifically designed to create skills and career development pathways for injured servicemen and women.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2011
Not all women in breast cancer families share high risk
Mothers, sisters and daughters from breast cancer families with known genetic mutations do not all share the same high risk of developing the disease, according to a new international study involving the University of Melbourne. Women with the breast cancer genetic mutations BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at least 10 times more likely to develop breast cancer than the average woman.

Health - 01.11.2011
Blue-Sky grants benefit medical research
A team headed by haematologist John Rasko has won one of two inaugural Blue-Sky Grants, awarded by the Sir Zelman Cowen Universities Fund, to continue its research into human cell reproduction.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 31.10.2011
Royal visit for new chair in motor neurone research
Royal visit for new chair in motor neurone research
Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal attended a lecture today to mark the appointment of Professor Kevin Talbot to the new Chair of Motor Neuron Biology at the University of Oxford. The position will support research into motor neurone disease with the aim of increasing understanding of this complex disease.

Health - 31.10.2011
New name for NHS Trust reflects ties with University
New name for NHS Trust reflects ties with University
A single NHS Trust to run Oxfordshire's four teaching hospitals starts work today under the new name Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust.

Health - 31.10.2011
An Ounce of Prevention
Nursing professor LaRon Nelson is dedicating his research career to preventing HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among socially marginalized groups in African and African diaspora communities. Nelson feels this focus is essential not only because these groups are most at risk of STDs, but because they often experience significant barriers to accessing health care.

Health - 31.10.2011
Stroke victims don't fare as well in poorer countries
People living in poor countries or countries that spend proportionately less on health-care are about 30 per cent more likely to have a stroke, a new study by St. Michael's Hospital and the University of Toronto shows. They are also more likely to die from a stroke within 30 days, have a stroke at a younger age or have a hemorrhagic stroke - a more severe type caused by a burst blood vessel bleeding in or near the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2011
Biotech Innovator Jonathan Rothberg To Speak at Carnegie Mellon Nov. 3
CMU Alumnus, Trustee's Work on DNA Sequencing Could Lead to Treatments for Genetic Diseases : Ken Walters / 412-268-1151 / walters1 [a] andrew.cmu (p) edu PITTSBURGH—Jonathan Rothberg (E

Health - Economics / Business - 31.10.2011
Flexible covering to combat water damage wins 2011 Innovation Prize
31 October 2011 In order to promote research, development and entrepreneurship in Skåne, PwC and the Lund University Innovation System (LUIS), in collaboration with Lund Municipality, award an annual Innovation Prize of SEK 250 000.

Health - Psychology - 31.10.2011
Children of deployed military at greater risk of engaging in violent behavior
Adolescent boys with at least one parent in the military are at elevated risk of engaging in school-based physical fighting, carrying a weapon and joining a gang, according to researchers at the University of Washington's School of Public Health.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.10.2011
A dog's life: £500k study launched into man's best friend
A dog’s life: £500k study launched into man’s best friend
31 Oct 2011 University of Manchester researchers have launched one of the largest studies into the relationship between man and his 'best friend' to explore how humans have influenced the characteristics of domestic dogs through breeding, feeding, training and socialising.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.10.2011
Golden opportunity for muscle disorders
Golden opportunity for muscle disorders
Finding treatments or even a cure for lifelong, unrelenting muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy and motor neuron disease will be the focus of a new national research centre.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2011
Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function
Antibody library project could unlock mysteries of human gene function
By looking at antibodies, researchers can identify where, in a cell, genes are active and under what conditions they increase or decrease their expression. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 31, 2011—A National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division could help unravel the gnarly secrets of how many human genes function.