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Social Sciences - Health - 21.10.2011
The Way We Sentence Criminals Needs to Change
Should prison sentences be based on crimes that have not been committed yet? That's the question several recent news articles have been posing. One such article highlighted how in Pennsylvania, judges could soon consider a new dimension when it comes to sentencing: the future. The article describes how judges may start using statistical assessments of the probability of recidivism in the sentencing process.

Health - Environment - 20.10.2011
Research eyes energy-saving fluoros
Research eyes energy-saving fluoros
The global trend towards using fluorescent globes instead of incandescent ones as a strategy to beat climate change could be increasing eye disease, according to new research by scientists at The Australian National University.

Health - Environment - 20.10.2011
Bridging the global divide: Manchester stakes its claim
20 Oct 2011 Lord David Owen is to be guest speaker at a special meeting in Manchester next week to launch a new initiative that is guaranteed to put the city at the forefront of global health.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.10.2011
Of mice and women: Ithaca-Weill collaborations boost research and recruiting, say panelists
Of mice and women: Ithaca-Weill collaborations boost research and recruiting, say panelists
Of mice and women: Ithaca-Weill collaborations boost research and recruiting, say panelists Collaborations between researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Ithaca campus yield results that might otherwise be impossible, according to an Oct.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.10.2011
U of T well represented in Canadian Medical Hall of Fame
An insulin pioneer, a scientist who has elevated the prominence of medical research and a leading geneticist, all of whom worked at the University of Toronto , will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in March.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2011
Autistic brains develop more slowly than healthy brains, UCLA researchers say
Researchers at UCLA have found a possible explanation for why autistic children act and think differently than their peers. For the first time, they've shown that the connections between brain regions that are important for language and social skills grow much more slowly in boys with autism than in non-autistic children.

Health - Event - 20.10.2011
Leeds £1.5 million Investigator Award for hepatitis C virus research
Professor Mark Harris, from the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, has been appointed as a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator, with £1.5 million funding to pursue his research goals.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.10.2011
Anatomical blueprint for motor antagonism identified
Walking or movement in general, comes so naturally to us, yet it results from a sophisticated interplay between the nervous system and muscles. Little is known about the neuronal blueprint that ensures the regulation of functionally opposing motor actions, which in turn are responsible for all movement.

Physics - Health - 20.10.2011
Engineering Professor Works to Make Data Transmission Secure
Dirk Englund is developing technology that tackles one of the most pressing problems of the Information Age— keeping information secure.

Health - Environment - 20.10.2011
Book on Romantic Attachment Merges Science With Self-Help
Seven years ago, when Amir Levine was in his child and adolescent psychiatry residency here at Columbia, he worked with mothers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, using attachment-based therapy to help them better bond with their children.

Health - 19.10.2011
Radiotherapy after surgery halves breast cancer recurrence
Radiotherapy after surgery halves breast cancer recurrence
Radiotherapy following surgery for breast cancer halves the chances of the cancer coming back over the next 10 years, a study led by Oxford University researchers has found. Radiotherapy also reduces the risk of dying from breast cancer over the next 15 years by one sixth. The findings, published in the Lancet medical journal, come from the largest study by far of the effects of radiotherapy for women who've had 'breast-conserving' surgery to remove the part of the breast with the cancer.

Health - 19.10.2011
UCLA gets $2.8 million from NIH to develop saliva test to diagnose Sjögren's syndrome
UCLA gets $2.8 million from NIH to develop saliva test to diagnose Sjögren’s syndrome
A multi-center clinical trial will test a new diagnostic approach for the disorder, which affects Venus Williams and millions of others In August, tennis star Venus Williams withdrew from the U&perio

Social Sciences - Health - 19.10.2011
Study Links Pollutants to a 450 Percent Increase in Risk of Birth Defects
Study Links Pollutants to a 450 Percent Increase in Risk of Birth Defects
AUSTIN, Texas — Pesticides and pollutants are related to a 450 percent increase in the risk of spina bifida and anencephaly in rural China, according to scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and Peking University.

Health - 19.10.2011
Male bowel cancer patients ’unprepared’ for erectile dysfunction
Men suffering from bowel cancer are prone to erectile dysfunction (ED) following treatment, yet most do not receive enough information about the condition, according to a study by University of Birmingham cancer experts published today (18 October).

Life Sciences - Health - 19.10.2011
Bridging the Gap
Bridging the Gap
Caltech Neuroscientists Find Normal Brain Communication in People Who Lack Connections Between Right and Left Hemispheres Like a bridge that spans a river to connect two major metropolises, the corpus callosum is the main conduit for information flowing between the left and right hemispheres of our brains.

Pedagogy - Health - 18.10.2011
Transient doctors affecting children
Transient doctors affecting children
Indigenous children and those born overseas are less likely to have a regular family doctor than all other Australian children, according to a new report by researchers at The Australian National University Medical School.

Health - 18.10.2011
False starts can sneak by in women’s sprinting
ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Olympic timing procedures don't accurately detect false starts by female sprinters, according to a new analysis by University of Michigan researchers. Under the current rules, a woman can purposely anticipate the gun by up to 20 milliseconds, or one-fiftieth of a second, without getting called for a false start, the researchers say.

Health - 18.10.2011
Remembering to Forget: Destroying Bad Memories and Breaking Bad Habits
Retrieving a memory is crucial when trying to extinguish it completely, according to research published today (18 October) by University of Birmingham scientists .

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2011
How hemp got high
A team of Canadian researchers has sequenced the genome of Cannabis sativa, the plant that produces both industrial hemp and marijuana, and in the process revealed the genetic changes that led to the plant's drug-producing properties. Jon Page is a plant biochemist and adjunct professor of biology at the University of Saskatchewan.

Health - 18.10.2011
Urology aims to get 'lean,' improve patient care
Urology aims to get ‘lean,’ improve patient care
UW Medical Center's urology clinic is currently ranked among the top 30 facilities in the country for care, according to U.S. News & World Report .

Health - History / Archeology - 18.10.2011
Experts reveal new images, analyses of Spurlock Museum mummy
Experts reveal new images, analyses of Spurlock Museum mummy
CHAMPAIGN, lll. In 1990, a team of researchers and medical experts placed an ancient Egyptian mummy into a computed tomography (CT) scanner at a hospital in Central Illinois, hoping to learn what they could about the individual shrouded inside its linen cocoon. Those scans, along with X-rays and analyses of fragments collected from the fraying base of the mummy, revealed that it was a child from a wealthy family, likely from the Roman period of ancient Egypt.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2011
New U of M startup may save lives of victims of massive blood loss and trauma
MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (10/18/2011) —A new technology from the University of Minnesota has resulted in a startup that may help prolong the lives of victims suffering from massive blood loss or trauma.

Health - 18.10.2011
Muslim leaders get help to teach smoke-free message
A new resource to help Muslim religious teachers educate their communities about the health risks of second hand smoke and the importance of having a smoke-free home is being launched in Leeds.

Health - 18.10.2011
21st century database of traditional Chinese medicine released
A comprehensive database developed by King's College London researchers that features the chemical components found in traditional Chinese medicines has been released to market this month, allowing researchers to explore age-old remedies in the search for tomorrow's new drugs. Provided under licence to Tim Tec LLC, a US-based life science company, the 'Chem-TCM' database is the most comprehensive of its kind.

Health - 18.10.2011
Research new breakthroughs
18 Oct 2011 University of Melbourne researchers have been awarded more than $1.4 million to conduct the first ever randomised clinical trial of an Australian snake antivenom.

Health - Economics / Business - 17.10.2011
Improving dialysis treatment
Improving dialysis treatment
University scientists are set to lead a major new European-wide training and research network designed to improve treatment for patients needing dialysis for kidney failure. EuTRiPD is a new ¤3.5M European network of academics, clinicians and medical businesses designed to help meet the gaps in treatment and research into Peritoneal dialysis (PD).

Health - 17.10.2011
New website launched to profile Sheffield´s clinical research
18 October 2011 New website launched to profile Sheffield´s clinical research A new website has been launched to promote clinical research in Sheffield.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2011
Study with Dr. Oz: Peer mentors help improve diets in at-risk high schools
A Cornell economist in collaboration with Oz of TV fame finds that using peer mentors in high schools is an effective way to get teens to make better food choices and get more exercise. The study's most striking finding: The mentoring program prompted high school students to cut their consumption of soda pop by 13 percent - 26 percent among girls.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2011
Worobo discovers compound in a honey that could lead to a new natural preservative
Worobo discovers compound in a honey that could lead to a new natural preservative
Honey has been used as a topical antibiotic since the Egyptians wrote papyrus prescriptions. Now, a Cornell food scientist has identified an antimicrobial compound in a honey that makes it a promising candidate as a natural preservative to prevent food-borne illness and food spoilage. Randy Worobo, associate professor of food microbiology at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, and his lab members tested more than 2,000 strains of bacteria from eight types of honey from the United States and New Zealand.

Health - Physics - 17.10.2011
Multiphoton endoscope could bring diagnostic imaging into doctors' offices
Multiphoton endoscope could bring diagnostic imaging into doctors’ offices
From precancerous lesions in the bladder to polyps in the colon, pathologists are constantly examining tissue biopsies for diagnoses.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
Vast Hidden Network Regulating Gene Expression in Cancer
VIDEO: Richard Mayeux discusses ongoing Alzheimer's Disease research. MEDIA INQUIRIES Main number: (212) 305-3900 cumcnews [a] columbia (p) edu Vast Hidden Network Regulates Gene Expression in Cancer Published: October 14, 2011 New York, NY (October 14, 2011) - Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and two other institutions have uncovered a vast new gene regulatory network in mammalian cells that could explain genetic variability in cancer and other diseases.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
Could hypertension drugs help people with Alzheimer’s?
Within the next 20 years it is expected the number of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) will double from its current figure of half a million to one million. A new study has looked at whether certain types of drugs used to treat high blood pressure, also called hypertension, might have beneficial effects in reducing the number of new cases of Alzheimer's disease each year.

Health - Economics / Business - 17.10.2011
Not so anonymous
Not so anonymous
Latanya Sweeney challenges outdated policies with a quantitative, computational approach to privacy De-identified prescription data: is it really anonymous? Latanya Sweeney aims to make personal data more secure and to provide recourse for people who are harmed by privacy breaches.

Health - 17.10.2011
TARDIS trial seeks new dimension in stroke treatment
PA311/11 People who suffer from acute stroke or Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA, a mini stroke) could get better treatment in the future thanks to the expansion of a large clinical trial of a new combination of drugs led by researchers at The University of Nottingham.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2011
King’s at the London Science Festival
King's is hosting a range of events this month as part of the first ever London Science Festival. From 21-25 October, the College will host debates, demonstrations and presentations on a diverse range of topics, ranging from how to treat a heart attack to the world of nanomaterials.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.10.2011
Novartis drug Gilenya
Novartis drug Gilenya (fingolimod) has more than 20,000 patient-years of exposure and shows up to 71% reduction in annualized relapse rates in MS patients with highly active disease Analyses presented at 5 th Joint Triennial Congress of ECTRIMS and ACTRIMS showed relapse rate reductions were consistent among subgroups of fingolimod-treated patients that had highly active disease in pivotal clinical trials Fingolimod demonstrated reductions in ra

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
Making a healthier Australia: Sydney expertise leads national funding round
17 October 2011 The groundbreaking work of University of Sydney health and medical researchers has been recognised by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in a major announcement of government funding.

Health - 17.10.2011
Researchers shine in health and research grants
17 Oct 2011 University of Melbourne researchers have been awarded more than $84 million to improve the lives of people suffering cancer, Multiple Sclerosis and vision impairment.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2011
A New Age in Brain Research Starts Today
17 Oct 2011 Melbourne will become a magnet for the world's best and brightest brain researchers with the official opening of the Melbourne Brain Centre at the University of Melbourne Parkville by the

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2011
ANU congratulates medical grant recipients
ANU congratulates medical grant recipients
ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Young has congratulated all recipients of National Health and Medical Research grants, particularly the 18 winners from The Australian National University.

Health - Economics / Business - 17.10.2011
£150m to change lives, tackle global issues and shape the future
The University of Nottingham is to launch the biggest fundraising campaign in its 130 year history. It aims to raise £150m to transform research, enrich the student experience and enable the institution to make an even greater contribution to the global communities it serves.

Health - 17.10.2011
WHO patient safety initiative led by University of Sydney academic
17 October 2011 A University of Sydney academic is behind a new World Health Organization guide that targets health complications and even deaths that occur as result of human error during patient care.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2011
Genetically Influenced Responses to Alcohol Affect Brain Activation
Genetically Influenced Responses to Alcohol Affect Brain Activation October 15, 2011 Debra Kain A study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests that differences in brain activation in individuals with a low level of response to alcohol may contribute to their inability to recognize modest levels of alcohol intoxication.

Health - Physics - 14.10.2011
More effective cancer treatment with new camera to refine radiation dose calculations
A top-ranked EU project is developing a new type of camera which can provide detailed images of tumour-homing molecules in the body.

Linguistics / Literature - Health - 14.10.2011
3D operating theatre
I stand in the operating theatre and look around. There’s the operating table and the large anaesthetic machine.