Light dark matter 1,000 times less likely to bump into regular matter than previous astrophysical analyses allowed

Light dark matter is a thousand times less likely to bump into regular matter than previous astrophysical analyses allowed

Light dark matter is a thousand times less likely to bump into regular matter than previous astrophysical analyses allowed

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Simulation of the dark matter structure surrounding the Milky Way. Driven by gravity, dark matter forms dense structures, referred to as halos (bright areas), in which galaxies are born. The number and distribution of halos, and therefore also of galaxies, depends on the properties of dark matter, such as its mass and its likelihood to interact with normal matter. (Ethan Nadler/Risa Wechsler/Ralf Kaehler/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory/Stanford University)

Astrophysics & Cosmology Dark Matter The Early Universe Particle Physics Fundamental Physics Directorate Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (PAC) Computational Astrophysics Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology (KIPAC) SLAC+Stanford Stanford University

SLAC NATIONAL ACCELERATOR LABORATORY 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025
Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science


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