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Pharmacology - Health - 08.07.2024
Seven-day buprenorphine is safe for those with minimal opioid withdrawal
Seven-day buprenorphine is safe for those with minimal opioid withdrawal
An extended-release version of buprenorphine, a treatment for opioid use disorder, can be used earlier than other medication.

Environment - Physics - 28.06.2024
Giant clams may hold the answers to making solar energy more efficient
Giant clams may hold the answers to making solar energy more efficient
In a new study, Yale researcher Alison Sweeney found that giant clams in the Western Pacific may be the most efficient solar energy system on the planet. Solar panel and biorefinery designers could learn a thing or two from iridescent giant clams living near tropical coral reefs, according to a new Yale-led study.

Career - Health - 24.06.2024
Rising health care prices are driving unemployment and job losses
When health care costs rise, employers outside the health care sector cut jobs, leading to higher unemployment among healthy middle-class wage earners. Rising health care prices in the U.S. are leading employers outside the health care sector to reduce their payroll and decrease their number of employees, according to a new study co-authored by Yale economist Zack Cooper.

Health - Life Sciences - 31.05.2024
This well-timed ’chameleon’ sneaks up on drug-resistant brain cancers
Yale scientists say KL-50, their lead "chameleon" compound, effectively targets tumors without harming healthy surrounding tissue. In a new study, Yale researchers describe how a novel chemical compound attacks drug-resistant brain tumors without harming healthy surrounding tissue. The research, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society , is a crucial step in the development of so-called "chameleon compounds" that may be used to target an array of pernicious cancers.

Health - Campus - 09.05.2024
Yale’s 323rd Commencement events to be held May 19 and 20

Health - Campus - 24.04.2024
Lax antitrust enforcement linked to rising hospital prices
Lax antitrust enforcement linked to rising hospital prices
A new study co-authored by Yale economist Zack Cooper links rising prices for hospital care to lax antitrust enforcement.

Health - Economics - 22.04.2024
Novel study quantifies immense economic costs of mental illness in the U.S
Novel study quantifies immense economic costs of mental illness in the U.S
A new Yale analysis of the economic toll of mental illness considers a host of adverse economic outcomes not considered in earlier estimates. Mental illness costs the U.S. economy $282 billion annually, which is equivalent to the average economic recession, according to a new study co-authored by Yale economist Aleh Tsyvinski.

Health - Career - 22.04.2024
Proposed changes to Medicare, Medicaid could cost thousands of lives
Proposed changes to Medicare, Medicaid could cost thousands of lives
Proposed changes to Medicare and Medicaid, including raising the age of Medicare eligibility, could lead to thousands of additional deaths, a Yale study shows. Proposed changes to the United States' Medicare and Medicaid programs could lead to thousands of additional deaths each year, a new Yale study reveals.

Health - 17.04.2024
Students with disabilities match with residency programs at lower rates
Applicants to U.S. medical residency programs who report a disability match at lower rates than their peers, especially for surgical programs, says a new study.

Social Sciences - 05.04.2024
Volunteering enhances life satisfaction among Syrian refugee women
Volunteering enhances life satisfaction among Syrian refugee women
A new study shows that participating in a volunteer program to promote literacy in children helped Syrian refugee women feel more satisfied with their lives.

Health - 12.03.2024
In the nation’s M.D.-Ph.D. programs, the socioeconomic gap widens
Fewer low-income students are applying to M.D.-Ph.D. programs while affluent students account for a greater proportion of acceptances, a Yale new study finds.

Paleontology - Art and Design - 11.03.2024
Revitalized Yale Peabody Museum to reopen March 26
Revitalized Yale Peabody Museum to reopen March 26

Health - 28.02.2024
Risk of hospital readmission after surgery is high for older Americans
A new Yale study is the first to describe the shortand longer-term risk of hospital readmission for older persons who have had major surgery. A new Yale study finds an increased risk of hospital readmission for older Americans within 180 days of undergoing major surgery - a risk that is particularly acute for individuals who are frail or have dementia.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.12.2023
Treating opioid disorder without meds more harmful than no treatment at all
Treating opioid disorder without meds more harmful than no treatment at all
Non-medication-based treatments for opioid use disorder may be more harmful than no treatment at all, a new Yale study finds.

Life Sciences - 30.11.2023
Distinct brain activity triggered by memories of trauma
Distinct brain activity triggered by memories of trauma
Recollections of traumatic events among people with PTSD trigger markedly different brain activity than when remembering sad or -neutral- experiences. It is well known that people who have lived through traumatic events like sexual assault, domestic abuse, or violent combat can experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), including terrifying flashbacks, severe anxiety, and uncontrollable thoughts about the incident.

Paleontology - Media - 28.11.2023
Study gives grandmother gecko a place of honor - and a new name
Study gives grandmother gecko a place of honor - and a new name
Helioscopus dickersonae lived in North America in the late Jurassic period, 100 million years earlier than any previously known early gecko relative.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 06.11.2023
The last turn of 'Ezekiel's Wheel' honors a Yale-affiliated fossil hunter
The last turn of ’Ezekiel’s Wheel’ honors a Yale-affiliated fossil hunter
Yale paleontologists have identified a -problematic- fossil as an ancient sea creature that lived in the plankton 420 million years ago. The mystery of Ezekiel's Wheel - the extinct sea creature, not the Biblical vision - may have taken its final turn, thanks to Yale paleontologists. In so doing, the researchers have also finally put a scientific name to the favorite fossil of a beloved amateur fossil hunter.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.10.2023
Fish, reconsidered: An updated ’Tree of Life’ draws surprising connections
In a major new work, Yale ichthyologist Thomas Near revises branches of the Tree of Life concerning most fish species based on the latest scientific knowledge.

Health - Environment - 31.08.2023
Health burden of air pollution differs across racial groups
Air pollution has decreased across the U.S., but new research finds health burdens remain unequal among racial groups. Health benefits that have resulted from reductions in fine particulate air pollution aren-t distributed equally among populations in the U.S., a new Yale-led study finds. Racial and ethnic minorities - and Black people in particular - still experience disproportionately high rates of cardiovascular disease-related deaths caused by exposure to fine particulate matter, according to the research.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2023
Study sheds light on origins, changeability of blood stem cells in humans
Study sheds light on origins, changeability of blood stem cells in humans
A group of researchers at Yale School of Medicine has found that levels of diversity of blood stem cells are determined during the development of the embryo. All humans have a diverse set of blood stem cell types which dictate the composition and function of our blood and immune cells and ultimately help govern overall health.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 27.06.2023
Clues in the clay: Scientists narrow the search for the first animals
Clues in the clay: Scientists narrow the search for the first animals
Using a particular type of sedimentary rocks as their guide, researchers begin to tackle the question of when animals first appeared on Earth.

Health - Career - 27.06.2023
Women transition to independent research grants at lower rates than men
Transitioning to independent research is an important career junction in biomedicine. A new study finds women make this transition at lower rates than men.

Health - 19.04.2023
As pandemic prison populations fell, proportion of Black prisoners rose
Yale researchers, colleagues say pandemic rise in proportion of Black prisoners highlights racial disparities in sentencing. The U.S. prison population plummeted during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic but the percentage of incarcerated Black people rose, according to a new analysis of prison data published April 19 in the journal Nature.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.01.2023
Loophole enables FDA approval of unsafe medical devices, Yale study finds
Manufacturers, through a loophole in the law, can use an unsafe medical device as a basis for FDA authorization to bring it to market.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.12.2022
Driver of cystic fibrosis lung inflammation yields target for treatment
Driver of cystic fibrosis lung inflammation yields target for treatment
Yale researchers have uncovered a driver of the chronic inflammation that damages lungs in cystic fibrosis. It could be a target for treatment. Yale researchers have identified a possible driver of the persistent inflammation that causes irreversible lung damage in patients with cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder that impairs breathing and digestion.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size
The Northern Treeshrew defies two of the most widely tested ecological -rules- of body size variation within species, a new study finds.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.11.2022
Higher weight is linked to poor brain health in children
Higher weight is linked to poor brain health in children
Yale-led study links higher weight in children with structural and functional brain impairments, which could contribute to reduced academic performance. The relationship between weight and brain health in children is less clear than that of obesity in adults, which has consistently been linked to reduced brain health.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 21.11.2022
Going to the 'femoral head' of the class to explain dinosaur evolution
Going to the ’femoral head’ of the class to explain dinosaur evolution
A new study by Yale paleontologists charts the radical evolutionary changes to the thigh bones of dinosaurs and birds that allowed them to stand on two feet. Dinosaurs - and birds - wouldn't have been able to stand on their own two feet without some radical changes to their upper thigh bones. Now, a new study by Yale paleontologists charts the evolutionary course of these leggy alterations.

Economics - Social Sciences - 13.10.2022
Yale appoints director of new Data-Intensive Social Science Center
Yale appoints director of new Data-Intensive Social Science Center

Microtechnics - Environment - 12.10.2022
With morphing limbs, a robot that travels by land and water
Imagine being able to morph your legs into flippers before you jump in the water. Yale researchers have created a robot that accomplishes this feat through a process they dubbed -adaptive morphogenesis. The project is described in the Oct. 12 edition of Nature and is featured on the issue's cover. The robot, ART (Amphibious Robotic Turtle), takes inspiration from water and land turtles, a group whose fossil record spans over 110 million years.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 30.09.2022
What a reptile's bones can teach us about Earth's perilous past
What a reptile’s bones can teach us about Earth’s perilous past
An extinct reptile's oddly shaped chompers, fingers, and ear bones may tell us quite a bit about the resilience of life on Earth, according to a new study. In fact, paleontologists at Yale, Sam Houston State University, and the University of the Witwatersrand say the 250-million-year-old reptile, known as Palacrodon, fills in an important gap in our understanding of reptile evolution.

Health - 26.08.2022
Analysis: In a highly vaccinated state, COVID is not increasing mortality
In a new analysis, investigators at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) and Harvard indicate that in Massachusetts, a state with a high vaccination rate, the most recent wave of SARS-CoV-2 infection was not associated with an increase in mortality. The analysis, published in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases , is based on data vaccination and hospital data from Massachusetts, where about 80% of its 6.9 million residents are fully vaccinated.

Economics - 15.08.2022
Yale community investment program supports Black-owned businesses
Yale community investment program supports Black-owned businesses

Linguistics / Literature - Campus - 11.08.2022
Digital project supports 'bibliographic turn' in Black literary studies
Digital project supports ’bibliographic turn’ in Black literary studies
Yale's Jacqueline Goldsby and Meredith McGill of Rutgers University recently received a $1.7 million grant from The Mellon Foundation to support the development of The Black Bibliography Projec

Health - 02.08.2022
Culinary series celebrates perspectives on Mediterranean cuisine

Health - 14.07.2022
Most children with obesity aren’t screened properly for related conditions
Most children in the United States diagnosed with obesity do not receive recommended laboratory tests for co-occurring conditions such as diabetes and liver disease, a new Yale study finds. Many also receive potentially unnecessary tests, and both can be harmful to patients, the researchers say. The study was published July 14 in JAMA Network Open.

Health - 05.07.2022
For COVID-19, endemic stage could be two years away
Illnesses like the common cold and the flu have become endemic in human populations; everyone gets them every now and then, but for most people, they aren-t especially harmful. COVID-19 will eventually transition to endemic status at some point - but when? Possibly within two years, according to a new Yale study published July 5 in the journal PNAS Nexus.

Architecture - 29.06.2022
Architecture of the tail drives sperm forward

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
In colorful avian world, hummingbirds rule
In colorful avian world, hummingbirds rule
Yale ornithologist Richard Prum has spent years studying the molecules and nanostructures that give many bird species their rich colorful plumage, but nothing prepared him for what he found in hummingbirds. The range of colors in the plumage of hummingbirds exceeds the color diversity of all other bird species in total, Prum and a team of researchers report June 23 in the journal Communications Biology.

Environment - Health - 20.06.2022
Crossing fire threshold can quickly turn blazes dangerous
Crossing fire threshold can quickly turn blazes dangerous
Global climate change has already exacerbated the risk of fire and is likely to fuel even more change as accelerating feedback loops create disastrous consequences for both biodiversity and human populations. Yet accurately predicting the risks and impact of bush and wildfire globally is still a work in progress.

Career - Art and Design - 03.06.2022
Yale's Gilchrest honored for impact on cultural heritage conservation
Yale’s Gilchrest honored for impact on cultural heritage conservation

Health - 27.05.2022
High cost of cancer care in the U.S. doesn't reduce mortality rates
High cost of cancer care in the U.S. doesn’t reduce mortality rates
While the U.S. spends twice as much on cancer care as the average high-income country, its cancer mortality rates are only slightly better than average, according to a new analysis by researchers at Yale University and Vassar College. The results were published May 27 in JAMA Health Forum.

Event - Campus - 20.05.2022
Yale's 321st Commencement events to be held May 22 and 23
Yale’s 321st Commencement events to be held May 22 and 23

Life Sciences - 10.05.2022
When eyes meet, neurons start to fire
Their eyes met across a crowded dance floor, causing specialized neurons to begin firing in multiple regions of both brains that are tasked with deriving meaning from a social gaze. Although not as romantic as the first dance floor encounter, a new Yale study was able to chart this surprisingly widespread neuronal response in multiple brain areas when the eyes of two individuals meet and social gaze interaction happens, researchers report May 10 in the journal Neuron.

Mathematics - 26.04.2022
Researchers have a formula for getting in the flow
The immersive and often exhilarating experience of "flow" while playing sports, making art, or working is a much sought-after state of mind associated with peak creativity and productivity, which is

Campus - Event - 25.04.2022
Afro-American Cultural Center: 50 years of 'renaissance and revolution'
Afro-American Cultural Center: 50 years of ’renaissance and revolution’

Life Sciences - 21.04.2022
Life history: Scholars call for greater collaboration between zoos, museums
Life history: Scholars call for greater collaboration between zoos, museums
The animal collections housed at zoos and natural history museums - living specimens in the first case, preserved in the other - constitute an exhaustive trove of information about Earth's biodiversity.

Innovation - Economics - 12.04.2022
Yale Ventures: New initiative will promote innovation and entrepreneurship
Yale Ventures: New initiative will promote innovation and entrepreneurship

Health - 06.04.2022
Immune system culprit in severe COVID cases found
Yale researchers have identified a particular immune response pathway that leads to severe illness and death in people infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Linguistics / Literature - Event - 29.03.2022
Eight writers awarded Yale's Windham-Campbell Prizes
Eight writers awarded Yale’s Windham-Campbell Prizes
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