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Health - Life Sciences - 30.04.2024
An electrifying discovery may help doctors deliver more effective gene therapies
An electrifying discovery may help doctors deliver more effective gene therapies
In an effort to improve delivery of costly medical treatments, a team of researchers in electrical engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed a stimulating method that could make the human body more receptive to certain gene therapies. The researchers exposed liver cells to short electric pulses - and those gentle zaps caused the liver cells to take in more than 40 times the amount of gene therapy material compared to cells that were not exposed to pulsed electric fields.

Computer Science - Innovation - 26.04.2024
Popular social media apps use AI to analyze photos on your phone, introducing both bias and errors
Popular social media apps use AI to analyze photos on your phone, introducing both bias and errors
Digital privacy and security engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found that the artificial intelligence-based systems that TikTok and Instagram use to extract personal and demographic data from user images can misclassify aspects of the images. This could lead to mistakes in age verification systems or introduce other errors and biases into platforms that use these types of systems for digital services.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.04.2024
Nanomaterial that mimics proteins could be basis for new neurodegenerative disease treatments
Nanomaterial that mimics proteins could be basis for new neurodegenerative disease treatments
A newly developed nanomaterial that mimics the behavior of proteins could be an effective tool for treating Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The nanomaterial alters the interaction between two key proteins in brain cells - with a potentially powerful therapeutic effect. The innovative findings, recently published in the journal Advanced Materials , were made possible thanks to a collaboration between University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists and nanomaterial engineers at Northwestern University.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.03.2024
Some lymphomas become resistant to treatment. Gene discovery may offer path to overcome it
Patients with some types of lymphoma that become resistant to standard treatments may benefit from a therapy that University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers are evaluating after they discovered a key process that fuels the blood cancers' resistance to current drugs. Here are the details: An effective treatment, until it isn't: The UW-Madison team sought to understand why some patients with certain non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that originate in white blood cells called B cells develop resistance to drugs that have become a standard of care for the disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.02.2024
New toolkit helps scientists study natural cell death
New toolkit helps scientists study natural cell death
New research from the Weeks Lab in the Department of Biochemistry opens the door for scientists to explore cell death, a critical biochemical process, with greater ease. Here's the rundown on professor Amy Weeks and her lab's recent research and paper: Cell death is a healthy and constant part of life.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 15.02.2024
Programming cells to organize their molecules may open the door to new treatments
Researchers can engineer cells to express new genes and produce specific proteins, giving the cells new parts to work with. But, it's much harder to provide cells with instructions on how to organize and use those new parts. Now, new tools from University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers offer an innovative way around this problem.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2024
UW-Madison researchers first to 3D-print functional human brain tissue
UW-Madison researchers first to 3D-print functional human brain tissue
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists has developed the first 3D-printed brain tissue that can grow and function like typical brain tissue. It's an achievement with important implications for scientists studying the brain and working on treatments for a broad range of neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.01.2024
UW researchers uncover new clues about the cause of common birth defects
UW researchers uncover new clues about the cause of common birth defects
Cleft lip and palate are the most common craniofacial birth defects in humans, affecting more than 175,000 newborns around the world each year. Yet despite decades of research, it's still not known what causes most cases or what can be done to prevent them. But a recent study from the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) has uncovered new information about orofacial development in mice that researchers believe could one day help reduce the risk of these birth defects in humans.

Astronomy / Space - 12.01.2024
Earth-sized planet discovered in 'our solar backyard'
Earth-sized planet discovered in ’our solar backyard’
A team of astronomers have discovered a planet closer and younger than any other Earth-sized world yet identified. It's a remarkably hot world whose proximity to our own planet and to a star like our sun mark it as a unique opportunity to study how planets evolve. The new planet was described in a new study published this week by The Astronomical Journal.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.01.2024
Inner workings of an essential protein trafficking complex
Inner workings of an essential protein trafficking complex
Like mail carriers who manage to deliver their parcels through snow, rain, heat and gloom, a critical group of mammalian proteins helps cells function properly even under less-than-ideal conditions. Using state-of-the-art cell imaging and genome editing technology, University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have begun to unravel how this collection of proteins performs its essential service.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.12.2023
Newly developed material gulps down hydrogen, spits it out, protects fusion reactor walls
Newly developed material gulps down hydrogen, spits it out, protects fusion reactor walls
University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have used a spray coating technology to produce a new workhorse material that can withstand the harsh conditions inside a fusion reactor. The advance, detailed in a paper published recently in the journal Physica Scripta , could enable more efficient compact fusion reactors that are easier to repair and maintain.

Health - 05.12.2023
Prohibition may have extended life for those born in dry counties
Prohibition may have extended life for those born in dry counties
Although widely considered a blunder of public policy, the alcohol prohibition laws of early 20th century America may have led to increased longevity for those born in places where alcohol was banned, according to new research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The study - recently published in the journal Economics and Human Biology and co-authored by Jason Fletcher of UW's La Follette School of Public Affairs - is the first to research the long-term effects of Prohibition Era on longevity, adding to the understanding of the longer-term costs of alcohol exposure during pregnancy.

Health - 30.11.2023
Type 2 diabetes may contribute to racial disparities in colorectal cancer among Americans
Type 2 diabetes may contribute to racial disparities in colorectal cancer among Americans
A new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has uncovered evidence that persistent racial and socioeconomic disparities in Americans' risk of developing colorectal cancer could in part be related to differences in the occurrence of Type 2 diabetes. The study also suggests that routine cancer screenings could help cut those disparities.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 29.11.2023
Antarctica's ancient ice sheets foreshadow dynamic changes in Earth's future
Antarctica’s ancient ice sheets foreshadow dynamic changes in Earth’s future
Nineteen million years ago, during a time known as the early Miocene, massive ice sheets in Antarctica rapidly and repeatedly grew and receded. The Miocene is widely considered a potential analog for Earth's climate in the coming century, should humanity remain on its current carbon emissions trajectory.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.11.2023
MRNA vaccine harnesses T-cell power to combat COVID-19 in lungs
MRNA vaccine harnesses T-cell power to combat COVID-19 in lungs
The effectiveness of mRNA vaccines in reducing disease severity and hospitalization from COVID-19 is well established. Now, new research from the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine advances our understanding of how these vaccines protect the lungs following breakthrough infections from emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Economics - 27.10.2023
From ********* to EZacces$! Your browser extension could grab your password and sensitive info
When you type a password or credit card number into a website, you expect that your sensitive data will be protected by a system designed to keep it secure. That's not always the case, according to a group of digital security researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. They found that some popular websites are vulnerable to browser extensions that can extract user data like passwords, credit card information and social security numbers from HTML code.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.10.2023
Common chemotherapy drugs don't work like doctors thought, with big implications for drug discovery
Common chemotherapy drugs don’t work like doctors thought, with big implications for drug discovery
A new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggests that chemotherapy may not be reaching its full potential, in part because researchers and doctors have long misunderstood how some of the most common cancer drugs actually ward off tumors. For decades, researchers have believed that a class of drugs called microtubule poisons treat cancerous tumors by halting mitosis, or the division of cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.10.2023
Discovery reveals fragile X syndrome begins developing even before birth
Discovery reveals fragile X syndrome begins developing even before birth
Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, may be unfolding in brain cells even before birth, despite typically going undiagnosed until age 3 or later. A new study published today in the journal Neuron by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison showed that FMRP, a protein deficient in individuals with fragile X syndrome, has a role in the function of mitochondria, part of a cell that produces energy, during prenatal development.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2023
Remnant of cell division could be responsible for spreading cancer
Remnant of cell division could be responsible for spreading cancer
Once thought to be the trash can of the cell, a little bubble of cellular stuff called the midbody remnant is actually packing working genetic material with the power to change the fate of other cells - including turning them into cancer. It's a surprise to many people, according to Ahna Skop, a University of Wisconsin­-Madison genetics professor, that when one cell divides into two, a process called mitosis, the result is not just the two daughter cells.

Astronomy / Space - Chemistry - 19.09.2023
New recipes for origin of life may point way to distant, inhabited planets
New recipes for origin of life may point way to distant, inhabited planets
Life on a faraway planet - if it's out there - might not look anything like life on Earth. But there are only so many chemical ingredients in the universe's pantry, and only so many ways to mix them. A team led by scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has exploited those limitations to write a cookbook of hundreds of chemical recipes with the potential to give rise to life.
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