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Health - Life Sciences - 31.01.2023
Weight loss may be early predictor of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome
Weight loss may be early predictor of Alzheimer’s disease in Down syndrome
Unintentional weight loss in people with Down syndrome may predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease long before typical cognitive symptoms like memory loss and dementia are apparent. As many as 90% of people with Down syndrome experience Alzheimer's symptoms by the time they are 65, but brain changes associated with the disease appear decades earlier.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2023
New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer's gene in mice
New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice
Gene therapies have the potential to treat neurological disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, but they face a common barrier - the blood-brain barrier. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a way to move therapies across the brain's protective membrane to deliver brain-wide therapy with a range of biological medications and treatments.

Health - Psychology - 19.01.2023
Following pandemic, educators are not all right but meditation could ease burden
Following pandemic, educators are not all right but meditation could ease burden
Approaching the 3-year anniversary of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many can attest to the mental health challenges that came with the sudden changes to everyday life as the disease took hold. In schools, teachers and support staff were forced to revamp lesson plans for virtual and hybrid learning environments, all while toggling between remote and in-person duties and supervising at-home learning.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2023
New nanocapsules deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer's gene in mice
New nanocapsules deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice
Gene therapies have the potential to treat neurological disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, but they face a common barrier - the blood-brain barrier. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a way to move therapies across the brain's protective membrane to deliver brain-wide therapy with a range of biological medications and treatments.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.01.2023
A blood test for cancer shows promise thanks to machine learning
A blood test for cancer shows promise thanks to machine learning
A team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin­-Madison has successfully combined genomics with machine learning in the quest to develop accessible tests that allow earlier detection of cancer. For many types of cancer, early detection can lead to better outcomes for patients. While scientists are developing new blood tests that analyze DNA to aid in earlier detection, these new technologies have limitations, including cost and sensitivity.

Pharmacology - Health - 06.01.2023
First-in-kind psychedelic trials treat opioid and methamphetamine use disorders
First-in-kind psychedelic trials treat opioid and methamphetamine use disorders
Three million people in the United States have had opioid use disorder, and another 1.5 million people have dealt with methamphetamine misuse within the last year alone. But two new groundbreaking clinical trials out of the UW Transdisciplinary Center for Research in Psychoactive Substances (TCRPS), housed within the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy, aim to address these pressing issues with a promising psychoactive agent: psilocybin.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.01.2023
Lab-grown retinal eye cells make successful connections, open door for clinical trials to treat blindness
Lab-grown retinal eye cells make successful connections, open door for clinical trials to treat blindness
Retinal cells grown from stem cells can reach out and connect with neighbors, according to a new study, completing a "handshake" that may show the cells are ready for trials in humans with degenerative eye disorders. Over a decade ago, researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a way to grow organized clusters of cells, called organoids, that resemble the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

Physics - 18.11.2022
New carbon nanotube-based foam promises superior protection against concussions
New carbon nanotube-based foam promises superior protection against concussions
Developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers, a lightweight, ultra-shock-absorbing foam could vastly improve helmets designed to protect people from strong blows. The new material exhibits 18 times higher specific energy absorption than the foam currently used in U.S. military combat helmet liners, as well as having much greater strength and stiffness, which could allow it to provide improved impact protection.

Life Sciences - 08.11.2022
Differences between brains of primates - humans, apes and monkeys - are small but significant
Differences between brains of primates - humans, apes and monkeys - are small but significant
While the physical differences between humans and non-human primates are quite distinct, a new study reveals their brains may be remarkably similar. And yet, the smallest changes may make big differences in developmental and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the molecular differences that make the human brain distinct can help researchers study disruptions in its development.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.11.2022
UW-Madison researchers key in revealing neutrinos emanating from galactic neighbor with a gigantic black hole
UW-Madison researchers key in revealing neutrinos emanating from galactic neighbor with a gigantic black hole
On Earth, billions of subatomic particles called neutrinos pass through us every second, but we never notice because they rarely interact with matter. Because of this, neutrinos can travel straight paths over vast distances unimpeded, carrying information about their cosmic origins. Although most of these aptly named "ghost" particles detected on Earth originate from the Sun or our own atmosphere, some neutrinos come from the cosmos, far beyond our galaxy.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.10.2022
Wild primate virus has pandemic potential should it jump the species barrier, shows study
Wild primate virus has pandemic potential should it jump the species barrier, shows study
In a world still reeling from COVID-19, infectious disease researchers are eager to head off the next pandemic before it has the chance to spill over from animals to humans. But the scientific reality of pandemic prevention isn't straightforward, and researchers have generally avoided making specific predictions about the potential of individual viruses to cause global disease.

Microtechnics - 21.10.2022
Wearable sensor can help unlock the potential of exosuits in real-world environments
Wearable sensor can help unlock the potential of exosuits in real-world environments
Wearing an exosuit could help people rehab from an injury or even give them extra oomph if they're carrying something heavy. But, according to University of Wisconsin-Madison and Harvard researchers, not everyone who dons a wearable robot today can immediately reap benefits from the assistance. For the first time, the research team harnessed a unique wearable sensor to directly measure force on the Achilles tendon of people who toted a heavy backpack while wearing an exosuit.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.09.2022
New study allows scientists to test therapeutics for rare disease affecting young children
New study allows scientists to test therapeutics for rare disease affecting young children
For the first time, scientists will be able to test therapeutics for a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases that affect infants and young children thanks to a new research model created by scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by genetic mutations.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2022
Decoding how bacteria talk with each other
Decoding how bacteria talk with each other
Bacteria, the smallest living organisms in the world, form communities where unified bodies of individuals live together, contribute a share of the property and share common interests. The soil around a plant's roots contains millions of organisms interacting constantly - too many busy players to study at once, despite the importance of understanding how microbes mingle.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.09.2022
Creating stem cells from minipigs offers promise for improved treatments
Creating stem cells from minipigs offers promise for improved treatments
Cells from miniature pigs are paving the way for improved stem cell therapies. A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Center researcher Wan-Ju Li offers an improved way to create a particularly valuable type of stem cell in pigs - a cell that could speed the way to treatments that restore damaged tissues for conditions from osteoarthritis to heart disease in human patients.

Life Sciences - 08.09.2022
How a small, unassuming fish helps reveal gene adaptations
How a small, unassuming fish helps reveal gene adaptations
At first blush, sticklebacks might seem a bit pedestrian. The finger-length, unassuming fish with a few small dorsal spines are a ubiquitous presence in oceans and coastal watersheds around the northern hemisphere. But these small creatures are also an excellent subject for investigating the complex dance of evolutionary adaptations.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.11.2020
New effective and safe antifungal isolated from sea squirt microbiome
Pharmacy professor Tim Bugni has led a UW-Madison effort to identify novel antimicrobials from understudied ecosystems. School of Pharmacy By combing the ocean for antimicrobials, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a new antifungal compound that efficiently targets multi-drug-resistant strains of deadly fungi without toxic side effects in mice.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2020
Gene-edited monkey embryos give researchers new way to study HIV cure
A gene that cured a man of HIV a decade ago has been successfully added to developing monkey embryos in an effort to study more potential treatments for the disease. Timothy Brown, known for years as "the Berlin Patient," received a transplant of bone marrow stem cells in 2007 to treat leukemia. The cells came from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that left the surfaces of their white blood cells without a protein called CCR5.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.11.2020
Early mutation in SARS-CoV-2 virus in Europe led to its domination worldwide
In late 2019, the SARS-CoV-2 virus emerged in China and quickly spread across the world, leading to the COVID-19 pandemic. In early 2020, that virus mutated, likely in Europe, and that mutation is now the dominant form of the virus across the globe. A new study published today in Science by a team of researchers in the U.S. and Japan shows that the mutant virus, called G614, is more easily transmitted and grows better within hosts, likely aiding its dominance.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.11.2020
’Rewiring’ metabolism in insulin-producing cells may aid Type 2 diabetes treatment
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown way that pancreatic cells decide how much insulin to secrete. It could provide a promising new target to develop drugs for boosting insulin production in people with Type 2 diabetes. In a pair of papers recently published in Cell Metabolism, scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and their colleagues point to an overlooked enzyme known as pyruvate kinase as the primary way pancreatic beta cells sense sugar levels and release the appropriate amount of insulin.
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