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Economics - 27.10.2023
From ********* to EZacces$! Your browser extension could grab your password and sensitive info
When you type a password or credit card number into a website, you expect that your sensitive data will be protected by a system designed to keep it secure. That's not always the case, according to a group of digital security researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. They found that some popular websites are vulnerable to browser extensions that can extract user data like passwords, credit card information and social security numbers from HTML code.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.10.2023
Common chemotherapy drugs don't work like doctors thought, with big implications for drug discovery
Common chemotherapy drugs don’t work like doctors thought, with big implications for drug discovery
A new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggests that chemotherapy may not be reaching its full potential, in part because researchers and doctors have long misunderstood how some of the most common cancer drugs actually ward off tumors. For decades, researchers have believed that a class of drugs called microtubule poisons treat cancerous tumors by halting mitosis, or the division of cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.10.2023
Discovery reveals fragile X syndrome begins developing even before birth
Discovery reveals fragile X syndrome begins developing even before birth
Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, may be unfolding in brain cells even before birth, despite typically going undiagnosed until age 3 or later. A new study published today in the journal Neuron by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison showed that FMRP, a protein deficient in individuals with fragile X syndrome, has a role in the function of mitochondria, part of a cell that produces energy, during prenatal development.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2023
Remnant of cell division could be responsible for spreading cancer
Remnant of cell division could be responsible for spreading cancer
Once thought to be the trash can of the cell, a little bubble of cellular stuff called the midbody remnant is actually packing working genetic material with the power to change the fate of other cells - including turning them into cancer. It's a surprise to many people, according to Ahna Skop, a University of Wisconsin­-Madison genetics professor, that when one cell divides into two, a process called mitosis, the result is not just the two daughter cells.

Astronomy / Space - Chemistry - 19.09.2023
New recipes for origin of life may point way to distant, inhabited planets
New recipes for origin of life may point way to distant, inhabited planets
Life on a faraway planet - if it's out there - might not look anything like life on Earth. But there are only so many chemical ingredients in the universe's pantry, and only so many ways to mix them. A team led by scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has exploited those limitations to write a cookbook of hundreds of chemical recipes with the potential to give rise to life.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 21.08.2023
New approach shows hydrogen can be combined with electricity to make pharmaceutical drugs
New approach shows hydrogen can be combined with electricity to make pharmaceutical drugs
The world needs greener ways to make chemicals. In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers demonstrate one potential path toward this goal by adapting hydrogen fuel cell technologies. These technologies are already used to power some electric vehicles, laptops and cell phones. "The chemical industry is a massive energy consumer, and there is a big push to decarbonize the industry," says Shannon Stahl , a professor in the UW-Madison Department of Chemistry who guided much of the research.

Health - 15.08.2023
During pandemic, proponents of ’doing your own research’ believed more COVID misinformation
As the virus that caused the COVID-19 pandemic first began to spread around the planet, it brought along a new vocabulary. Unfamiliar phrases like "flatten the curve," "COVID pod" and "essential worker" infected regular conversation. But another - "do your own research" -  was already well-known to Sedona Chinn , who studies misinformation and health communications.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2023
Cancer diagnosis and treatment could get a boost from machine learning
Cancer diagnosis and treatment could get a boost from machine learning
Thanks to machine learning algorithms, short pieces of DNA floating in the bloodstream of cancer patients can help doctors diagnose specific types of cancer and choose the most effective treatment for a patient. The new analysis technique, created by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers published recently in Annals of Oncology , is compatible with "liquid biopsy" testing equipment already approved in the United States and in use in cancer clinics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.08.2023
Researchers are using monkey poop to learn how an endangered species chooses its mates
Researchers are using monkey poop to learn how an endangered species chooses its mates
Northern muriquis, which live in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, are one of the most endangered species of monkey in the world. Choosing good mates and rearing thriving offspring are key to the species' long-term survival. To better understand what goes on in the mating lives of muriquis, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Wisconsin-Madison turned to the monkeys' poop to help gain insight into how the primates choose their mates.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.07.2023
New maps show antimicrobial resistance varies within Wisconsin neighborhoods
New maps show antimicrobial resistance varies within Wisconsin neighborhoods
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have recently revealed that the effectiveness of common antibiotics could depend on the neighborhood where you live. Here are the details. An innovative look at an old problem : Led by postdoctoral fellow Laurel Legenza , researchers at UW-Madison's School of Pharmacy and State Cartographer's Office worked with colleagues from three Wisconsin health systems to combine antibiotic resistance data from different locations throughout the state to gauge the effectiveness of a pair of common antibiotic treatments for Escherichia coli infections.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 20.07.2023
Fueled by new chemistry, algorithm mines fungi for useful molecules
Fueled by new chemistry, algorithm mines fungi for useful molecules
A newly described type of chemistry in fungi is both surprisingly common and likely to involve highly reactive enzymes, two traits that make the genes involved useful signposts pointing to a potential treasure trove of biological compounds with medical and chemical applications. It was also nearly invisible to scientists until now.

Environment - Health - 07.07.2023
Ticks may be able to spread chronic wasting disease between deer
Ticks may be able to spread chronic wasting disease between deer
A new study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison finds that ticks can harbor transmissible amounts of the protein particle that causes chronic wasting disease (CWD), implicating the parasites as possible agents in the disease's spread between deer in Wisconsin. The findings were CWD is caused by a pathogenic agent called a prion, which can pass from deer to deer through contact with things like prion-contaminated soil and infected bodily fluids such as urine, saliva, blood and feces.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 29.06.2023
IceCube shows Milky Way galaxy is a neutrino desert
IceCube shows Milky Way galaxy is a neutrino desert
The Milky Way galaxy is an awe-inspiring feature of the night sky, dominating all wavelengths of light and viewable with the naked eye as a hazy band of stars stretching from horizon to horizon. Now, for the first time, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has produced an image of the Milky Way using neutrinos - tiny, ghostlike astronomical messengers.

Physics - 29.06.2023
With sheer determination, researchers can make tough materials that bend without breaking
With sheer determination, researchers can make tough materials that bend without breaking
Shear band formation is not typically a good sign in a material - the bands often appear before a material fractures or fails. But materials science and engineering researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found that shear bands aren't always a negative; under the right conditions, they can improve the ductility, or the plasticity, of a material.

Chemistry - Computer Science - 16.06.2023
With transparent machine learning tool, engineers accelerate polymer discovery 
With transparent machine learning tool, engineers accelerate polymer discovery 
Using the power of prediction, University of Wisconsin-Madison mechanical engineers have quickly discovered several promising high-performance polymers out of a field of 8 million candidates. The aerospace, automobile and electronics industries use these polymers, known as polyimides, for a wide variety of applications because they have excellent mechanical and thermal properties - including strength, stiffness and heat resistance.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.06.2023
Bacteria with a taste for an inflammatory compound could help protect against heart disease
Bacteria with a taste for an inflammatory compound could help protect against heart disease
Some microbes in the guts of humans and mice may help control the buildup of plaque in arteries, the leading cause of cardiovascular disease, by gobbling up a group of inflammatory chemicals before they can circulate in the body. New research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and collaborators around the world identified bacteria able to break down uric acid in the low-oxygen environment of the intestines and the specific genes that enable the process.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 05.06.2023
Archaeologists uncover evidence of intentional burial, cave engravings by early human ancestor
Archaeologists uncover evidence of intentional burial, cave engravings by early human ancestor
New observations and excavations in South African caves have found that  Homo naledi , an early human ancestor, intentionally buried their dead and made crosshatch engravings in the cave walls nearby. Fossils of  Homo naledi  were first discovered in these caves 10 years ago by a team of researchers led by paleoanthropologist  Lee Berger , now a National Geographic Explorer in Residence, with key participation by John Hawks of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and other UW-Madison researchers.

Environment - 31.05.2023
Clearer picture of watershed quality helps people put dollar values on improvements
Clearer picture of watershed quality helps people put dollar values on improvements
It may be easy to argue that cleaning up a river is inherently good, but it's far harder to put a monetary value on the outcome of a clean-up - especially when each person appreciates the condition and uses and expectations for a local or distant body of water in their own way. Measuring that value is important, though, as government agencies run cost-benefit calculations and consider how to best deploy limited resources.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.05.2023
Death cap mushroom's invasion success may be linked to newly documented variability of toxin genes
Death cap mushroom’s invasion success may be linked to newly documented variability of toxin genes
It's a cold, wet day in 2015 and Anne Pringle is scouring the understory of a Northern California forest for the unassuming organism that has consumed her research for the last several years: the death cap mushroom, or Amanita phalloides. This fungus isn't the whimsical, polka-dotted toadstool of childhood cartoon nostalgia, but the fatally toxic mushroom that has invaded the North American West Coast.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.04.2023
Brain-penetrating drug candidate effective against deadly encephalitis viruses
Brain-penetrating drug candidate effective against deadly encephalitis viruses
A new antiviral compound designed and synthesized by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's School of Pharmacy is highly effective in mice against two types of devastating encephalitis viruses that are harmful to humans. UW-Madison researchers developed the compound, a quinazolinone known as BDGR-49, in collaboration with cellular virologists at the University of Louisville and researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center who performed animal efficacy studies.