Sciences

Environment - Jul 16
Environment
"The Arctic is a hotspot of climate change," explains Prof. Florian Seitz of the German Geodetic Research Institute at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). "Due to rising temperatures, the glaciers of Greenland are receding. At the same time sea ice is melting. Every year, billions of liters of meltwater are released into the ocean." The enormous volumes of fresh water released in the Arctic not only raise the sea level, they also have the potential to change the system of global ocean currents - and thus, our climate.
Life Sciences - Jul 16
Life Sciences

From now on scientists can look at how living cells function and react under various experimental conditions, in parallel and throughout a the cell's lifetime.

Environment - Jul 15
Environment

Two EPFL Master's in Environmental Engineering students have developed a novel method for recovering nitrogen from wastewater.

Pharmacology - Jul 15

The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence. The process, called microdosing, has been lauded by some, with high profile proponents in Silicon Valley.

Health - Jul 16
Health

A crucial step in the way bacteria construct their defences has been revealed by an international team, including a University of Queensland researcher.

Health - Jul 15

Ten years ago, in Marathon County, Wisconsin, 55 people were sickened by an uncommon fungal infection called blastomycosis. Thirty patients were hospitalized. Two people died. The fungus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, found naturally in wet soil and in decomposing wood throughout the Great Lakes region and the Mississippi Valley, can cause flu-like illness and in severe cases, death.

Life Sciences - Jul 15

High intensity interval training (HIIT) may be doing more than just keeping you fit and strong - it may also help prevent age-related cognitive illnesses, such as dementia. A University of Queensland study found high intensity interval exercise may be more effective than continuous exercise in increasing brain blood flow in older adults.