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Astronomy - Earth Sciences
18:00
Final two ExoMars landing sites chosen
Final two ExoMars landing sites chosen
Two ancient sites on Mars that hosted an abundance of water in the planet's early history have been recommended as the final candidates for the landing site of the 2020 ExoMars rover and surface science platform: Oxia Planum and Mawrth Vallis.
Physics/Materials Science - Business/Economics
16:00
Dominique Derome new Head of Laboratory
Dominique Derome new Head of Laboratory
On 1 April 2017, Dominique Derome will become the new Head of the Laboratory for Multiscale Studies in Building Physics.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14:00
The OCD Brain: how animal research helps us understand a devastating condition
When David Adam was just 18, a teasing comment from a university friend triggered a series of thoughts that he had contracted HIV and would die of AIDS.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
13:00
European Patent Office to grant UC a broad patent on CRISPR-Cas9
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Astronomy - Environment/Sustainable Development
13:00
Hanging with Dextre
ESA Space in Videos ESA Web-TV Watch in: DOWNLOAD MP4 (22.56 MB) SOURCE MP4 (906.11 MB) This timelapse video shows Sentinel-2B satellite, from final preparations to liftoff on a Vega launcher, flight VV09, from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana, on 7 March 2017.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Sport Sciences
12:02
Parents who play 'Pokémon GO' with kids: ‘It wasn't really about the Pokémon'
Parents who play ’Pokémon GO’ with kids: ‘It wasn’t really about the Pokémon’
Parents who regularly play "Pokémon GO” with their children report a number of side benefits from playing the mobile device-based game, including increased exercise, more time spent outdoors and opportunities for family bonding, according to new University of Washington research.
Architecture
12:00
Illinois architecture professor's book examines the biases in design of products and places
Illinois architecture professor’s book examines the biases in design of products and places
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — If you've ever had difficulty using a product or felt uncomfortable adapting to a piece of furniture or wearing certain clothing, it might not be your fault, but rather the result of poor design.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
12:00
Microalgae could play key role in relieving climate warming
Think better living through marine microalgae, as it may become crucial to mitigate atmospheric greenhouse gases, reduce carbon dioxide emissions from commercial agriculture and steady the global cli
Physics/Materials Science
11:00
Sentinel-2B timelapse
Sentinel-2B timelapse
ESA Space in Images ESA's ExoMars rover (foreground) and Russia's stationary surface science platform (background) are scheduled for launch in July 2020, arriving at Mars in March 2021.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Astronomy
11:00
Climate at your fingertips
Climate at your fingertips
Discover our planet's changing climate through the eyes of satellites with Climate from Space, a new digital book for iPad and Android tablets featuring interactive maps and video interviews with top scientists.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Law/Forensics
10:01
Where states rank on water rights transfers
Where states rank on water rights transfers
Stanford's Water in the West program ranks states in the Colorado River Basin on their use of and support for a legal tool enabling water rights holders to voluntarily transfer their water to benefit the environment.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
09:01
Harvard Launches Data Science Initiative
Cambridge, MA (March 28, 2017)?A statistician and a computer scientist have been named co-leaders of Harvard's new Data Science Initiative, the Harvard University Office of the Vice Provost for Research announced today.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
07:00
From synthetic biology to global health challenges
From synthetic biology to global health challenges
The University of Bristol is at the forefront of synthetic biology research, teaching and innovation.
Environment/Sustainable Development
28.03.2017
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
28.03.2017
Dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecosystems, researchers conclude
Dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecosystems, researchers conclude
ANN ARBOR?Scientists have known for decades that tropical places like Hawaii, with lush landscapes and vegetation, nutritionally benefit from the dust that blows from Asia. Now, a team led by University of Michigan and University of Wyoming researchers demonstrates that airborne dust can also drive the evolution of nutrient budgets in mountainous forest ecosystems.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Physics/Materials Science
28.03.2017
New nano devices could withstand extreme environments of space
Members of the Stanford XLab are creating nano-devices that can withstand the acid rains on Venus, radiation in space and the heat of car engines, improving research in these extreme environments. Professor Debbie Senesky, left, works with graduate student Caitlin Chapin on electronics that can resist extreme environments.
Administration/Government
28.03.2017
More children need access to better education and care
Australian early childhood education and care programs offer good quality care and emotional support, but more high quality teaching through play is required, according to new research from the University of Melbourne.
Architecture
28.03.2017
Tropical cyclone Debbie: UQ Experts available for comment
The following experts are available to comment on the impacts of tropical cyclone Debbie. This list will be updated.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
27.03.2017
With the demise of the Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill, what‘s next for health care'
With the demise of the Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill, what‘s next for health care’
Richard L. Kaplan , the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at Illinois, is an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and retirement issues.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
Pioneering stem cell gene therapy cures infants with bubble baby disease
Pioneering stem cell gene therapy cures infants with bubble baby disease
FINDINGS UCLA researchers have developed a stem cell gene therapy cure for babies born with adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency, a rare and life-threatening condition that can be fatal within the first year of life if left untreated. In a phase 2 clinical trial led by Dr. Donald Kohn of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, all nine babies were cured.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
Major genetic study identifies 12 new genetic variants for ovarian cancer
Major genetic study identifies 12 new genetic variants for ovarian cancer
A genetic trawl through the DNA of almost 100,000 people, including 17,000 patients with the most common type of ovarian cancer, has identified 12 new genetic variants that increase risk of developing the disease and confirmed the association of 18 of the previously published variants. Published today , the findings are the result of work by the OncoArray Consortium, a huge endeavour led by scientists in the UK, the USA and Australia.
Environment/Sustainable Development
27.03.2017
Renewable energy has robust future in much of Africa
Renewable energy has robust future in much of Africa
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Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
27.03.2017
Tiny bacterium provides window into whole ecosystems
Tiny bacterium provides window into whole ecosystems
William Blake may have seen a world in a grain of sand, but for scientists at MIT the smallest of all photosynthetic bacteria holds clues to the evolution of entire ecosystems, and perhaps even the whole biosphere. The key is a tiny bacterium called Prochlorococcus , which is the most abundant photosynthetic life form in the oceans.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
Detecting mutations could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosis
Detecting mutations could lead to earlier liver cancer diagnosis
In many parts of the world, including Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, exposure to a fungal product called aflatoxin is believed to cause up to 80 percent of liver cancer cases. This fungus is often found in corn, peanuts, and other crops that are dietary staples in those regions. MIT researchers have now developed a way to determine, by sequencing DNA of liver cells, whether those cells have been exposed to aflatoxin.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics
27.03.2017
The Economic Case for Wind and Solar Energy in Africa
The Economic Case for Wind and Solar Energy in Africa
To meet skyrocketing demand for electricity, African countries may have to triple their energy output by 2030.
Life Sciences
27.03.2017
The role of tiny RNA in genetic diversity
The role of tiny RNA in genetic diversity
All species, from zebrafish to humans, possess a genetically diverse collection of traits that allow them to adapt to changing environments. Yet scientists do not fully understand how organisms reach a state of optimal diversity - just enough variability to respond to environmental risks but not too much to function properly.
Psychology - Computer Science/Telecom
27.03.2017
Can computers one day understand emotions’ New patent paves the way
James Wang and Reginald Adams discussing a new patent that takes the next step in computer learning techniques in the hopes that computers can one day understand the complex realm of human feelings.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
27.03.2017
Enzyme structures illuminate mechanism behind bacteria’s bioremediation prowess
Contract employees with BP America load an oil containment boom onto a work boat to assist in oil recovery efforts from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: U.S. Navy Bacteria, like humans and animals, must eat. Sometimes, they consume a pollutant in the environment that humans want to get rid of, a process called bioremediation.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
27.03.2017
Keeping communities out of harm's way in a changing climate
Keeping communities out of harm’s way in a changing climate
Based on examples from around the world, researchers chart the landscape for whether and how to implement the strategy of managed retreat - relocation or abandonment of development in the face of extreme weather risks.
Administration/Government
27.03.2017
Letter regarding federal funding priorities and MIT’s budget
The following email was sent today to the MIT community by President L. Rafael Reif. To the members of the MIT community: When the White House released a sketch of its budget priorities , it was impossible to ignore the scale of its cuts to many areas of research vital to MIT's mission.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
27.03.2017
A big leap toward tinier lines
A big leap toward tinier lines
For the last few decades, microchip manufacturers have been on a quest to find ways to make the patterns of wires and components in their microchips ever smaller, in order to fit more of them onto a single chip and thus continue the relentless progress toward faster and more powerful computers. That progress has become more difficult recently, as manufacturing processes bump up against fundamental limits involving, for example, the wavelengths of the light used to create the patterns.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
27.03.2017
Cells grow more naturally in ‘spaghetti'
Cells grow more naturally in ‘spaghetti’
When stem cells are cultivated in the fibre network they enter between the fibres and develop into neurons (red) or glial cells (green). The blue structures are cell nuclei. (Picture taken with a confocal microscope) The usual way of cultivating cells is to use a flat laboratory dish of glass. However, inside a human body, the cells do not grow on a flat surface, but rather in three dimensions.
Event - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
27.03.2017
Ergonomist serves as research consultant on newest LG smartphone
Andris Freivalds, Lucas Professor in the Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, provided his team's research findings on the comfort and usability of the LG G6 at the launch of the smartphone at the Mobile World Congress 2017 in February. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Andris Freivalds, a world-renowned expert in the field of human factors and ergonomics, helped lead a team of researchers contracted by LG during the testing of its latest smartphone release.
Media - Careers/Employment
27.03.2017
Imogen Crump appointed Editor of Pursuit
Imogen Crump has been appointed Editor of Pursuit , the University of Melbourne's multi-media news website.
Earth Sciences - Business/Economics
27.03.2017
Archival photos offer research value
Archival photos offer research value
A crowdmapping project developed by EPFL and HEIG-VD gives volunteers the chance to compare the Switzerland of the 1960s with that of today through archival photos.
Medicine/Pharmacology
27.03.2017
No 'weekend admission effect' for the elderly sustaining broken hips in the NHS
No ’weekend admission effect’ for the elderly sustaining broken hips in the NHS
New research has found NHS patients admitted to hospital at the weekend with a hip fracture are at no greater risk of death compared to weekdays. In fact, the risk of death during the hospital stay was lower at the weekend than in the week. Only a delay to surgery; undergoing surgery on a Sunday, when provision for operations in many hospitals is less, being discharged from hospital on a Sunday; or out of hours were associated with an increased risk of death at 30 days.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
27.03.2017
From pigeonholes to the arrow of time: quantum physicist wins prestigious prize
From pigeonholes to the arrow of time: quantum physicist wins prestigious prize
A professor of physics from the University of Bristol's new Quantum Information Institute has been awarded the prestigious 2016 Cozzarelli Prize for a paper published in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Business/Economics - Politics
27.03.2017
Australian vulnerability to Chinese economic influence is exaggerated: ANU Policy paper
A new policy paper from The Australian National University (ANU) has found Australian vulnerability to Chinese economic influence is exaggerated, although China is increasingly using economic policy to exert political and security influence.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
27.03.2017
Drug could slow motor neuron disease
Drug could slow motor neuron disease
A drug with the potential to delay the progression of motor neuron disease (MND) could be in human trials within three years. University of Queensland researchers have shown the anti-inflammatory drug PMX205 is effective in animals with the disease, delaying the progression of symptoms and extending survival.
Earth Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
27.03.2017
Using a method from Wall Street to track slow slipping of Earth's crust
Using a method from Wall Street to track slow slipping of Earth’s crust
Stock traders have long used specialized trackers to decide when to buy or sell a stock, or when the market is beginning to make a sudden swing. A new University of Washington study finds that the same technique can be used to detect gradual movement of tectonic plates, what are called " slow slip ” earthquakes.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
27.03.2017
'Australia's Jurassic Park' the world's most diverse
’Australia’s Jurassic Park’ the world’s most diverse
An unprecedented 21 different types of dinosaur tracks have been identified on a 25-kilometre stretch of the Dampier Peninsula coastline dubbed “Australia's Jurassic Park”.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
26.03.2017
Computer Science/Telecom - Philosophy
25.03.2017
What morals do intelligent machines have and need?
What morals do intelligent machines have and need?
Sometimes it's the questions, rather than the answers, that show how the world is changing. For example, questions about the moral consequences of machines and computers becoming more intelligent.
Environment/Sustainable Development
24.03.2017
CryoSat reveals Antarctica in 3D
CryoSat reveals Antarctica in 3D
Around 250 million measurements taken by ESA's CryoSat over the last six years have been used to create a unique 3D view of Antarctica, offering a snapshot of the undulating surface of this vast ice sheet. CryoSat's radar altimeter detects tiny variations in the height of the ice across the entire continent, including on the steeper continental margins where the vast majority of ice losses occur.
Medicine/Pharmacology
24.03.2017
Runner, 80, completes L.A. Marathon three months after major heart surgery
Runner, 80, completes L.A. Marathon three months after major heart surgery
Claude Bruni has 98 marathon races under his belt, including every Los Angeles Marathon since 1986. Nothing can keep Bruni, who's 80, from running.
Mathematics
24.03.2017
Improving the outcomes of GCSE maths resits
A new study from The University of Nottingham will look at the effectiveness of a professional development programme in helping to improve the results of GCSE maths resits.
Life Sciences
24.03.2017
Mathematics
24.03.2017
A focus on quadratic equations
Oxford researchers are taking part in an international study to film the teaching of quadratic equations for secondary school pupils.
Astronomy
24.03.2017
ANU leads citizen search for new planet in Solar System
We have the potential to find a new planet in our Solar System that no human has ever seen in our two-million-year history. ANU is launching a search for a new planet in our Solar System, inviting anyone around the world with access to the Internet to help make the historic discovery. Anyone who helps find the so-called Planet 9 will work with ANU astronomers to validate the discovery through the International Astronomical Union.
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