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Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
09:30
High voltage for tomorrow's particle accelerator
High voltage for tomorrow’s particle accelerator
On behalf of CERN, researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a high-tech device for the production of extremely precise, high voltage pulses that could be used in the next generation of particle accelerators.
Careers/Employment
09:30
Swiss Labour Force Survey in 1st quarter 2017: labour supply: 1st quarter 2017: 0.6% increase in the number of employed persons. The unemployment rate based on the ILO definition settles at 5.3%
1st quarter 2017: 0.6% increase in the number of employed persons. The unemployment rate based on the ILO definition settles at 5.3% Neuchâtel, 19.05.2017 (FSO) - The number of employed persons in Switzerland rose by 0.6% between the 1st quarters of 2016 and 2017.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
09:01
‘Pregnant' Housefly Males Demonstrate the Evolution of Sex Determination
‘Pregnant’ Housefly Males Demonstrate the Evolution of Sex Determination
Sex is one of the most essential characteristics of an individual – not only for humans, but also for animals and plants.
Life Sciences
09:00
Why our brain cells may prevent us burning fat when we're dieting
Why our brain cells may prevent us burning fat when we’re dieting
A study carried out in mice may help explain why dieting can be an inefficient way to lose weight: key brain cells act as a trigger to prevent us burning calories when food is scarce.
Medicine/Pharmacology - History/Archeology
08:00
Novartis’ new analyses reinforce the potential of Ultibro Breezhaler for COPD patients historically treated with steroids
New analyses from the FLAME study suggest dual bronchodilator Ultibro Breezhaler provides similar or better efficacy versus steroid-containing therapies, regardless of blood eosinophil (a type of white blood cell)  counts   Data was published in the centenary issue of the American Thoracic Society's 'American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine'   Together with the International Primary Care Respiratory Group, Novartis is launching
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08:00
New answers for kids with inherited kidney disease
New answers for kids with inherited kidney disease
A new gene behind a rare form of inherited childhood kidney disease has been identified by a global research team. University of Queensland researchers were part of the team that made the discovery that will improve genetic testing and could provide clues for future treatments for autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).
Law/Forensics - Social Sciences
07:01
Blind academic calls for Royal Commission into abuse of people with disabilities
Blind academic calls for Royal Commission into abuse of people with disabilities
A legally blind academic from The University of Queensland has thrown his full support behind a petition demanding Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull launch an immediate Royal Commission into the abuse of disabled people.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
07:01
FDA approves Roche’s Actemra/RoActemra (tocilizumab) for giant cell arteritis
FDA approves Roche's Actemra/RoActemra (tocilizumab) for giant cell arteritis Actemra/RoActemra is the first FDA-approved treatment for adults with giant cell arteritis (GCA) FDA previously granted Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Actemra/RoActemra in GCA Sixth FDA approval for Actemra/RoActemra since its US launch in 2010 Roche today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Actemra /RoActemra (tocilizumab) ) subcutaneous injection for the treatment of GCA, a chronic and severe autoimmune condition.
Philosophy - Computer Science/Telecom
22.05.2017
Stanford professors discuss ethics involving driverless cars
Self-driving technology presents vast ethical challenges and questions. Several professors and interdisciplinary groups at Stanford who are tackling this issue  offer their perspectives on the topic.
Life Sciences
22.05.2017
CT scans reveal underground world of worms
CT images of underground soil structures, created by worms and imaged by the University of Nottingham, are being revealed in a half-term display at the Science Museum in London from 29-31 May. A video of the 3D images can be seen here. The pictures show in detail the intricate tunnel structures created by earthworms.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
22.05.2017
Star storm
Star storm
ESA Space in Images !- unsupported format in 3 http://esamultimedia.esa.int/img/2017/05/Lost-in-the-Photosphere.jpg - (11.64 MB) (15.32 MB) An abstract sketch by Aoife van Linden Tol, the rec
Environment/Sustainable Development
22.05.2017
World better off without US in global climate agreement - ANU expert
Having the US remain under the Paris Agreement would reveal the weaknesses of the agreement, prevent new opportunities from emerging, and gift greater leverage to a recalcitrant administration.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.05.2017
Readily available antibiotic could help to curb lung damage from TB
Readily available antibiotic could help to curb lung damage from TB
Imperial scientists have found how a common antibiotic could help reduce lung destruction in people with Tuberculosis (TB). TB is a leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing 1.8 million deaths in 2015 and infecting one in three people globally, with or without symptoms. Left untreated, the disease can cause massive tissue damage in the lungs, leading to a contagious cough and eventual death.
Chemistry - Earth Sciences
22.05.2017
Himalayan powerhouses: how Sherpas have evolved superhuman energy efficiency
Sherpas have evolved to become superhuman mountain climbers, extremely efficient at producing the energy to power their bodies even when oxygen is scarce, suggests new research published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) . Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy Andrew Murray The findings could help scientists develop new ways of treating hypoxia - lack of oxygen - in patients.
Astronomy - Media
22.05.2017
The race to trace TRAPPIST-1h
The race to trace TRAPPIST-1h
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) After 60 hours of non-stop work, researchers at the University of Bern being part of an international team reached their hoped-for goal: They were the first to measure the orbital period for the outermost planet of the famous TRAPPIST-1 system which made headlines worldwide.
Literature/Linguistics - Environment/Sustainable Development
22.05.2017
Healing Brexit generational divide
Cardiff University experts will consider how to heal the generational divide following the divisive EU referendum, at this year's 30 th anniversary Hay Festival.
Politics
22.05.2017
Historian’s book traces rise of mass jailing, inequality
In the 1970s, politicians - and the public - interpreted the social movements, rising crime rates and economic downtown as proof that welfare programs didn't work and certain marginalized groups were unfit for full citizenship.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
22.05.2017
Exploring underground with a colliding drone
Exploring underground with a colliding drone
ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano last weekend helped to explore the caverns under Sicily using a drone that deliberately bumped into its surroundings in order to build a map.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
22.05.2017
Interrogating proteins
Interrogating proteins
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new protein structure, and are using it to understand how protein structures are stabilised. This research will help to design small proteins and small molecules that could be the basis for future biotechnologies and medicines. A team of chemists and biochemists from the Bristol BioDesign Institute have designed a new protein structure.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
Taking a Closer Look at Genetic Switches in Cancer
Taking a Closer Look at Genetic Switches in Cancer
Many things go wrong in cells during the development of cancer. At the heart of the chaos are often genetic switches that control the production of new cells.
Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
New research aims to streamline sexual assault services
An exhibition giving voice to sexual assault survivors will be launched with new research on better integrating Victoria's sexual assault and mental health services.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
22.05.2017
Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures
Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures
A new University of Washington study shows that the textbook understanding of global chemical weathering - in which rocks are dissolved, washed down rivers and eventually end up on the ocean floor to begin the process again - does not depend on Earth's temperature in the way that geologists had believed.
Astronomy
22.05.2017
Kepler telescope spies details of TRAPPIST-1 system's outermost planet
Kepler telescope spies details of TRAPPIST-1 system’s outermost planet
A University of Washington-led international team of astronomers has used data gathered by the Kepler Space Telescope to observe and confirm details of the outermost of seven exoplanets orbiting the star TRAPPIST-1 . They confirmed that the planet, TRAPPIST-1h, orbits its star every 18.77 days, is linked in its orbital path to its siblings and is frigidly cold.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
Animal welfare and research 3Rs symposium
Animal welfare and research 3Rs symposium
The University of Bristol held its first Animal Welfare and Research 3Rs symposium last month [Thursday 27 April].
Computer Science/Telecom - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
22.05.2017
Next-gen computing: Memristor chips that see patterns over pixels
Next-gen computing: Memristor chips that see patterns over pixels
ANN ARBOR?Inspired by how mammals see, a new "memristor" computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power than today's most advanced systems.
Law/Forensics - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
Support for health care law higher when polls mention ’repeal’
With the U.S. Senate set to take up debate on a new health care bill, Cornell researchers asked a simple question. Does the American public want former President Barack Obama‘s health care law repealed and replaced' The answer is, it depends on how you ask the question. The team analyzed hundreds of national opinion polls from March 2010, when Obama signed the Affordable Care Act, through the recent presidential election.
Administration/Government
22.05.2017
Female STEM leaders more likely to back policies aiding women
For decades, higher ed administrators have talked about the need for more female professors in science, technology, engineering and mathematics departments. But what is the best way to recruit and retain those professors? On that point, men and women sometimes disagree, according to new Cornell research.
Social Sciences - Politics
22.05.2017
Political violence gets under kids’ skin’and may stay
ANN ARBOR'When children are victims of political violence, they tend to become more aggressive with members of their own peer group, and that aggression tends to linger as they age, according to a University of Michigan study.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.05.2017
Speeding up quality control for biologics
Speeding up quality control for biologics
Drugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other proteins, are being used to treat cancer, arthritis, and many other diseases. Monitoring the quality of these drugs has proven challenging, however, because protein production by living cells is much more difficult to control than the synthesis of traditional drugs.
Literature/Linguistics - History/Archeology
22.05.2017
Researchers offer opportunity to re-enact history in unique Georgian playhouse
Dr Katherine Astbury Associate Professor of French Studies in the University of Warwick's School of Modern Languages and Cultures is calling for amateur actors to take part in a theatrical melodrama on stage in the country's most complete Georgian playhouse.
Business/Economics - Careers/Employment
22.05.2017
Administration/Government - Law/Forensics
22.05.2017
Life Sciences
22.05.2017
Digital birdhouses make studying owls easier
Digital birdhouses make studying owls easier
EPFL students have developed a system that can detect when barn owls fly into and out of their nests, without disturbing the birds.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
University of Melbourne congratulates new Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science
Three University of Melbourne scientists have been elected as Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science, a rare honour, for their outstanding contributions to science.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.05.2017
Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies
Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies
Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern.
Administration/Government
22.05.2017
UQ continues to climb in Leiden Rankings
The University of Queensland's global scientific research impact is evident in the latest Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) Leiden Ranking.
Business/Economics - Social Sciences
22.05.2017
Brexit: people are angry but looking for compromise, research finds
Researchers engaged with people across the East of England and found anxiety and resentment, as well as a broad consensus that the UK should remain in the single market.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.05.2017
Black youth, teen girls, see slower decline in frequent binge drinking
ANN ARBOR?Researchers who study binge drinking in teens have good news and bad news: the good news is the overall rate of frequent binge drinking is declining'but the bad news is, that rate is not falling as quickly for all adolescents.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.05.2017
Fundamentals drive UQ's new science Fellows
Fundamentals drive UQ’s new science Fellows
The thrill of fundamental discovery is a driving force for two University of Queensland professors who have today been named as new Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.
History/Archeology
22.05.2017
War Heritage Roadshow: keeping Shepparton military history safe in the home
Families from Shepparton will learn about their own wartime history at a two-day War Heritage Roadshow that kicks off on Friday 26 May.
History/Archeology
22.05.2017
War Heritage Roadshow: keeping Wodonga military history safe in the home
Families from Wodonga will learn about their own wartime history at a two-day War Heritage Roadshow that kicks off on Sunday 28 May.
Computer Science/Telecom
19.05.2017
Emojis: How we assign meaning to these ever-popular symbols
ANN ARBOR'Why is more popular than or , when all three express happiness? Why am I less likely to ask you to the baby so that I can enjoy a yet more likely to use or to express my appreciation when yo
Medicine/Pharmacology
19.05.2017
Opinion: Maintaining the same weight as you age may prevent diabetes - even if you're overweight to begin with
Opinion: Maintaining the same weight as you age may prevent diabetes - even if you’re overweight to begin with
Dr Adina Feldman, writing for The Conversation, looks at how diabetes can be prevented even in people who are moderately overweight.
Earth Sciences
19.05.2017
Soil temperatures rising across Illinois
After a cool beginning of the month, soil temperatures are rising throughout the state in mid-May, according to Jennie Atkins, the Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.
Arts and Design - History/Archeology
19.05.2017
Saving a renaissance masterpiece: Fitzwilliam Museum wins award for decade-long restoration
Saving a renaissance masterpiece: Fitzwilliam Museum wins award for decade-long restoration
A ten-year research and restoration project to save one of the Fitzwilliam Museum's Renaissance masterpieces was rewarded with a major national accolade this week.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.05.2017
Researchers design moisture-responsive workout suit
Researchers design moisture-responsive workout suit
A team of MIT researchers has designed a breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete's body heat and sweat.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
19.05.2017
Hothouse climates of the past – lessons for the future
Hothouse climates of the past – lessons for the future
Some of the world's leading climate change scientists will be in Bristol next week to discuss extreme warm climates throughout the history of the earth and how they help us understand the future of our planet.
Chemistry - Business/Economics
19.05.2017
Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass
UW?Madison engineers, from left, David Martin Alonso, James Dumesic and Ali Hussain Motagamwala, examine a vial of furfural, one of a group of valuable products the researchers can now create as part of the biofuel refining process. Stephanie Precourt/UW-Madison Engineering Technologies for converting non-edible biomass into chemicals and fuels traditionally made from petroleum exist aplenty.
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