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Results 51 - 100 of 2884.

Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
15.02.2018
Rapid radiation therapy minimizes treatment time, improves quality of life
Faster isn't always better, but in the case of radiation therapy for some cancers, accelerating radiation courses can help patients get on the road to recovery sooner.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Cuttlefish have surprising control of skin spikes
A Marine Biological Laboratory study examines the neural and muscular mechanisms that underlie the cuttlefish's ability to erect papillae as a camouflage tactic.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
15.02.2018
Chinese New Year: Why the Year of the Dog will be a great year for research
China celebrates Lunar New Year today and it has been a momentous twelve months for research and innovation.
Astronomy
15.02.2018
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
15.02.2018
Improving Health of Children in Nigeria
Improving Health of Children in Nigeria
To improve diagnosis and treatment of children under five, Swiss TPH together with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) developed the electronic decision support tool ALMANACH.
Physics/Materials Science - Business/Economics
15.02.2018
Six young faculty members named Sloan Research Fellows
Six young faculty members named Sloan Research Fellows
Six assistant professors from the fields of computer science, economics, neuroscience and physics have been named 2018 Sloan Research Fellows, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation announced today.
Astronomy
15.02.2018
Asteroid Day takes off
Our Signatories Over 200 astronauts, scientists, Nobel Laureates, business leaders and artists signed the 100X Asteroid Declaration.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.02.2018
Scientists receive $7.7 million grant to study HIV recurrence
Scientists receive $7.7 million grant to study HIV recurrence
The virus that causes AIDS is known to hide in certain rare cells. When people with HIV stop taking their medications, the virus can re-emerge and multiply, or “rebound,” from those hiding places.
Life Sciences
15.02.2018
Mental rehearsal might prepare our minds for action
Mentally running through a routine improves performance, but how that works isn't clear. Now, a new tool - brain-machine interface - suggests the answer lies in how our brains prepare for action. Somewhere right now in Pyeongchang, South Korea, an Olympic skier is thinking through the twists and spins she'll make in the aerial competition, a speed skater is visualizing how he'll sneak past a competitor on the inside line, and a curler is imagining the perfect sweep.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
15.02.2018
System draws power from daily temperature swings
System draws power from daily temperature swings
Thermoelectric devices, which can generate power when one side of the device is a different temperature from the other, have been the subject of much research in recent years.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.02.2018
Aksoy Labs combats the tsetse fly to protect Africa from sleeping sickness
Nearly everyone has been pestered by a housefly - a dilemma easily solved with the quick deployment of a flyswatter.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Blood thinners may raise stroke risk in over-65s with kidney disease
Blood thinners may raise stroke risk in over-65s with kidney disease
People over 65 years old may be increasing their stroke risk by taking anticoagulants for an irregular heartbeat if they also have chronic kidney disease, finds a new study led by UCL, St George's, University of London and the University of Surrey. Based on their findings, published today in the BMJ , the researchers warn that doctors should be more cautious about prescribing anticoagulants, also known as blood thinners, in this population until more studies can clarify the consequences of doing so.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
15.02.2018
Profitable for both sides
The young company Swiss Hydrogen is located in Fribourg. Here work is under way on competitive high-performance fuel cells that could be used in environmentally friendly vehicles or deployed as stationary power generators.
Astronomy - Innovation/Technology
15.02.2018
Astronomy - Media
15.02.2018
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
15.02.2018
A test of the uterine lining improves chances of a successful pregnancy
A Test of the Uterine Lining Improves Chances of Success It takes a healthy embryo and a healthy mother to nurture the microscopic meeting of a sperm and an egg through nine months of development before a baby can be born. Even as four million babies are born in the United States every year, about 6 percent of married women of reproductive age in the United States cannot become pregnant after a year of trying.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Computer Science/Telecom
15.02.2018
Maximizing the environmental benefits of autonomous vehicles
Maximizing the environmental benefits of autonomous vehicles
ANN ARBOR-The added weight, electricity demand and aerodynamic drag of the sensors and computers used in autonomous vehicles are significant contributors to their lifetime energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study. However, when savings from the driving efficiencies associated with self-driving vehicles are factored into the equation, the net result is a reduction in lifetime energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions of up to 9 percent compared to the conventional vehicles examined in the University of Michigan-led study.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
UofG Scientists awarded £4.5m funding grant from Cancer Research UK
University of Glasgow scientists are set to receive a major grant for pioneering research into cancer. Cancer Research UK is planning to invest nearly £4.5 million over the next five years in ground-breaking work at the Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) in Glasgow. The grant will allow doctors and scientists to continue researching and testing better and kinder treatments for patients.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Experts call to prevent injuries at indoor trampoline parks
Injury experts are urgently calling for a mandatory Australian Standard to prevent the rise of serious injuries linked to the booming use of indoor trampoline parks.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.02.2018
Not being aware of memory problems predicts onset of Alzheimer’s disease
Doctors who work with individuals at risk of developing dementia have long suspected that patients who do not realize they experience memory problems are at greater risk of seeing their condition wor
Sport Sciences - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
15.02.2018
3Q: T.L. Taylor on diversity in e-sports
3Q: T.L. Taylor on diversity in e-sports
Imagine a sports arena full of cheering fans. Are you picturing basketball, or perhaps hockey? Actually, that image also applies to high-level e-sports (short for electronic sports), the competitions where fans watch people playing popular video games.
Social Sciences - Sport Sciences
14.02.2018
Diversity only marginally boosts accuracy of group’s predictions
ANN ARBOR-Diversity for boards, juries and other influential decision-making teams can help ensure that the interests of a diverse population are fairly represented and addressed.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.02.2018
For one early adopter, CAR'T therapy means 18 months cancer-free and counting
For one early adopter, CAR’T therapy means 18 months cancer-free and counting
UCLA Health becomes one of few centers in U.S. to offer FDA-approved treatment outside clinical trials Wayne Lewis For as long as he can remember, Josh Feldman has eagerly embraced the latest technology.
Environment/Sustainable Development
14.02.2018
Risk of extreme weather events higher if Paris Agreement goals aren’t met
The Paris Agreement has aspirational goals of limiting temperature rise that won't be met by current commitments.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
14.02.2018
YSPH-led breastfeeding advocacy project to expand globally
Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly (BBF): A Guide to Global Scale-Up, developed to increase breastfeeding rates globally is expanding to include England, Scotland, Wales, Germany, Myanmar and Samoa.
Life Sciences - Art and Design
14.02.2018
UCL’s Jeremy Bentham joins exhibition in New York
UCL has mounted a meticulously-planned operation to enable its spiritual forebear Jeremy Bentham to achieve in death what he always wanted to do in life: visit America.
Physics/Materials Science
14.02.2018
Environment/Sustainable Development
14.02.2018
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
14.02.2018
Life Sciences - Psychology
14.02.2018
Reality check
Reality check
Reality check Ever had a hallucination? Did you know that you're having one right now? Our grip on reality is, according to neuroscientists, much less tangible than we believe.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.02.2018
How big pharma could be influencing your healthcare
Call to rid professional education of commercial sponsorship, as analysis of industry-funded events suggests a link between pharmaceutical marketing and the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of certain conditions.
Psychology
13.02.2018
5 Science-Based Tips for Building Love That Lasts
5 Science-Based Tips for Building Love That Lasts
What do Aristotle and the field of positive psychology have to say about modern-day relationships' According to a new book from husband-and-wife team James Pawelski , a philosopher and professor of p
Astronomy - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.02.2018
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Innovation/Technology
13.02.2018
Berkeley Lab Report Calls for Industry Attention to Ensuring Grid Reliability
In light of changes in how electricity is being both generated and consumed, the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has written a new report analyzing challenges facing the nation's electric grid and making recommendations for ensuring continued reliability.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
13.02.2018
Sandoz announces US FDA approval and launch of Glatopa 40 mg/mL three times-a-week generic option for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis
Sandoz announces US FDA approval and launch of Glatopa 40 mg/mL three times-a-week generic option for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis Glatopa 40 mg/mL is a fully substitutable, AP-rated generic
Sport Sciences
13.02.2018
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
13.02.2018
Female Veterans Share Personal Stories of 'Coming Home'
Female Veterans Share Personal Stories of ’Coming Home’
Catherine Revak , a first-year doctoral student in clinical social work at the University of Pennsylvania, was seated comfortably toward the back of the room at the Penn Bookstore.
Art and Design
13.02.2018
Questions to make you fall in love, again
Questions to make you fall in love, again
If you could change one thing about the way you were raised, what would it be? Of all the people in your family, whose death would you find most disturbing, and why? These are among the 36 questions
Mathematics - Computer Science/Telecom
13.02.2018
Neural networks everywhere
Neural networks everywhere
Most recent advances in artificial-intelligence systems such as speechor face-recognition programs have come courtesy of neural networks, densely interconnected meshes of simple information processors that learn to perform tasks by analyzing huge sets of training data. But neural nets are large, and their computations are energy intensive, so they're not very practical for handheld devices.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.02.2018
History/Archeology - Social Sciences
12.02.2018
Neubauer Collegium faculty projects explore themes across academic fields
Detail from Untitled (New York, 2014) by Mark Strand-a collage that was included in the Neubauer Collegium Spring 2017 gallery exhibition.
Life Sciences
12.02.2018
Visual cues amplify sound
Visual cues amplify sound
Looking at someone's lips is good for listening in noisy environments because it helps our brains amplify the sounds we're hearing in time with what we're seeing, finds a new UCL-led study.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics
12.02.2018
Corporate sustainability often less than meets the eye
The first large-scale analysis of corporate practices for sourcing sustainable materials shows that many companies address sustainability at some level, but most deal with only one or a subset of materials within a small portion of their supply chain.
Innovation/Technology - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
12.02.2018
New method for waking up devices
A device that's turned off doesn't suck battery life, but it also doesn't work. Now a low-power system that's always on the alert can turn devices on when they are needed, saving energy in the networked internet of things. As smartphone users know all too well, a sleeping device can still suck the life out of a battery.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
12.02.2018
Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus
Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus
For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras. But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require lenses made of a new array of materials.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.02.2018
People with learning disabilities have a greater number of illnesses than previously understood
People with learning disabilities are suffering from a far greater number of illnesses than had been previously understood, adding to concerns that life-threatening conditions are being routinely miss
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
12.02.2018
Solving the Dark Energy Mystery: A New Assignment for a 45-Year-Old Telescope
Solving the Dark Energy Mystery: A New Assignment for a 45-Year-Old Telescope
Forty-five years ago this month, a telescope tucked inside a 14-story, 500-ton dome atop a mile-high peak in Arizona took in the night sky for the first time and recorded its observations in glass photographic plates. Today, the dome closes on the previous science chapters of the 4-meter Nicholas U. Mayall Telescope so that it can prepare for its new role in creating the largest 3-D map of the universe.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Psychology
12.02.2018
Sibling bullying makes psychotic disorders three times more likely
People who were bullied by siblings during childhood are up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early adulthood, according to new research by the University of Warwick.