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Environment/Sustainable Development - Administration/Government
23.02.2018
Orangutans in Sabah have a better future
100,000 orangutans have disappeared in Borneo in the last 16 years, finds a new study with contribution from the Danau Girang Field Centre.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
23.02.2018
Inspired by nature: Design for new electrode could boost supercapacitors' performance
Inspired by nature: Design for new electrode could boost supercapacitors’ performance
Engineers from UCLA, 4 other universities produce nanoscale device that mimics the structure of tree branches Matthew Chin Mechanical engineers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and four other institutions have designed a super-efficient and long-lasting electrode for supercapacitors.
Physics/Materials Science - Innovation/Technology
23.02.2018
Researchers combine metalens with an artificial muscle
Inspired by the human eye, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an adaptive metalens, that is essentially a flat, electronically controlled artificial eye. The adaptive metalens simultaneously controls for three of the major contributors to blurry images: focus, astigmatism, and image shift.
Life Sciences - Administration/Government
23.02.2018
Step forward in tackling crop pest - a sunscreen for pesticides
Step forward in tackling crop pest - a sunscreen for pesticides
Scientists have taken a step forward in their efforts to tackle serious crop threats. Insect pests consume around a third of all the crops we grow, sometimes threatening food security.
Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2018
New link between gut bacteria and obesity
New link between gut bacteria and obesity
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new link between gut bacteria and obesity. They found that certain amino acids in our blood can be connected to both obesity and the composition of the gut microbiome. We know less about the significance of our gut bacteria than what many books and magazines on the subject seem to suggest.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
23.02.2018
Award to fund U-M food systems anemia research in Africa
Award to fund U-M food systems anemia research in Africa
ANN ARBOR-The University of Michigan School of Public Health has received a $1.3 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study the impact of the fish processing industry on persistent anemia among adolescent girls and women in Ghana.
Environment/Sustainable Development
23.02.2018
Computer Science/Telecom - Innovation/Technology
23.02.2018
In tech we trust?
In tech we trust?
Fairness, trust and transparency are qualities we usually associate with organisations or individuals.
Business/Economics - Careers/Employment
23.02.2018
Data glasses make warehouse logistics work easier for the deaf
Data glasses make warehouse logistics work easier for the deaf
Research news Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a visual communication system for hearing-impaired employees in logistics.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
23.02.2018
Pedagogy/Education Science
23.02.2018
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2018
Medicine/Pharmacology - Law/Forensics
23.02.2018
Warning over claims that medical cannabis cuts opioid use
Claims that medical cannabis use has reduced opioid overdose deaths in the United States have been challenged by a University of Queensland drug abuse expert.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics
22.02.2018
What could a U.S. climate policy look like?
Stanford economics Professor Larry Goulder discusses the tradeoffs of federal climate policy options and finds ways to enhance both societal health and economic benefits. New analysis by economist Larry Goulder finds a carbon tax is a more cost-effective option to achieve reduced emissions than conventional forms of regulation.
Astronomy - Innovation/Technology
22.02.2018
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
22.02.2018
The myth of what’s driving the opioid crisis
The Friday Cover The Friday Cover is POLITICO Magazine's email of the week's best, delivered to your inbox every Friday morning.
Innovation/Technology - Business/Economics
22.02.2018
Mission-oriented innovation could stimulate growth while tackling plastic in seas, dirty cities and dementia
Mission-oriented innovation could stimulate growth while tackling plastic in seas, dirty cities and dementia
A plastic-free ocean, 100 carbon neutral cities by 2030 and cutting dementia by 50% are highlighted as examples of missions that could drive innovation and economic growth in a report for the EU by a top UCL professor.
Physics/Materials Science
22.02.2018
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
22.02.2018
Swarm trio becomes a quartet
Swarm trio becomes a quartet
With the aim of making the best possible use of existing satellites, ESA and Canada have made a deal that turns Swarm into a four-satellite mission to shed even more light on space weather and features such as the aurora borealis.
Astronomy - Environment/Sustainable Development
22.02.2018
Tracking fishing from space
Satellite data from thousands of high seas fishing vessels over four years illuminate global fishing's scope and pattern - down to single vessels and hourly activity - and hold promise for improving ocean management across the planet.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.02.2018
Forecasting antibiotic resistance with a ’weather map’ of local data
The researchers, including Comparative Health Systems Global Pharmacy Fellow Laurel Legenza, are developing a visual display of antibiotic resistance data across Wisconsin.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Philosophy
22.02.2018
New curriculum prioritizes tribal sovereignty, cultural respect in scientific research of American Indian, Alaska Native communities
New curriculum prioritizes tribal sovereignty, cultural respect in scientific research of American Indian, Alaska Native communities
When scientists have conducted research in Native American communities, the process and the results have sometimes been controversial. There have been a few well-known cases, such as the 1979 Barrow Alcohol Study , in which researchers examined substance use in the tiny Arctic Circle town and issued findings to the press, before briefing the local community.
Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering - Business/Economics
22.02.2018
Reducing failed deliveries, truck parking time could improve downtown Seattle congestion, new report finds
Reducing failed deliveries, truck parking time could improve downtown Seattle congestion, new report finds
In Amazon's hometown, people turn to their computers to order everything from groceries to last-minute birthday presents to the odd toothbrush or medication forgotten from the store. If online shopping continues to grow at its current rate, there may be twice as many trucks delivering packages in Seattle's city center within five years, a new report projects - and double the number of trucks looking for a parking space.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
22.02.2018
Carbon monoxide detection in the body could lead to rapid disease diagnostics
A quick and reliable way to detect levels of carbon monoxide in the body could allow clinicians to diagnose disease. Carbon monoxide is normally considered in terms of the amount of damage it can cause us, but a team of scientists at Imperial College London and the Polytechnic University of Valencia have been looking at the other biological roles it can play.
Astronomy
22.02.2018
Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation to Finance New Center for Research into Long-Term Effects of Breastfeeding
What are the reasons a mother does or does not breastfeed? What effect does the decision have on the child, the mother, and society? Although there is a lot of scientific evidence for the health benef
Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
Treatment with Novartis’ Ultibro Breezhaler improved cardiac function in COPD patients with lung hyperinflation
Ultibro Breezhaler provided significant improvements in cardiac and lung function in COPD patients with lung hyperinflation, compared to placebo     CLAIM is the first study to investigate the effect of dual bronchodilation on cardiac function   Data published in the Lancet Respiratory Medicine Basel, February 22, 2018 - Novartis today announced the publication of the CLAIM * study in the Lancet Respiratory Medicine, which demonstrated that trea
Careers/Employment - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
5 career barriers and how to break through them
Gender barriers in the workplace can be hard to break. University of Sydney academics offer tips to tackle career obstacles this International Women's Day.
Veterinary Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
Australians support a whip ban in horse racing: poll
An overwhelming majority of Australians favour a whip ban - and most horseracing enthusiasts would not walk away - providing a strong incentive to stop the spectacle of whipping, which science shows does not increase wins. Norway adopted whip-free racing in 1982, not because whipping was considered a bad look for the racing industry back then, but because national legislation included whipping as a form of cruelty Three-quarters of Australians quizzed in a poll said they do not support the whipping of horses in racing, a study published today in PLOS ONE shows.
Medicine/Pharmacology
22.02.2018
Global scale of TB in young people revealed for first time
An estimated 1.8 million young people around the world develop tuberculosis each year, according to a new report.
Religions - History/Archeology
22.02.2018
Billy Graham’s missed opportunities
As one of world Christianity's most admired leaders, the Rev. Billy Graham, who died on Wednesday at 99, had extraordinary opportunities to affect the character of the Christian religion and to pronounce on its implications for personal conduct.
Computer Science/Telecom - Business/Economics
22.02.2018
Private browsing gets more private
Private browsing gets more private
Today, most web browsers have private-browsing modes, in which they temporarily desist from recording the user's browsing history.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
22.02.2018
Bolting birds help reveal dinosaur gait
Research into how modern birds run and walk is taking an international team of palaeontologists and biomechanics experts a step closer to accurately reconstructing the way extinct dinosaurs moved.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Agronomy/Food Science
22.02.2018
Securing a child’s future needs to start during parents’ teen years
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new paper.  The article in the latest edition of Nature argues that tackling health problems including obesity, mental health, poor nutrition and substance abuse in young people before they become parents is essential for the best possible start to life for their future children.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences
21.02.2018
Rainfall’s natural variation hides climate change signal
New research from The Australian National University (ANU) and ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science suggests natural rainfall variation is so great that it could take a human lifetime for significant climate signals to appear in regional or global rainfall measures.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.02.2018
Ebola vaccine inches toward human clinical trials
A whole-virus vaccine to confront Ebola, the rare but often fatal hemorrhagic disease that periodically erupts in sub-Saharan Africa, may soon be one step closer to the clinic.
Literature/Linguistics - History/Archeology
21.02.2018
Undergraduates perform an adaptation of Life Is a Dream with a new ending
Under the guest direction of Tony Award-winner Dominique Serrand, Stanford cast and crew explore age-old themes from a 17th-century Spanish play while incorporating modern questions of gender and ambiguity.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
21.02.2018
Amateur astronomer captures rare first light from massive exploding star
Amateur astronomer captures rare first light from massive exploding star
Thanks to lucky snapshots taken by an amateur astronomer in Argentina, scientists have obtained their first view of the initial burst of light from the explosion of a massive star.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.02.2018
PremieBreathe gives premature babies a better chance
Despite having the medical training to treat the breathing problems of prematurely born babies, doctors in places with fewer resources are continually frustrated by the lack of technology to do so properly.
Astronomy - Innovation/Technology
21.02.2018
Waterbeds simulate weightlessness to help Skinsuits combat back pain in space
Waterbeds simulate weightlessness to help Skinsuits combat back pain in space
Astronauts tend to become taller in weightlessness - causing back pain and making it difficult to fit into spacesuits.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
21.02.2018
Generous donation benefits Yale psychosis treatment program
No one gave Marc Rabinowitz and his wife, Elizabeth, a guide book when a close family member was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 2011.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Astronomy
21.02.2018
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics
21.02.2018
Learning from the best in the gig economy
ANN ARBOR-As anyone who's worked in the gig economy knows, it can feel awfully lonely out there.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
21.02.2018
Snake-inspired robot uses kirigami to move
Who needs legs' With their sleek bodies, snakes can slither up to 14 miles-per-hour, squeeze into tight space, scale trees and swim. How do they do it? It's all in the scales. As a snake moves, its scales grip the ground and propel the body forward - similar to how crampons help hikers establish footholds in slippery ice.
Life Sciences
21.02.2018
Getting sleepy? Fruit flies constantly tune into environmental temperature to time sleep
ANN ARBOR-Humans and fruit flies may have not shared a common ancestor for hundreds of millions of years, but the neurons that govern our circadian clocks are strikingly similar.
Astronomy - Earth Sciences
21.02.2018
Surfing complete
Surfing complete
Slowed by skimming through the very top of the upper atmosphere, ESA's ExoMars has lowered itself into a planet-hugging orbit and is about ready to begin sniffing the Red Planet for methane. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter arrived at Mars in October 2016 to investigate the potentially biological or geological origin of trace gases in the atmosphere.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.02.2018
New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research
New Open-access Data Resource Aims to Bolster Collaboration in Global Infectious Disease Research
Population-based epidemiological studies provide new opportunities for innovation and collaboration among researchers addressing pressing global-health concerns.
Astronomy
21.02.2018
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.02.2018
’Chameleon’ ocean bacteria can shift their colours
Bacteria that are crucial to ocean life can shift their colour like chameleons to match different coloured light across the world's seas - international research involving the University of Warwick h
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