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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08:00
Novartis real-world data at AAN confirms benefit of Gilenya on four key measures of disease activity in relapsing MS
Over 16 months, more than 75% of patients on Gilenya had either no relapses, no new or enlarged MRI lesions or no disability progression; around 58% showed brain shrinkage levels broadly within the range expected for people without MS   Approximately 60% of patients achieved NEDA-3 (no relapses, no MRI lesions and no disability progression combined) and 38% achieved NEDA-4 (NEDA-3 plus no brain shrinkage), further supporting findings from clinic
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.04.2017
The eyes have it for new camera system inspired by animal vision
Scientists have taken inspiration from how animals' eyes work to create a new way for computer-controlled cameras to ‘see'.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.04.2017
NIH Awards Team $7 Million for Autism Genetics Research
A research team, including scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, has received a $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) to extend the work of the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC) through 2022. The work will expand the ASC's sample to include more than 50,000 families.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.04.2017
Sandoz proposed biosimilars rituximab and etanercept recommended for approval in Europe*
Sandoz receives positive CHMP opinions for biosimilars rituximab and etanercept to treat immunological diseases.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.04.2017
US Defense supports UQ breast cancer research
US Defense supports UQ breast cancer research
The US Department of Defense (DoD) has committed more than A$1.3 million from its Breast Cancer Research Program to a Queensland study tackling the spread of tumours to the brain. The University of Queensland will conduct the three-year project, the only project outside North America awarded funding under the DoD's Breast Cancer Breakthrough Scheme (Award #W81XWH-17-1-0064 & 17-1-0065).
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
How gut bacteria change cancer drug activity
How gut bacteria change cancer drug activity
The activity of cancer drugs changes depending on the types of microbes living in the gut, according to a UCL-led study into how nematode worms and their microbes process drugs and nutrients. The discovery highlights the potential benefit of manipulating gut bacteria and diet to improve cancer treatment and the value of understanding why the effectiveness of drugs varies between individuals.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
20.04.2017
Brain's
Brain’s "hand area" used by other body parts in people born with one hand
The area of the brain used to control the hand gets used instead to support the lips, feet or arms of people who were born with only one hand, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. ‘Our brains have evolved over millions of years so that a specific area of the brain becomes specialised in controlling hand function.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
What exactly does ‘healthy' mean when it comes to food?
What exactly does ‘healthy’ mean when it comes to food?
Anyone who's ever walked into a grocery store has seen the various health claims on food items calling certain products "healthy.
Life Sciences
20.04.2017
What makes a vegetarian? It’s not what’s on the plate
They say you are what you eat. But that may not be true for vegetarians. A Cornell undergraduate and his academic adviser have come up with a new way to think about vegetarians.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
Imperial wins bid to host new UK Dementia Research Institute centre
Imperial wins bid to host new UK Dementia Research Institute centre
A new multidisciplinary UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI) centre is to open at Imperial College London later this year.
Agronomy/Food Science - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
Hemp Summit looks at New York’s next big cash crop
New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, second from right, speaks at the Industrial Hemp Summit on April 18 at Cornell.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
Protection for the gut barrier
Protection for the gut barrier
Research news Stem cell transplants can save lives, for example in patients with leukemia. However, these treatments are not free of risks.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.04.2017
£13m dementia research centre
Cardiff University will be playing a major role in the UK's biggest dementia research initiative with the launch of a £13m dementia research centre.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.04.2017
Action Required: Invasive Fungus Is Killing European Salamanders
The situation is alarming: The invasive Asian fungus has recently led to mass mortality of fire salamanders in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany.
Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
19.04.2017
High-speed images capture archer fish's rocket-like launch
High-speed images capture archer fish’s rocket-like launch
The archer fish is arguably the ninja of the aquatic world, known for its stealth-like, arrow-straight aim while shooting down unsuspecting prey.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.04.2017
Natural experiment, dogged investigation, yield clue to devastating neurological disease
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 4/19/17 His new study, now online in the journal Annals of Neurology, is more than the conclusion of a personal and intellectual odyssey, however. Duncan has just shown that the rat abnormality closely resembles a rare human mutation that results in severe neurologic dysfunction.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.04.2017
CRT Pioneer Fund, Cancer Research UK and NCI Collaborate to boost research against the 'undruggable' RAS
CRT Pioneer Fund, Cancer Research UK and NCI Collaborate to boost research against the ’undruggable’ RAS
Cancer Research UK and the Cancer Research Technology Pioneer Fund (CPF)* have committed £2.5 million in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the US to tackle one of the toughest challenges in cancer that has thwarted researchers for more than 30 years.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
19.04.2017
Bees face heavy pesticide peril from drawn-out sources
Honeybees - employed to pollinate crops during the blooming season - encounter danger due to lingering and wandering pesticides, according to an analysis of the bee's own food.
Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
19.04.2017
Brain Drain - How Europe is fighting back
Brain Drain - How Europe is fighting back
Campus news Find out more about exciting research and innovation in Europe - with ‘Technologist', produced by the EuroTech Universities Alliance.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
19.04.2017
Saving leopards from human threats
Saving leopards from human threats
Leopard populations in part of South Africa are decreasing in greater numbers and at a greater speed than expected, due in large part to illegal killing by humans according to new findings. A research team led by Dr Samual Williams , an Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Anthropology , conducted a long-term study of the leopard population in the Soutpansberg Mountains in South Africa and found that leopard density (the number of leopards per 100 km 2 ) had decreased by 44% between 2012 and 2016 and by 66% since 2008.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.04.2017
Roche to present new data at AAN reinforcing efficacy and safety of newly FDA-approved OCREVUS? (ocrelizumab) in two types of multiple sclerosis
Roche to present new data at AAN reinforcing efficacy and safety of newly FDA-approved OCREVUS? (ocrelizumab) in two types of multiple sclerosis Data presentations will include platform sessions and
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.04.2017
FDA grants Roche’s TECENTRIQ (atezolizumab) accelerated approval as initial treatment for certain people with advanced bladder cancer
FDA grants Roche's TECENTRIQ (atezolizumab) accelerated approval as initial treatment for certain people with advanced bladder cancer First and only cancer immunotherapy approved in advanced bladder
Life Sciences - Agronomy/Food Science
18.04.2017
New project for enhanced salt tolerance in tomato plants: BMBF supports German-Brazilian research project with around ’1.1 million
Tomato crops need a plentiful supply of water to thrive, which is why these plants require irrigation in many cases.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
18.04.2017
Imperial branches out to develop synthetic biology in East Africa
Imperial branches out to develop synthetic biology in East Africa
Synthetic biology experts from Imperial College London headed to East Africa to help identify where the field could have a life-changing impact.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.04.2017
Chaining up diarrhoea pathogens
Chaining up diarrhoea pathogens
Researchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance. Vaccinations are known to protect against pathogens such as bacteria or viruses.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.04.2017
Novartis CAR-T cell therapy CTL019 receives FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation for treatment of adult patients with r/r DLBCL
Designation prioritizes investigational CTL019 (tisagenlecleucel) as a potential treatment for adult patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)   R/r DLBCL, an aggressive cancer with limited options, is the second indication for CTL019 to receive Breakthrough Therapy designation   Advances in CTL019 result from collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania; regulatory submissions for r/r DLBCL are expected
Philosophy - Life Sciences
17.04.2017
Doris lecturer discusses recipe for moral improvement
On April 12, what would have been professor emeritus of human development John L. Doris? 94th birthday, his son, John M. Doris, delivered the 10th annual John L. Doris Memorial Lecture hosted by the College of Human Ecology's Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research.
Computer Science/Telecom - Life Sciences
14.04.2017
Explained: Neural networks
Explained: Neural networks
In the past 10 years, the best-performing artificial-intelligence systems - such as the speech recognizers on smartphones or Google's latest automatic translator - have resulted from a technique called ‘deep learning.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
14.04.2017
Protein’s flexibility helps its response to diverse pollutants
How some industrial pollutants or abnormal levels of cellular metabolites contribute to diverse human diseases is now more clearly understood, based on a new study from the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) and the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research. Initially discovered for its cellular role in responding to the pollutant TCDD, a byproduct of fossil fuel or industrial waste burning, decades of research has identified numerous other chemicals to which AHR responds.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
13.04.2017
Simulation shows how transporter proteins do their work in cells
Stanford researchers have simulated how a transporter protein moves a sugar molecule through a cell membrane, a phenomenon with relevance to drug delivery. (Image credit: istock/NNehring, with Stefani Billings) Cells must continually pass molecules in and out to sustain life. Computer scientists and molecular physiologists have developed a computer algorithm to capture how these crucial proteins work.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.04.2017
The dangers of being a saber-toothed cat in Los Angeles 12,000 years ago
The dangers of being a saber-toothed cat in Los Angeles 12,000 years ago
Studying the animals' bones, UCLA biologists found injuries to shoulders and backs after likely attacks on large prey Stuart Wolpert Saber-toothed cats that roamed Los Angeles 12,000 years ago had many injuries to their shoulders and backbones that likely occurred when they killed large herbivore prey such as bison and horses, UCLA biologists report Ecology and Evolution.
Life Sciences
13.04.2017
Conference will explore bodies and conversion
‘Transforming Bodies,' an interdisciplinary conference April 21-22, will explore the centrality of bodies to concepts and practices of conversion in the early modern world.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.04.2017
Eye expressions offer a glimpse into the evolution of emotion
Subjects in Adam Anderson's study linked wide-open eyes, left, with emotions related to sensitivity, like fear and awe. Narrowed eyes, right, were linked to emotions such as disgust and suspicion. New research by Adam Anderson , professor of human development at Cornell's College of Human Ecology, reveals why the eyes offer a window into the soul.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.04.2017
Chocolate gets all-clear from dermatologist; Seeking participants for acne treatment trial
As Easter looms, University of Melbourne researchers have good news on two fronts: eating chocolate does not cause pimples; and they're calling for participants for a trial of a new treatment for moderate or severe acne.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
13.04.2017
UC appeals U.S. patent board decision on CRISPR-Cas9
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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.04.2017
Astronomy - Life Sciences
12.04.2017
Life on Earth is used to gravity - so what happens to our cells and tissues in space?
Life on Earth is used to gravity - so what happens to our cells and tissues in space?
Andy Tay is a UCLA Ph.D. student in bioengineering. This piece appeared on the Conversation. There's one force whose effects are so deeply entrenched in our everyday lives that we probably don't think much about it at all: gravity. Gravity is the force that causes attraction between masses. It's why when you drop a pen, it falls to the ground.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.04.2017
MicroRNA may reduce stroke risk
MicroRNA may reduce stroke risk
Research news The molecule microRNA-210 stabilises deposits in the carotid artery and can prevent them from tearing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.04.2017
Why treating animals may be important in fighting resurgent tropical disease
Why treating animals may be important in fighting resurgent tropical disease
As the World Health Organization steps up its efforts to eradicate a once-rampant tropical disease, a University of Washington study suggests that monitoring, and potentially treating, the monkeys that co-exist with humans in affected parts of the world may be part of the global strategy. Yaws, an infectious disease that causes disfiguring skin lesions and bone destruction - stems from a bacterium, Treponema pallidum , that also has been found in certain primates in Africa and Asia.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.04.2017
Nanopores could map small changes in DNA that signal big shifts in cancer
Nanopores could map small changes in DNA that signal big shifts in cancer
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Detecting cancer early, just as changes are beginning in DNA, could enhance diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the disease. A new study by University of Illinois researchers describes a method to detect, count and map tiny additions to DNA called methylations, which can be a warning sign of cancer, with unprecedented resolution.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
11.04.2017
Research identifies brain cells that keep mice active
Researchers at King's College London and the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a type of brain cell that prevents mice from being overly immobile. The research provides insight into the brain circuits underlying what motivates us to be physically active. The cells, called GAD65 neurons, are located in the mouse equivalent of the human lateral hypothalamus.
Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Everyone has different 'bad spots' in their vision
Everyone has different ’bad spots’ in their vision
The ability to distinguish objects in peripheral vision varies significantly between individuals, finds new research from UCL, Paris Descartes University and Dartmouth College, USA. For example, some people are better at spotting things above their centre of vision while others are better at spotting things off to the right.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
11.04.2017
Altering an enzyme pathway: new Yale study
Altering an enzyme pathway: new Yale study
Yale scientists in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry have combined state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance and computational techniques to effectively alter an important enzyme pathway and predictably alter enzyme function.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Setting a trap for autoimmunity
Approach captures immune disease cells in vivo, may be used to better understand diabetes, other autoimmune disorders Early in embryological development, the immune system learns not to attack the body's own cells.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Warwick polymers in NASA-funded project to high altitude
Anti-freeze polymers designed by University of Warwick launched into high altitude as part of successful NASA-funded schools project in the USA The polymers – developed in Professor Matthew Gib
Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Art of Science 7.0: Images show the beauty of research
Art of Science 7.0: Images show the beauty of research
Research images from the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology have been artistically enhanced to convey the beauty encountered daily in scientific research.
Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Prog rock giants Pink Floyd honoured in naming of newly-discovered shrimp
A strikingly bright pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers' favourite rock band - Pink Floyd.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
11.04.2017
Daeyeol Lee named the Duberg Professor of Neuroscience
Daeyeol Lee, newly named as the Dorys McConnell Duberg Professor of Neuroscience, focuses his research on the brain mechanisms of decision-making, in particular the role of the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia in reinforcement learning and economic choices. The long-term goal of research in Lee's laboratory is to understand how appropriate behaviors are chosen and their outcomes are evaluated by the neural networks in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia of the brain.
Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Relocation of Proteins with a New Nanobody Tool
Relocation of Proteins with a New Nanobody Tool
Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have developed a new method by which proteins can be transported to a new location in a cell. The novel tool enables scientists to study the function of proteins depending on their position by using nanobodies. The tool can be used for a wide range of proteins and in various areas of developmental biology.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
11.04.2017
Eat wild venison to support native woodland birds, says ecologist
Wild deer in Britain should be hunted for venison to drastically reduce their populations and support the re-emergence of our native woodland birds, according to an academic at The University of Nottingham. The comments follow the publication of a new study in the Journal of Applied Ecology which suggests that huge deer populations in England are damaging the important natural habitat which many ground-nesting woodland birds require.
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