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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08:00
Bacteria stab amoebae with daggers
Bacteria stab amoebae with daggers
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Vienna have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly. Bacteria have to watch out for amoeba.
Life Sciences
18.08.2017
Australians think science has made life easier - new poll
Most of us think the benefits of science have outweighed the harmful effects and science has made our lives easier, but around half of us think science has made our way of life change too fast.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
17.08.2017
Slippery liquid surfaces confuse mussels to prevent their adhesion to underwater structures
Non-toxic, lubricant-infused coatings deter mussels and prevent their attachment by disrupting their mechanosensory and adhesive systems  It all began with a bet at a conference in Italy in 2013.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.08.2017
Why the definition of polycystic ovary syndrome harms women
The changed definition of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) harms women and brings no clear benefit, say Australian scientists in today's British Medical Journal. In their expert opinion article , the authors say more research is needed to properly assess the harms and benefits of diagnosing and treating women across different ages, ethnicities, and sub-types of this controversial endocrine disorder.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.08.2017
UQ shares in $13m synthetic biology funding by CSIRO
UQ shares in $13m synthetic biology funding by CSIRO
Advancing research in fields as diverse as manufacturing, human health, agriculture and the protection of ecosystems will be the aim of a $13 million investment by CSIRO in which The University of Queensland features heavily.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
16.08.2017
ANU-led study solves mystery of how first animals appeared on Earth
These large and nutritious organisms at the base of the food web provided the burst of energy required for the evolution of complex ecosystems, where increasingly large and complex animals, including humans, could thrive on Earth. Research led by ANU has solved the mystery of how the first animals appeared on Earth, a pivotal moment for the planet without which humans would not exist.
Life Sciences
16.08.2017
Epiphany in the fish lab | Stanford News
Studying the brains of fish led undergraduate Danielle Katz in an unexpected direction - a degree in mechanical engineering.
Life Sciences
16.08.2017
Understanding human needs is key to wildlife ecology research - Durham University
The Primate and Predator Project based in the Soutpansberg mountain range of South Africa, aims to better understand the ecology of local species and the threat that human activity poses to their conservation.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.08.2017
Combination of traditional chemotherapy, new drug kills rare cancer cells in mice
ANN ARBOR-An experimental drug combined with the traditional chemotherapy drug cisplatin, when used in mice, destroyed a rare form of salivary gland tumor and prevented a recurrence within 300 days, a University of Michigan study found. Called adenoid cystic carcinoma, or ACC, this rare cancer affects 3,000-4,000 people annually, and typically arises in the salivary glands.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
16.08.2017
Researchers Explore Graphene’s Potential Use in Nanotechnology - News - Carnegie Mellon University
Carnegie Mellon University's Ge Yang, associate professor of biomedical engineering (BME) and computational biology , and Tzahi Cohen-Karni, assistant professor of BME and materials science and engineering, have determined that graphene is safe for neurons and non-neuronal cells and has long-term biocompatibility - making it an excellent material to use in devices that interface with the nervous system.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.08.2017
Combination vaccines do not overwhelm kids’ immune systems
Giving an injection that protects against multiple diseases will not overwhelm a child's immune system, as vaccines contain just a few antigens compared to what babies meet every day, says Kristine Macartney.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.08.2017
A tumor-suppressing gene can be harmful in some cancers | YaleNews
The TET2 tumor suppressor gene helps guard against blood cancers and perhaps protects against heart disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
August: 3D Printing of Living Artificial Tissues | News | University of Bristol
August: 3D Printing of Living Artificial Tissues | News | University of Bristol
A team from the University of Bristol's School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, together with scientists at the University of Oxford, has developed a new method to 3D-print stem cells to form complex living 3D structures.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
A New Method of 3D Printing Living Tissues | University of Oxford
A confocal micrograph of an artificial tissue containing 2 populations human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293T) printed in the form of an arborized structure within a cube. Image credit: Sam Olof/ Alexander Graham Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory-grown cells to form living structures.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
15.08.2017
New polymer allows researchers to study how proteins fold, function
New polymer allows researchers to study how proteins fold, function
ANN ARBOR-University of Michigan biophysicists and chemists have created a new polymer that mimics a cell membrane, allowing proteins found within cell membranes to fold and function naturally in the synthetic material. This could give researchers the opportunity to study how proteins behave in cells being ravaged by Alzheimer's disease and cancer.
Life Sciences
15.08.2017
Antifreeze to improve aeroplanes, ice cream and organ transplants
Design of aeroplane wings and storing organs for transplant both set to be safer and more effective, thanks to synthetic antifreeze developed by University of Warwick Inspired by natural antifreeze proteins, researchers create iron-based synthetic imitation which has been shown to slow growth of ice crystals Could protect aeroplane wings and wind turbines from ice damage, make ice cream smoother, or make freezing human tissue for transplantation
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.08.2017
Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine
Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — The Carle Illinois College of Medicine has appointed a permanent executive associate dean: Rashid Bashir , a professor and the department head of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
Bacterial machines that help create defensive 'mats' mapped by researchers
Bacterial machines that help create defensive 'mats’ mapped by researchers
The way that some bacteria produce the materials that form 'biofilms', which help them evade antibiotic attack, has been uncovered by scientists. The latest finding could eventually lead to new ways of getting around antibiotic resistance and help in making new, biologically inspired nanomaterials. When bacteria are stressed, for example when attacked by the immune system or antibiotics, they can club together and form a biofilm.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
CFI invests $4.2 million to boost 23 McGill research projects with cutting-edge labs and equipment
At Laurentian University today, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced a total investment of $52 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund for 220 new infrastructure projects nationally.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
New material that could aid body's cellular repair process | UCLA
New material that could aid body’s cellular repair process | UCLA
A research team led by UCLA biomolecular engineers and doctors has demonstrated a therapeutic material that could one day promote better tissue regeneration following a wound or a stroke. During the body's typical healing process, when tissues like skin are damaged the body grows replacement cells. Integrins are class of proteins that are important in the cellular processes critical to creating new tissue.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
14.08.2017
Early career scientists named Mong Fellows in Cornell Neurotech
Ten new Mong Family Foundation Fellows in Neurotech will work under the mentorship of faculty across Cornell to advance technologies that promise to provide insight into how brains work, as well as strategies to fix them when they don't.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.08.2017
Probiotics help poplar trees clean up toxins in Superfund sites
Probiotics help poplar trees clean up toxins in Superfund sites
Trees have the ability to capture and remove pollutants from the soil and degrade them through natural processes in the plant. It's a feat of nature companies have used to help clean up polluted sites, though only in small-scale projects. Now, a probiotic bacteria for trees can boost the speed and effectiveness of this natural cycle, providing a microbial partner to help protect trees from the toxic effects of the pollutants and break down the toxins plants bring in from contaminated groundwater.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
Dementia and brain research could be improved thanks to new sensor
Dementia and brain research could be improved thanks to new sensor
Scientists have improved the way that brain activity data is collected in mice, which could advance dementia and brain research. Scientists have improved the way that brain activity data is collected in mice, which could advance dementia and brain research. The research, published today Scientific Reports , describes a new ultra lightweight wireless sensor system for recording neural activity in the brains of mice.
Life Sciences
14.08.2017
UPSC celebrates 50 years of Plant Science in Umeċ - Umeċ University, Sweden
The Department of Plant Physiology started its work at Umeċ University in 1967. It is now part of the Umeċ Plant Science Centre (UPSC), a world leading plant research institute.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
Are your Genes your Destiny?
As part of National Science Week, the University of Sydney will host a screening of Gattaca followed by a panel discussion about ethics and genomics.
Literature/Linguistics - Life Sciences
14.08.2017
Stanford professor leads John Steinbeck revival | Stanford News
Gavin Jones, professor of English, calls for students and scholars to take a more serious look at writer John Steinbeck and his diverse interests.
Business/Economics - Life Sciences
11.08.2017
Hardware accelerator teams Rev-up product ideas at Demo Day
Hotel School student Liad Hare '18 of team Petal discusses his project during Rev: Ithaca Startup Work's Hardware Accelerator Demo Day, Aug.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
11.08.2017
Stanford’s Board of Trustees elects two new members | Stanford News
Felix J. Baker, a managing partner of Baker Brothers Investments, and Jerry Yang, co-founder of Yahoo! and founder of AME Cloud Ventures, will join the Stanford University Board of Trustees on October 1.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
New diagnostic kit for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers at Cardiff University and Cardiff and Vale University Health Board have developed a more reliable method of screening for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in newborn babies. In collaboration with biotechnology company PerkinElmer, they have developed a diagnostic kit that can accurately screen for the disorder by analysing neonatal dried blood spots.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
Michael Teitell named director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center | UCLA
Michael Teitell named director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center | UCLA
Dr. Michael Teitell, a renowned molecular immunologist and biochemist, has been named director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and president of the Jonsson Cancer Center Foundation.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
Attitudes on human genome editing vary, but all agree conversation is necessary
In early August 2017, an international team of scientists announced they had successfully edited the DNA of human embryos. As people process the political, moral and regulatory issues of the technology - which nudges us closer to nonfiction­ than science fiction - researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Temple University show the time is now to involve the American public in discussions about human genome editing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
How the microbiome could tackle antibiotic resistant infections in the lungs
How the microbiome could tackle antibiotic resistant infections in the lungs
Understanding how microbes contribute to respiratory health and immunity could help tackle drug resistant infections in the lungs, say scientists.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.08.2017
Plants love microbes - and so do farmers
Plants love microbes - and so do farmers
The Sunshine Coast's plant diversity has helped University of Queensland researchers confirm that nurture has the upper hand - at least when it comes to plant microbes. Australian Centre for Ecogenomics director Professor Phil Hugenholtz said a study of microbial communities necessary for plant development, led by UQ's Yun Kit Yeoh , could improve crop and plant yields.
Life Sciences - Social Sciences
09.08.2017
August: biology colour | News | University of Bristol
August: biology colour | News | University of Bristol
Colouration is a vitally important biological trait because it is involved in individual survival and with reproduction through camouflage, warning colouration, mate choice, social signalling, thwarting parasitism, as well as thermoregulation.
Life Sciences
09.08.2017
The wintering whereabouts of penguins | University of Oxford
Knowing where and how Antarctic penguins, seabirds and marine predators migrate is critical for conservation efforts. Although electronic tracking devices have helped scientists track marine animals' migration patterns, the devices can be expensive, invasive for the animal and challenging to retrieve.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.08.2017
Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that could aid understanding of infertility
Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that could aid understanding of infertility
ANN ARBOR-The first few weeks after sperm meets egg still hold many mysteries. Among them: what causes the process to fail, leading to many cases of infertility. Despite the importance of this critical stage, scientists haven't had a good way to explore what can go wrong, or even what must go right, after the newly formed ball of cells implants in the wall of the human uterus.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.08.2017
Patented biomedical implant could improve heart patient outcome
Over the course of a year, the average person's heart will beat nearly 40 million times. Stretched over a lifetime, that number often exceeds 2 billion.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.08.2017
Early puberty may mean less time in education for girls
Early puberty may mean less time in education for girls
The age at which girls have their first period may influence how long they stay in education.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.08.2017
UQ leads international consensus on antibiotics testing
UQ leads international consensus on antibiotics testing
Infectious disease experts are pushing for better evidence from clinical trials to help determine the most effective antibiotics to use when treating their sickest patients. A University of Queensland initiative brought together 27 researchers and clinicians from 11 countries, to reach a consensus on measurements when testing drugs for use against bloodstream infections, often referred to as ‘blood poisoning'.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08.08.2017
Asian hornet to colonise UK within two decades without action
Honey bees across Europe have been impacted by Asian hornet since it first arrived in France in 2004 Asian hornet could colonise UK and threaten bee populations in two decades unless action is taken, according to research by the Universities of Warwick and Newcastle working with the National Bee Unit.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.08.2017
Parasites, snails may factor in Adirondack moose decline
The apparent declining moose population in New York 's Adirondack Mountains may be caused partly by tiny parasite-transmitting snails eaten by moose as they forage vegetation, according to new resear
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
08.08.2017
How heat and drought kill trees
Drought-caused tree deaths are produced by a combination of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation, says new research published today in  Nature Ecology and Evolution .  The new finding, based on a meta-analysis by 62 scientists from across the world, will improve predictive models of how trees die in response to heat, drought, and other climate stresses.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.08.2017
Lizard venom may contain clues to treating blood clots
Lizard venom may contain clues to treating blood clots
Various types of lizard venom are being studied as possible treatments for blood clotting diseases that lead to millions of cases of stroke, heart attack and deep-vein thrombosis annually. University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences expert Associate Professor Bryan Fry said, while snake venom research has been extensive, lizard venom research was still in its infancy.
Life Sciences
08.08.2017
Rare audio of indigenous languages saved a century later
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Life Sciences - Sport Sciences
08.08.2017
Playing with your brain
Human-computer interactions, such as playing video games, can have a negative impact on the brain, says a new Canadian study published in Molecular Psychiatry . For over 10 years, scientists have told us that action video game players exhibit better visual attention, motor control abilities and short-term memory.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
07.08.2017
August: protein cages | News | University of Bristol
August: protein cages | News | University of Bristol
A multidisciplinary team from the Bristol BioDesign Institute has come together to study the self-assembly of protein building into protein cages, leading to new research which has potential applications in nanotechnology and synthetic biology.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
07.08.2017
Gene therapy via skin could treat diseases such as obesity | UChicago News
A University of Chicago-based research team has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy and demonstrated how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat many human diseases. In a study in the journal Cell Stem Cell , the researchers provide "proof-of-concept." They describe gene-therapy administered through skin transplants to treat two related and extremely common human ailments: Type 2 diabetes and obesity.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
07.08.2017
Restoring tropical rainforests
Abandoned oil palm plantations can regenerate forest canopy to levels often found in primary forest, providing a means to protect important wildlife habitats that are under threat from forest decline. A team of researchers, including Cardiff University researchers at the Danau Girang Field Centre in Borneo, found that abandoned plantations could regenerate in as little as 17 years, helping to reconnect isolated patches of forest where the movement of plants and animals has become inhibited, restricting breeding and biodiversity.
Life Sciences - Astronomy
07.08.2017
Space in Images - 2017 - 08 - Thirty year-old microbiology experiment
Space in Images - 2017 - 08 - Thirty year-old microbiology experiment
ESA Space in Images This humble parcel-sized hardware is Europe's very first closed-loop life-support experiment to fly in space, 30 years ago this week.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
07.08.2017
Using glucose to fuel drug delivery to the brain
Using glucose to fuel drug delivery to the brain
A new drug delivery system that autonomously navigates the body using its own glucose molecules has been developed and tested by a UCL-led team of scientists.
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