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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.05.2017
New answers for kids with inherited kidney disease
New answers for kids with inherited kidney disease
A new gene behind a rare form of inherited childhood kidney disease has been identified by a global research team. University of Queensland researchers were part of the team that made the discovery that will improve genetic testing and could provide clues for future treatments for autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).
Life Sciences
18:01
CT scans reveal underground world of worms
CT images of underground soil structures, created by worms and imaged by the University of Nottingham, are being revealed in a half-term display at the Science Museum in London from 29-31 May. A video of the 3D images can be seen here. The pictures show in detail the intricate tunnel structures created by earthworms.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18:00
Readily available antibiotic could help to curb lung damage from TB
Readily available antibiotic could help to curb lung damage from TB
Imperial scientists have found how a common antibiotic could help reduce lung destruction in people with Tuberculosis (TB). TB is a leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing 1.8 million deaths in 2015 and infecting one in three people globally, with or without symptoms. Left untreated, the disease can cause massive tissue damage in the lungs, leading to a contagious cough and eventual death.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
17:00
Interrogating proteins
Interrogating proteins
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new protein structure, and are using it to understand how protein structures are stabilised. This research will help to design small proteins and small molecules that could be the basis for future biotechnologies and medicines. A team of chemists and biochemists from the Bristol BioDesign Institute have designed a new protein structure.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16:00
Taking a Closer Look at Genetic Switches in Cancer
Taking a Closer Look at Genetic Switches in Cancer
Many things go wrong in cells during the development of cancer. At the heart of the chaos are often genetic switches that control the production of new cells.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
13:00
Animal welfare and research 3Rs symposium
Animal welfare and research 3Rs symposium
The University of Bristol held its first Animal Welfare and Research 3Rs symposium last month [Thursday 27 April].
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
11:01
Speeding up quality control for biologics
Speeding up quality control for biologics
Drugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other proteins, are being used to treat cancer, arthritis, and many other diseases. Monitoring the quality of these drugs has proven challenging, however, because protein production by living cells is much more difficult to control than the synthesis of traditional drugs.
Life Sciences
09:00
Digital birdhouses make studying owls easier
Digital birdhouses make studying owls easier
EPFL students have developed a system that can detect when barn owls fly into and out of their nests, without disturbing the birds.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08:01
University of Melbourne congratulates new Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science
Three University of Melbourne scientists have been elected as Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science, a rare honour, for their outstanding contributions to science.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.05.2017
Fundamentals drive UQ's new science Fellows
Fundamentals drive UQ’s new science Fellows
The thrill of fundamental discovery is a driving force for two University of Queensland professors who have today been named as new Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.05.2017
Researchers design moisture-responsive workout suit
Researchers design moisture-responsive workout suit
A team of MIT researchers has designed a breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete's body heat and sweat.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.05.2017
Novartis receives positive CHMP opinion for first-line use of Zykadia in ALK-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Phase III trial, first-line treatment with Zykadia resulted in improved progression-free survival (PFS) over SOC chemotherapy with maintenance, including in patients with brain metastases Zykadia is
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.05.2017
Sequencing of Green Alga Genome Provides Blueprint to Advance Clean Energy, Bioproducts
Plant biologists have sequenced the genome of a particularly promising species of green alga, providing a blueprint for new discoveries in producing sustainable biofuels, antioxidants, and other valuable bioproducts.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Life Sciences
19.05.2017
Extension, NYS apple growers partner on innovation
Jason Woodworth operates a tractor-mounted Darwin string thinning machine to thin apple blossoms on a fruit wall at the Lamont Fruit Farm in Waterport, New York.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.05.2017
Scientists to develop life-transforming drugs for Huntington's disease sufferers
Scientists to develop life-transforming drugs for Huntington’s disease sufferers
Scientists to develop life-transforming drugs for Huntington's disease sufferers Scientists at the University of Sussex have started work on a multi-million pound project to develop drugs to treat the debilitating loss of cognitive function associated with Huntington's disease.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
18.05.2017
‘most hunted' hot spots
‘most hunted’ hot spots
Caterpillars living near the equator are eight times more likely to be eaten by predators than those living closer to the poles, according to new research published . An international team made the discovery by gluing thousands of dummy caterpillars made of Plasticine on plants at 31 sites along an 11,635 km gradient from the Arctic Circle to southern Australia.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
18.05.2017
Biochemist Peter Hinkle dies at 76
Peter C. Hinkle, Cornell professor emeritus of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, died May 12 in Ithaca of pancreatic cancer.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.05.2017
Novartis data at ASCO, ICML and EHA meetings demonstrate meaningful advancements in cancer care
Updated analyses from the Kisqali pivotal Phase III MONALEESA-2 trial in hormone receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HR+/HER2-) advanced breast cancer to be presente
Life Sciences - Architecture
18.05.2017
15 new professors
15 new professors
At its meeting of 17 May 2017, the ETH Board appointed 15 new professors upon application of ETH Zurich President Lino Guzzella.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.05.2017
Engineering heart valves for the many
Harvard and the University of Zurich partner to create a next-generation heart valve that accurately functions upon implantation and regenerates into long-lasting heart-like tissue The human heart beats approximately 35 million times every year, pumping blood via four different heart valves.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.05.2017
Engineering far-reaching solutions
From the Canadian tundra to Cambodian villages, engineering thesis projects developed by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) students spanned the globe to tackle complex issues.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
17.05.2017
Role of nitrogen in shaping the toxicity of Lake Erie algal blooms
Role of nitrogen in shaping the toxicity of Lake Erie algal blooms
ANN ARBOR'While much of the work to curtail Lake Erie's harmful algal blooms has focused on the availability of phosphorus, a U-M-led team has for several years been investigating the role of another nutrient found in crop fertilizers, nitrogen, in shaping the toxicity of those blooms. In May 2014, a team led by U-M microbiologist and oceanographer Gregory Dick received a $250,000 grant for the study from the U-M Water Center.
Life Sciences
17.05.2017
Heirloom peonies, delicate tree peonies extend bloom season at U-M’s Nichols Arboretum
ANN ARBOR'The University of Michigan's Nichols Arboretum peony garden is about to undergo its annual transformation into a wave of white, pink and red as it bursts into nearly 10,000 blooms.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.05.2017
Startup wields natural bacterium to improve health of livestock
Rodrigo Bicalho, left, and John Kallassy, believe their new company Bactana Animal Health - which has just joined Cornell's McGovern Center - offers new, sustainable ways to help the health of livestock and other farm animals.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.05.2017
UW-Madison biochemist wins Shaw Scientist Award
Ophelia Venturelli , assistant professor of biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is one of two researchers in the University of Wisconsin System to earn seed funding from the Greater
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.05.2017
MIT Corporation life member and biotech pioneer Henri Termeer dies at 71
MIT Corporation life member and biotech pioneer Henri Termeer dies at 71
MIT Corporation life member and biotechnology pioneer Henri A. Termeer, who led the iconic Genzyme Corporation for nearly three decades, with a strong focus on combating rare diseases, died on Friday night at his home in Marblehead, Massachusetts.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.05.2017
The Gruber Foundation awards $1.5 million in prizes to three top scientists
The Gruber Foundation awards $1.5 million in prizes to three top scientists
The Gruber Foundation will award $1.5 million to an astronomer who explores populations of distant stars, a biologist who investigates how cells repair damaged DNA, and a neuroscientist who studies the formation of synapses that facilitate sight, the foundation announced May 17. The Yale-based Gruber International Prize Program annually honors individuals in the fields of cosmology, genetics and neuroscience for groundbreaking work that inspires and enables fundamental shifts in knowledge and culture.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.05.2017
Bioengineering, embryos and eggshells
Bioengineering, embryos and eggshells
Homerton Fellow Dr Michelle Oyen, a member of the Centre for Trophoblast Research, which this year celebrates its tenth anniversary, explains why she has dedicated her working life to investigating why pregnancies go wrong.
Life Sciences - Agronomy/Food Science
17.05.2017
Indonesian farm dollars can grow on trees
Indonesian farm dollars can grow on trees
Indonesian journalists have visited The University of Queensland to hear about a successful cattle fattening project in their nation's east which is bringing significant economic benefits for smallholder cattle farmers.
Business/Economics - Life Sciences
17.05.2017
Darwin visits Wall Street
Darwin visits Wall Street
If you have money in the stock market, then you are probably anticipating a profit over the long term - a rational expectation given that stocks have historically performed well.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
16.05.2017
Butterfly wings inspire invention that opens door to new solar technologies
There's a whole bunch of potential new applications using our light-control technique, including next-generation solar cell, architectural and stealth technologies.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.05.2017
New clues to healthy bones for those with PKU
Certain kinds of foods prescribed to manage the rare metabolic disorder phenylketonuria (PKU) could contribute to skeletal fragility seen in many PKU patients, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers. Led by Waisman Center and College of Agricultural and Life Sciences investigator Denise Ney and her graduate student Bridget Stroup , the study represents the first human clinical trial to compare how different PKU-specific diets affect the bone health of people living with the disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.05.2017
Scientists Sequence Genome of Snail That Spreads Parasitic Worm
Scientists Sequence Genome of Snail That Spreads Parasitic Worm
An international team of scientists, including a researcher from Berkeley Lab, have characterized the genome of Biomphalaria glabrata , a freshwater snail that transmits a parasitic worm responsible for the infectious disease schistosomiasis, also known as snail fever.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.05.2017
Stem cell transplantation
Cardiff University is pleased to announce plans to conduct a stem cell transplantation procedure that could benefit people affected by Huntington's disease (HD) in Wales.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.05.2017
Nicotine enhances bees? activity
Nicotine enhances bees? activity
Nicotine-laced nectar can speed up a bumblebee's ability to learn flower colours, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).             The researchers used artificial flowers in a tightly-monitored flight arena in the laboratory to mimic how flowering plants use animals as pollen carriers and reward pollinators with sugars found in floral nectar.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.05.2017
Venom becomes more potent as brown snakes age
Venom becomes more potent as brown snakes age
The “blood nuking” capabilities of adult brown snake venom only come about after an amazing transformation. New research led by University of Queensland scientist Associate Professor Bryan Fry has shown the venom of young brown snakes attacks the nervous system, while the venom of older snakes has dangerous effects on the circulatory system.
Life Sciences
16.05.2017
Making brain implants smaller could prolong their lifespan
Making brain implants smaller could prolong their lifespan
Many diseases, including Parkinson's disease, can be treated with electrical stimulation from an electrode implanted in the brain. However, the electrodes can produce scarring, which diminishes their effectiveness and can necessitate additional surgeries to replace them. MIT researchers have now demonstrated that making these electrodes much smaller can essentially eliminate this scarring, potentially allowing the devices to remain in the brain for much longer.
Life Sciences
15.05.2017
Frisky female fruit flies become more aggressive after sex
Female fruit flies start headbutting each other after mating, becoming significantly more aggressive and intolerant Oxford University research has revealed. Female fruit flies' levels of aggression soar after sex, when a variety of proteins, which flow freely in semen, stimulate dramatic behavioural and physiological changes in females.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
15.05.2017
Renowned biochemist David B. Wilson dies at 77
David B. Wilson, professor of molecular biology and genetics and a world leader in the field of enzymology, died April 29.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
15.05.2017
Gladiator games: Biodiversity can offer protection to weaker species
If you pit a pair of gladiators, one strong and one weak, against each other 10 times, the outcome will likely be the same every time: The stronger competitor will defeat the weak. But if you add into the field additional competitors of varying strength levels, even the weakest competitors might be able to survive - if only because they're able to find a quiet corner to hide.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
15.05.2017
How cities can prepare for the future
How cities can prepare for the future
Research news What measures are needed to make cities "green" and get them ready for the future? An interdisciplinary team at the Centre for Urban Ecology and Climate Adaptation of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is conducting research on these questions.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.05.2017
Focusing on link between diet and cancer
Lyndon Wood, one of the UK's most successful entrepreneurs, is helping to fund new research into the prevention of bowel cancer.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.05.2017
Stem cells in plants and animals behave surprisingly similarly: study
Stem cells in plants and animals behave surprisingly similarly: study
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the behaviour of stem cells in plants and animals is surprisingly similar. The researchers were able to produce mathematical equations that reveal very small differences in the behaviour of the proteins. The results can hopefully be used in stem cell research involving humans.
Life Sciences
12.05.2017
First Fine Structure of Complete Vertebrate Brain
Findings could lead to better understanding of human brains By Ken Chiacchia Thousands of electron microscopic images viewed on edge are combined to recreate the eye, ear, brain, nose and several vertebrae of a zebrafish. Scientists have generated the first 3D map of a vertebrate brain that shows all the connections between nerve cells.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.05.2017
Opinion: How epigenetics may help us slow down the ageing clock
Opinion: How epigenetics may help us slow down the ageing clock
Why do we age when we get older? Epigenetics may hold the answer - but could it one day help us turn back the clock? Professor Wolf Reik from the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge and Dr Oliver Stegle from the European Bioinformatics Institute look at the ‘epigenetic clock' in The Conversation .
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.05.2017
Prestigious scholarships to foster ‘blue sky’ research
Following a global competition, five leading researchers from the Melbourne Biomedical Precinct have been awarded the prestigious title of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) International Research Scholar.
Life Sciences - Mathematics
11.05.2017
Sniffing out stem cell fates in the nose
Sniffing out stem cell fates in the nose
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Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
11.05.2017
Scientists publish first comprehensive map of proteins within cells
Scientists publish first comprehensive map of proteins within cells
The first analysis of how proteins are arranged in a cell has been , revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell.  We have created the most detailed map of how proteins are arranged in a cell Kathryn Lilley Using the Sweden-based Cell Atlas, researchers examined the spatial distribution of the human proteome (the entire complement of proteins that make up the human body) that correspond to the majority of protein-coding genes.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
11.05.2017
UofG Professor recognised for his dedicated research on carotenoid biochemistry
UofG Professor recognised for his dedicated research on carotenoid biochemistry
Professor Richard Cogdell, Hooker Chair of Botany at the Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology, has been awarded a Fellowship of the International Carotenoid Society as well as their Trevor Goodwin Award.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
11.05.2017
‘Molecular prosthetics’ can replace missing proteins to treat disease
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers have demonstrated that a small molecule can transport iron in human cells and live animals when proteins that normally do the same job are missing, a condition that often causes severe anemia in patients. Such “molecular prosthetics” might treat a host of incurable diseases caused by protein deficiencies, such as anemias, cystic fibrosis or certain types of heart disease.
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