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Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Disrupting insects’ sense of smell may save crops and human lives
The findings could help us to design better insecticides and find more efficient ways to reduce insect populations so they spread less disease and destroy fewer crops. An international team of scientists say disrupting the ability of insects to smell the scent of food and potential mates may offer a way to protect humans from deadly diseases such as malaria and agricultural crops from pests.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Tumour survival tactics tackled by Nottingham experts
Scientists at The University of Nottingham are tackling a tumour survival mechanism that has left experts baffled for more than 50 years. Their research – the culmination of 10 years of work – has revealed how cancer cells develop a resistance to the drugs prescribed to kill them in a tactic similar to antibiotic resistance.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
How grassland management without the loss of species works
How grassland management without the loss of species works
Research news The intensive management of grasslands is bad for biodiversity.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
27.06.2017
A mouse's view of the world, seen through its whiskers
A mouse’s view of the world, seen through its whiskers
!- Start of DoubleClick Floodlight Tag: Please do not remove Activity name of this tag: UCB001CP Retargeting URL of the webpage where the tag is expected to be placed: http://unknown This tag must be placed between the Mice, unlike cats and dogs, are able to move their whiskers to map out their surroundings, much as humans use their fingers to build a 3D picture of a darkened room.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.06.2017
Brain signals deliver first targeted treatment for world's most common movement disorder
Brain signals deliver first targeted treatment for world’s most common movement disorder
Essential tremor is the world's most common movement disorder, affecting an estimated 7 million people in the U.S. alone.
Life Sciences - Law/Forensics
27.06.2017
Non-approved keeping of animals: Münster University Commission to investigate accusations: Decision taken by Rectorate / Commission to be headed by lawyer Prof. Janbernd Oebbecke
The Rectorate at the University of Münster has decided to set up an internal Commission of Enquiry to investigate the accusations made in connection with a non-approved room for laboratory mice at the Faculty of Medicine.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Transforming HIV: Q&A with Professor Sarah Fidler
Transforming HIV: Q&A with Professor Sarah Fidler
Since the discovery that the HIV virus was the cause of the devastating AIDS pandemic, researchers have been focused on tackling its global impact. More than 37 million people are living with HIV ( Human Immunodeficiency virus ) today. Whilst AIDS carried a death sentence in the 1980s, the development of powerful antiretroviral drugs, have drastically improved the prognosis and survival rates.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
New research into antibiotic treatment for killer sepsis
University of Warwick expertise is contributing to a world-first £1.5million study aiming to tackle one of the biggest public health threats we face – antibiotic resistance.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
From bug to drug: tick saliva could be key to treating heart disease
Proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a potentially fatal form of heart disease, according to new Oxford University research. Myocarditis can cause sudden cardiac death in young adults, and occurs when the heart muscle becomes inflamed, often as a result of an infection caused by common viruses.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Bacteria-coated nanofiber electrodes digest pollutants
Cornell materials scientists and bioelectrochemical engineers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Study raises doubts about safety of some forms of birth control pills
ANN ARBOR'New research on how birth control pills affect the level of hormones in women's blood serum has found much higher levels of hormones in women who take birth control pills compared to women who don't.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.06.2017
Morgridge scientists illuminate structures vital to virus replication
Pictured is a three-dimensional rendering of a virus RNA replication spherule. The mitochondrial outer membrane is in dark blue, the spherule membrane in white, the interior spherule RNA density in red, and the spherule crown aperture in light blue. UW-Madison In the fight against the viruses that invade everyday life, seeing and understanding the battleground is essential.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Sandoz receives approval in Europe for Erelzi (biosimilar etanercept) to treat multiple inflammatory diseases
European Commission approves Sandoz Erelzi to treat immunological diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis Approval of Erelzi provides more treatment options for heal
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
27.06.2017
Volunteers wanted for new dementia study
Researchers at ANU are looking for people who are experiencing memory or other cognitive problems in daily life to take part in a new study on how to reduce the risk of dementia.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
26.06.2017
Symposium explores possibilities of origami nanomachines
Yan Yang, a graduate student in the field of chemistry and chemical biology, explains her research on ‘Non-Covalent Interactions in Covalent Organic Frameworks.
Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
26.06.2017
Scientists create a cellular guillotine for studying single-cell wound repair
In an effort to understand how single cells heal, Mechanical engineer Sindy Tang developed a microscopic guillotine that efficiently cuts cells in two.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.06.2017
Microbe Mystery Solved: What Happened to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Plume
Microbe Mystery Solved: What Happened to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Plume
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 is one of the most studied spills in history, yet scientists haven't agreed on the role of microbes in eating up the oil. Now a research team at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has identified all of the principal oil-degrading bacteria as well as their mechanisms for chewing up the many different components that make up the released crude oil.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.06.2017
New tool offers snapshots of neuron activity
New tool offers snapshots of neuron activity
Many cognitive processes, such as decision-making, take place within seconds or minutes. Neuroscientists have longed to capture neuron activity during such tasks, but that dream has remained elusive - until now. A team of MIT and Stanford University researchers has developed a way to label neurons when they become active, essentially providing a snapshot of their activity at a moment in time.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
26.06.2017
Drugs: how to pick a winner in clinical trials
Drugs: how to pick a winner in clinical trials
When a drug fails late on in clinical trials it's a major setback for launching new medicines. It can cost millions, even billions, of research and development funds.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
26.06.2017
Microscope can scan tumors during surgery and examine cancer biopsies in 3-D
Microscope can scan tumors during surgery and examine cancer biopsies in 3-D
When women undergo lumpectomies to remove breast cancer, doctors try to remove all the cancerous tissue while conserving as much of the healthy breast tissue as possible.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
26.06.2017
Novel Viral Vectors Deliver Useful Cargo to Neurons Throughout the Brain and Body
Novel Viral Vectors Deliver Useful Cargo to Neurons Throughout the Brain and Body
Viruses have evolved to be highly effective vehicles for delivering genes into cells. Seeking to take advantage of these traits, scientists can reprogram viruses to function as vectors, capable of carrying their genetic cargo of choice into the nuclei of cells in the body.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
26.06.2017
Enzyme key to triggering anti-cancer immune response
An enzyme implicated in autoimmune diseases and viral infections also regulates radiation therapy's ability to trigger an immune response against cancer, Weill Cornell Medicine scientists found in a new study. Their discovery can help to better tailor treatment for patients. Immunotherapy is an innovative approach to cancer treatment that unleashes the power of the immune system to fight the disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
26.06.2017
Roche’s emicizumab showed positive results in phase III studies (HAVEN 1 and HAVEN 2) in haemophilia A with inhibitors
Roche's emicizumab showed positive results in phase III studies (HAVEN 1 and HAVEN 2) in haemophilia A with inhibitors Emicizumab showed substantial and clinically meaningful reduction in bleeds across two pivotal studies Data from HAVEN 1 in adults and adolescents and interim data from HAVEN 2 in children to be presented at the 26th International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) Meeting Roche today announced positive data from the p
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Chinese investment in biomedical research
Cardiff University is joining forces with a major Chinese biomedical service provider to explore key biomedical and clinical research opportunities.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
NEJM publishes full analysis of Rydapt (midostaurin) Phase III RATIFY trial in newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML)
Significant overall survival benefit observed for FLT3+ AML patients consistent across FLT3 mutation subgroups, including ITD and TKD Detailed data show Rydapt plus standard chemotherapy improved eve
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Treating antibiotic-resistant TB
A newly discovered antibiotic, produced by bacteria from a cystic fibrosis patient, could be used to treat cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). This is the finding of a team of scientists from Cardiff University's School of Biosciences and the University of Warwick. The problem of antibiotic-resistant infections is well documented, and it is estimated that by 2040, more than a third of all TB cases in Russia, for example, could show resistance to the drugs currently used to fight the disease.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Novartis Kisqali (ribociclib) receives positive CHMP opinion as first-line treatment for HR+/HER2- locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer in combination with any aromatase inhibitor
Novartis Kisqali (ribociclib) receives positive CHMP opinion as first-line treatment for HR+/HER2- locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer in combination with any aromatase inhibitor CHMP opinio
Agronomy/Food Science - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Cornell to team with IBM to protect global milk supply
Cornell and IBM announced a joint research project June 23 that will use genetic sequencing and big-data analyses to help keep the global milk supply safe.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Novartis pivotal CTL019 6-month follow-up data show durable remission rates in children, young adults with r/r B-cell ALL
83% of patients achieved complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete blood count recovery within 3 months of treatment with CTL019; consistent with interim ELIANA data   Data evaluating 63 patients demonstrate relapse-free survival and probability of survival in a majority of patients at six months   Advances in CTL019 and ELIANA result from global CAR-T cell therapy collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania   CTL019 is manufactured us
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Presentation confirms Venclexta/Venclyxto monotherapy benefit in certain patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and its potential in other hard-to-treat blood cancers
Presentation confirms Venclexta/Venclyxto monotherapy benefit in certain patients with high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and its potential in other hard-to-treat blood cancers First in class BCL2-specific oral inhibitor represents a potential new way of treating different blood cancers Efficacy and tolerability confirmed in high-risk patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, including those with 17p chromosomal de
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
FDA approves Rituxan Hycela (rituximab and hyaluronidase human) for subcutaneous injection in certain blood cancers
FDA approves Rituxan Hycela (rituximab and hyaluronidase human) for subcutaneous injection in certain blood cancers Treatment can be administered in five to seven minutes, compared to 1.5 hour
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
23.06.2017
Novartis combination targeted therapy Tafinlar + Mekinist receives FDA approval for BRAF V600E mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Novartis combination targeted therapy Tafinlar + Mekinist receives FDA approval for BRAF V600E mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) Approval provides first targeted treatment in the U
Life Sciences - Mathematics
22.06.2017
How eggs got their shapes
The evolution of the amniotic egg - complete with membrane and shell - was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air. Now, 360 million years later, bird eggs come in all shapes and sizes, from the almost perfectly spherical eggs of brown hawkowls to the tear-drop shape of sandpipers' eggs.  The question is, how and why did this diversity in shape evolve? The answer to that question may help explain how birds evolved and solve an old mystery in natural history.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.06.2017
U.S. drug policy needs a dose of neuroscience
Legal and illegal drugs are killing more people than AIDS ever did, yet the nation's drug policies are based on unproven assumptions about addiction.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.06.2017
Study Sheds Light on How Bacterial Organelles Assemble
Study Sheds Light on How Bacterial Organelles Assemble
Scientists are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. The work, led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Michigan State University (MSU), will appear in the June 23 issue of the journal Science .
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.06.2017
Custom built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapy
Custom built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapy
Scientists at the University of Bath funded by Cancer Research UK have custom-built a molecule which stops breast cancer cells from multiplying in laboratory trials, and hope it will eventually lead to a treatment for the disease. But perhaps even more importantly the method they used to create the molecule has potential to be applied to develop new treatments for a wide range of cancers and other diseases.
Veterinary Science - Life Sciences
22.06.2017
University closes non-approved facility for laboratory mice: By order of the local Veterinary Office after tip-off from within Faculty / Rector: "We are appalled at this breach of trust"
The Faculty of Medicine at the University of Münster has, by order of the local Veterinary Office, closed with immediate effect a non-approved facility for laboratory mice at one of the Faculty's institutes.
Life Sciences - Event
22.06.2017
£2 million award will advance understanding of mechanisms of learning and memory
£2 million award will advance understanding of mechanisms of learning and memory
Neuroscientists at the University of Bristol have been awarded a prestigious £2 million Wellcome Trust Investigator Award for a five-year study to investigate the neuronal circuits that drive our recognition memory.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
22.06.2017
Computer-designed antibodies target toxins associated with Alzheimer's disease
Computer-designed antibodies target toxins associated with Alzheimer’s disease
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have designed antibodies that target the protein deposits in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, and stop their production.  If we can find better and cheaper ways of producing antibodies, we would increase the chances of finding treatments for patients Michele Vendruscolo The researchers used computer-based methods to develop antibodies - the star players of the body's natural defence system - to target the deposits of misfolded proteins which are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.06.2017
Microbe generates extraordinarily diverse array of peptide
Microbe generates extraordinarily diverse array of peptide
It's one of the tiniest organisms on Earth, but also one of the most abundant.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.06.2017
Bronfenbrenner talk highlights inequalities in children’s health
University of Pittsburgh professor Karen Matthews explored biological links to persistent social inequalities in childhood health during the 2017 Bronfenbrenner Lecture, held June 15 in Martha Van Rensselaer Hall.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.06.2017
New Mechanism for Genome Regulation
New Mechanism for Genome Regulation
The same mechanisms that quickly separate mixtures of oil and water are at play when controlling the organization in an unusual part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new study by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Researchers studying genome and cell biology provide evidence that heterochromatin organizes large parts of the genome into specific regions of the nucleus using liquid-liquid phase separation, a mechanism well known in physics but whose importance for biology has only recently been revealed.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.06.2017
Podcast: Life as a postdoc, reading brain age and sounding out scientists
In this edition: Finding out what every postdoc needs to know, how old your brain is, and how an Imperial researcher made an award-winning podcast.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.06.2017
The bug hunters and the microbiome
The bug hunters and the microbiome
Trevor Lawley and Gordon Dougan are bug hunters, albeit not the conventional kind. The bugs they collect are invisible to the naked eye.
Life Sciences
21.06.2017
The world's largest canary
The world’s largest canary
Biologists at Lund University, together with their colleagues from Portugal and the UK, have now proven that the endangered São Tomé grosbeak is the world's largest canary - 50 per cent larger than the runner-up.
Event - Life Sciences
21.06.2017
Bristol-led scientific paper wins RSPB award
Bristol-led scientific paper wins RSPB award
A scientific paper led by a team of biologists from the University of Bristol has won a major award from the RSPB. ‘Historical nectar assessment reveals the fall and rise of floral resources in Britain' was published by the journal Nature in February 2016 and featured as the front page story for that week's edition of the magazine.
Life Sciences - Computer Science/Telecom
21.06.2017
Clear view on stem cell development
Clear view on stem cell development
Research news Today, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
21.06.2017
Novartis achieves important regulatory milestone for AMG 334 (erenumab) in migraine prevention with EMA filing acceptance
AMG 334 (erenumab) is the first anti-CGRP monoclonal antibody developed for migraine prevention to receive EMA regulatory filing acceptance   Filing is supported by a comprehensive clinical program o
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
20.06.2017
Regenerating the heart: A Q&A with Dr Susanne Sattler
Regenerating the heart: A Q&A with Dr Susanne Sattler
Around 915,000 people in the UK today have had heart attacks, which deprive heart cells of oxygen, causing them to die and be replaced by scar tissue.
Event - Life Sciences
20.06.2017
Scientist named Innovator of the Year for sight-saving device
Scientist named Innovator of the Year for sight-saving device
Dr Shelby Temple, from the University of Bristol's School of Biological Sciences, has been named Innovator of the Year 2017 for his ground-breaking work into polarisation and macular degeneration.
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