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Medicine/Pharmacology



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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
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Bacteria stab amoebae with daggers
Bacteria stab amoebae with daggers
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Vienna have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly. Bacteria have to watch out for amoeba.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
18.08.2017
$2.3m boost to tackle youth alcohol and drug abuse
University of Queensland work to reduce the risk of alcohol, tobacco and other drug-related harm among young people has benefited from $2.31 million in Federal Government funding.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.08.2017
Why the definition of polycystic ovary syndrome harms women
The changed definition of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) harms women and brings no clear benefit, say Australian scientists in today's British Medical Journal. In their expert opinion article , the authors say more research is needed to properly assess the harms and benefits of diagnosing and treating women across different ages, ethnicities, and sub-types of this controversial endocrine disorder.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.08.2017
A policy powerhouse launches at University of Sydney
The University of Sydney has launched the Sydney Policy Lab today with 14 projects aimed at addressing vital Australian and international policy issues.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.08.2017
UQ shares in $13m synthetic biology funding by CSIRO
UQ shares in $13m synthetic biology funding by CSIRO
Advancing research in fields as diverse as manufacturing, human health, agriculture and the protection of ecosystems will be the aim of a $13 million investment by CSIRO in which The University of Queensland features heavily.
Veterinary Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
Veterinary college mends, releases injured bobcat
In April, Cornell's Janet L. Swanson Wildlife Health Center (WHC) admitted a young male bobcat after he was hit by a car in Lansing, New York.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
Podcast: Cassini’s farewell, the myth of ’fat but fit’ and bugs galore
In this edition: Saying goodbye to Saturn spacecraft Cassini, exploring whether people can be 'fat but fit' and meeting some bugs at Silwood Park.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
16.08.2017
Pushing Patients to Online Care Options May Have Unintended Consequences
Health care providers using e-visits may see increase in office visits, reduced capacity for new patients, and few health benefits for patients E-visits, electronic communications between patients an
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
16.08.2017
New research and education role for Imperial academic
New research and education role for Imperial academic
Doctor Caroline Alexander has been appointed Lead Clinical Academic for Therapies. Dr Alexander is a Clinical Academic within the therapy department of Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (ICHT) and Adjunct Reader at Imperial College London.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.08.2017
Combination of traditional chemotherapy, new drug kills rare cancer cells in mice
ANN ARBOR-An experimental drug combined with the traditional chemotherapy drug cisplatin, when used in mice, destroyed a rare form of salivary gland tumor and prevented a recurrence within 300 days, a University of Michigan study found. Called adenoid cystic carcinoma, or ACC, this rare cancer affects 3,000-4,000 people annually, and typically arises in the salivary glands.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.08.2017
Combination vaccines do not overwhelm kids’ immune systems
Giving an injection that protects against multiple diseases will not overwhelm a child's immune system, as vaccines contain just a few antigens compared to what babies meet every day, says Kristine Macartney.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
For post-menopausal women, vaginal estrogens do not raise risk of cancer, other diseases | UCLA
FINDINGS Women who have gone through menopause and who have been using a vaginal form of estrogen therapy do not have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer than women who have not been using any type of estrogen. Among women with an intact uterus, the risks of stroke, invasive breast cancer, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis were not significantly different between vaginal estrogen users and nonusers.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
Why we’re at higher risk of exposure to deadly Hendra virus 
Risk of exposure to the deadly Hendra virus carried by fruit bats is rising due to human intrusion into their habitats, human proximity to woodlands and vegetation loss.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.08.2017
A tumor-suppressing gene can be harmful in some cancers | YaleNews
The TET2 tumor suppressor gene helps guard against blood cancers and perhaps protects against heart disease.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
August: 3D Printing of Living Artificial Tissues | News | University of Bristol
August: 3D Printing of Living Artificial Tissues | News | University of Bristol
A team from the University of Bristol's School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, together with scientists at the University of Oxford, has developed a new method to 3D-print stem cells to form complex living 3D structures.
Research Rankings - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
Prestigious Rankings Name UC San Diego 15th Best University in the World
The University of California San Diego has been ranked the 15th best university in the world by the 2017 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
A New Method of 3D Printing Living Tissues | University of Oxford
A confocal micrograph of an artificial tissue containing 2 populations human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293T) printed in the form of an arborized structure within a cube. Image credit: Sam Olof/ Alexander Graham Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory-grown cells to form living structures.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.08.2017
Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine
Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — The Carle Illinois College of Medicine has appointed a permanent executive associate dean: Rashid Bashir , a professor and the department head of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
Bacterial machines that help create defensive 'mats' mapped by researchers
Bacterial machines that help create defensive 'mats’ mapped by researchers
The way that some bacteria produce the materials that form 'biofilms', which help them evade antibiotic attack, has been uncovered by scientists. The latest finding could eventually lead to new ways of getting around antibiotic resistance and help in making new, biologically inspired nanomaterials. When bacteria are stressed, for example when attacked by the immune system or antibiotics, they can club together and form a biofilm.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
Complementary Medicine course begins in 2018
Pharmacists will have the opportunity to complete a Graduate Certificate of Complementary Medicine in 2018. The University of Sydney's Faculty of Pharmacy is offering a Graduate Certificate in Evidence-Based Complementary Medicines to commence in the first semester in 2018. The course, which was developed for pharmacists, will provide the highest level of education with respect to complementary medicines for pharmacy practice.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
CFI invests $4.2 million to boost 23 McGill research projects with cutting-edge labs and equipment
At Laurentian University today, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, announced a total investment of $52 million from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund for 220 new infrastructure projects nationally.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.08.2017
Smart mat detects early warning signs of foot ulcers
Smart mat detects early warning signs of foot ulcers
While completing his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in the mid-2000s, Jon Bloom saw his fair share of foot amputations among patients with diabetes.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
14.08.2017
Off-Label Use of Ketamine as a Treatment for Mood Disorders | JAMA | The JAMA Network
A growing number of small clinical trials have demonstrated that subanesthetic doses of ketamine can produce antidepressant effects in patients with mood disorders who have demonstrated refractoriness to standard therapies. 1 Patients in these trials have been diagnosed with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder, and the sample sizes have ranged from 8 to 99.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
New material that could aid body's cellular repair process | UCLA
New material that could aid body’s cellular repair process | UCLA
A research team led by UCLA biomolecular engineers and doctors has demonstrated a therapeutic material that could one day promote better tissue regeneration following a wound or a stroke. During the body's typical healing process, when tissues like skin are damaged the body grows replacement cells. Integrins are class of proteins that are important in the cellular processes critical to creating new tissue.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.08.2017
Probiotics help poplar trees clean up toxins in Superfund sites
Probiotics help poplar trees clean up toxins in Superfund sites
Trees have the ability to capture and remove pollutants from the soil and degrade them through natural processes in the plant. It's a feat of nature companies have used to help clean up polluted sites, though only in small-scale projects. Now, a probiotic bacteria for trees can boost the speed and effectiveness of this natural cycle, providing a microbial partner to help protect trees from the toxic effects of the pollutants and break down the toxins plants bring in from contaminated groundwater.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
14.08.2017
£2m ESRC grant to tackle the threat of antimicrobial resistance in surgery
£2m ESRC grant to tackle the threat of antimicrobial resistance in surgery
Imperial researchers have received a funding injection to help tackle the threat of drug resistant microbes for patients undergoing surgery.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
14.08.2017
State Access Standards do Little to Improve Access to Specialists in Medicaid | Yale School of Public Health
More needs to be done to eliminate the gap in access to specialty care for Medicaid patients, a new Yale School of Public Health study in JAMA Internal Medicine concludes.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
August: PreScribed Edinburgh Show | News | University of Bristol
August: PreScribed Edinburgh Show | News | University of Bristol
PreScribed (a life written for me) opens in Edinburgh this week and explores the alarming statistic that one in five practising GPs suffer from chronic stress and anxiety.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
How did the Franklin expedition crew die? U-M professor analyzes sailors’ mouths for clues
ANN ARBOR-A University of Michigan dentistry professor drew upon his expertise in oral health in developing a new theory to help explain the deaths of the famed Franklin naval expedition crew, a mystery that has captivated historians for more than 150 years.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
Dementia and brain research could be improved thanks to new sensor
Dementia and brain research could be improved thanks to new sensor
Scientists have improved the way that brain activity data is collected in mice, which could advance dementia and brain research. Scientists have improved the way that brain activity data is collected in mice, which could advance dementia and brain research. The research, published today Scientific Reports , describes a new ultra lightweight wireless sensor system for recording neural activity in the brains of mice.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
Drug Approval: New Country Comparison Shows Great Savings Potential
The regulatory requirements for the approval of new drugs vary greatly internationally in regards to the resources allocated to the authorities, the evaluation periods for approval and the fees for the pharmaceutical companies. This reports a study of the European Center of Pharmaceutical Medicine at the University of Basel.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.08.2017
Are your Genes your Destiny?
As part of National Science Week, the University of Sydney will host a screening of Gattaca followed by a panel discussion about ethics and genomics.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
14.08.2017
The sky's the limit for our Young Tall Poppies
The sky’s the limit for our Young Tall Poppies
Grain research technology that will help combat food shortages stemming from climate change and a burgeoning world population have helped a young researcher claim the title of Advance Queensland Young Tall Poppy Scientist of the Year.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
11.08.2017
Canary in a coal mine: Survey captures global picture of air pollution’s effects on birds
A sparrow perches on a branch in Curtis Prairie at the UW Arboretum. The efficiency of birds' respiratory systems is thought to make them more vulnerable to pollutants in the air. Photo: Jeff Miller Famously, the use of caged birds to alert miners to the invisible dangers of gases such as carbon monoxide gave rise to the cautionary metaphor "canary in a coal mine." But other than the fact that exposure to toxic gases in a confined space kills caged birds before affecting humans - providing a timely warning to miners - what do we know about the effects of air pollution on birds?
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
11.08.2017
Stanford’s Board of Trustees elects two new members | Stanford News
Felix J. Baker, a managing partner of Baker Brothers Investments, and Jerry Yang, co-founder of Yahoo! and founder of AME Cloud Ventures, will join the Stanford University Board of Trustees on October 1.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.08.2017
Local innovators funded to develop ideas
Eight Welsh organisations have received funding from a £5m fund that will accelerate innovation in public services - improving services and generating cash savings.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
New diagnostic kit for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers at Cardiff University and Cardiff and Vale University Health Board have developed a more reliable method of screening for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in newborn babies. In collaboration with biotechnology company PerkinElmer, they have developed a diagnostic kit that can accurately screen for the disorder by analysing neonatal dried blood spots.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
Michael Teitell named director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center | UCLA
Michael Teitell named director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center | UCLA
Dr. Michael Teitell, a renowned molecular immunologist and biochemist, has been named director of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and president of the Jonsson Cancer Center Foundation.
Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.08.2017
Chemists use electricity to amp up drug manufacturing
Give your medicine a jolt. By using a technique that combines electricity and chemistry, future pharmaceuticals - including many of the top prescribed medications in the United States - soon may be easily scaled up to be manufactured in a more sustainable way.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
Attitudes on human genome editing vary, but all agree conversation is necessary
In early August 2017, an international team of scientists announced they had successfully edited the DNA of human embryos. As people process the political, moral and regulatory issues of the technology - which nudges us closer to nonfiction­ than science fiction - researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Temple University show the time is now to involve the American public in discussions about human genome editing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.08.2017
How the microbiome could tackle antibiotic resistant infections in the lungs
How the microbiome could tackle antibiotic resistant infections in the lungs
Understanding how microbes contribute to respiratory health and immunity could help tackle drug resistant infections in the lungs, say scientists.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
10.08.2017
An expert in tiny medical helpers
An expert in tiny medical helpers
Simone Schürle likes to get to the bottom of things. Since August, the microand nanotechnology expert has been working as Assistant Professor of Responsive Biomedical Systems at ETH Zurich to develop tiny machines for medical applications in the human body.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
10.08.2017
’Retraining’ the immune system
It may be possible to ‘retrain' the immune system to slow the progression of type 1 diabetes, according to a study by Cardiff University and King's College London. Researchers leading the MonoPepT1De trial observed noticeable changes in the behaviour of the immune systems of type 1 diabetes patients that had been injected with peptides - small fragments of the protein molecules found in the beta cells of the pancreas.
Pedagogy/Education Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.08.2017
Parents of premature babies as happy as other parents by adulthood
Parents of premature and very low birth weight babies have same life satisfaction as parents of full-term babies, when their children reach adulthood - new University of Warwick research - Pioneeri
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.08.2017
Plants love microbes - and so do farmers
Plants love microbes - and so do farmers
The Sunshine Coast's plant diversity has helped University of Queensland researchers confirm that nurture has the upper hand - at least when it comes to plant microbes. Australian Centre for Ecogenomics director Professor Phil Hugenholtz said a study of microbial communities necessary for plant development, led by UQ's Yun Kit Yeoh , could improve crop and plant yields.
Medicine/Pharmacology - History/Archeology
10.08.2017
Medical experimentation on slaves in 18th-century Caribbean colonies | Stanford News
In her new book, Stanford historian Londa Schiebinger examines the development of medical knowledge and the experiments conducted on slaves in British and French colonies between the 1760s and the early 1800s. In 1972, the American public learned that the United States government let hundreds of black men go untreated for syphilis as part of a research experiment.
Medicine/Pharmacology
10.08.2017
New pain management study for dogs
Just like their owners, man's best friend can also suffer from osteoarthritis, a type of arthritis that occurs when cartilage at the ends of bones wears down causing pain, swelling and problems moving the joint.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.08.2017
Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that could aid understanding of infertility
Amniotic sac in a dish: Stem cells form structures that could aid understanding of infertility
ANN ARBOR-The first few weeks after sperm meets egg still hold many mysteries. Among them: what causes the process to fail, leading to many cases of infertility. Despite the importance of this critical stage, scientists haven't had a good way to explore what can go wrong, or even what must go right, after the newly formed ball of cells implants in the wall of the human uterus.
Administration/Government - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.08.2017
People with mental illness reoffend less if on specialty probation
People with mental illness reoffend less if on specialty probation
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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.08.2017
Patented biomedical implant could improve heart patient outcome
Over the course of a year, the average person's heart will beat nearly 40 million times. Stretched over a lifetime, that number often exceeds 2 billion.
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