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Physics/Materials Science



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Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
09:30
High voltage for tomorrow's particle accelerator
High voltage for tomorrow’s particle accelerator
On behalf of CERN, researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a high-tech device for the production of extremely precise, high voltage pulses that could be used in the next generation of particle accelerators.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.05.2017
Speeding up quality control for biologics
Speeding up quality control for biologics
Drugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other proteins, are being used to treat cancer, arthritis, and many other diseases. Monitoring the quality of these drugs has proven challenging, however, because protein production by living cells is much more difficult to control than the synthesis of traditional drugs.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
22.05.2017
Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies
Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies
Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
22.05.2017
Fundamentals drive UQ's new science Fellows
Fundamentals drive UQ’s new science Fellows
The thrill of fundamental discovery is a driving force for two University of Queensland professors who have today been named as new Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
19.05.2017
UW, GE Healthcare team up to improve medical imaging, patient outcomes
Sara John, an MRI research technologist at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, reviews research images from a GE MR scanner, in the Wisconsin Institute of Medical Research on campus.
Physics/Materials Science
18.05.2017
Even non-migratory birds use a magnetic compass
Even non-migratory birds use a magnetic compass
Not only migratory birds use a built-in magnetic compass to navigate correctly. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that non-migratory birds also are able to use a built-in compass to orient themselves using the Earth's magnetic field. The researchers behind the current study have received help from a group of zebra finches to study the magnetic compass of what are known as resident birds, that is, species that do not migrate according to the season.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
18.05.2017
Introducing the new Wright Lab, where physics takes on the universe’s biggest questions
Professor Sarah Demers spoke about "Physics with ATLAS,"and Professor Paul Tipton about "Upgrading the World's Largest Collider Experiment.
Physics/Materials Science
18.05.2017
World’s most sensitive dark matter detector releases first results
XENON1T installation in the underground hall of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The three story building on the right houses various auxiliary systems. The cryostat containing the LXeTPC is located inside the large water tank on the left. Scientists behind XENON1T, the largest dark matter experiment of its kind ever built, are encouraged by early results, describing them as the best so far in the search for dark matter.
Physics/Materials Science - Astronomy
18.05.2017
XENON1T: the most sensitive detector on Earth
Dark matter is one of the basic constituents of the Universe, five times more abundant than ordinary matter.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
17.05.2017
Cutting Down on Cancer Surgeries
Cutting Down on Cancer Surgeries
Engineers at the Optical Imaging Laboratory led by Caltech's Lihong Wang have developed an imaging technology that could help surgeons removing breast cancer lumps confirm that they have cut out the entire tumor?reducing the need for additional surgeries.  About 300,000 new cases of invasive breast cancer are discovered annually.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
17.05.2017
Group develops way to shape pulses of intense infrared light
To capture fast-moving action in a dimly lit environment, a photographer will use the combination of a fast shutter speed and a quick burst of light.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
16.05.2017
Butterfly wings inspire invention that opens door to new solar technologies
There's a whole bunch of potential new applications using our light-control technique, including next-generation solar cell, architectural and stealth technologies.
Physics/Materials Science
16.05.2017
Persistent and curious
Persistent and curious
As Professor of Particle Physics, Felicitas Pauss played a key role in the discovery of the Higgs boson.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
15.05.2017
The future's bright, the future's OLED
The future’s bright, the future’s OLED
Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) will soon show our world in a new light: the days of small light sources are numbered; in future, entire walls, ceilings, façades and car exteriors will light up our lives.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
15.05.2017
Self-healing tech charges up performance for silicon-containing battery anodes
Self-healing tech charges up performance for silicon-containing battery anodes
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers at the University of Illinois have found a way to apply self-healing technology to lithium-ion batteries to make them more reliable and last longer. The group developed a battery that uses a silicon nanoparticle composite material on the negatively charged side of the battery and a novel way to hold the composite together – a known problem with batteries that contain silicon.
Careers/Employment - Physics/Materials Science
12.05.2017
Electroplating delivers high-energy, high-power batteries
Electroplating delivers high-energy, high-power batteries
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — The process that makes gold-plated jewelry or chrome car accents is now making powerful lithium-ion batteries. Researchers at the University of Illinois, Xerion Advanced Battery Corporation and Nanjing University in China developed a method for electroplating lithium-ion battery cathodes, yielding high-quality, high-performance battery materials that could also open the door to flexible and solid-state batteries.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
12.05.2017
Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time
Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel's Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results Advances. Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds.
Physics/Materials Science
12.05.2017
Royal Society elects UQ physicist as a Fellow
Royal Society elects UQ physicist as a Fellow
University of Queensland School of Mathematics and Physics quantum physics researcher Emeritus Professor Gerard Milburn has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
11.05.2017
Scientists publish first comprehensive map of proteins within cells
Scientists publish first comprehensive map of proteins within cells
The first analysis of how proteins are arranged in a cell has been , revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell.  We have created the most detailed map of how proteins are arranged in a cell Kathryn Lilley Using the Sweden-based Cell Atlas, researchers examined the spatial distribution of the human proteome (the entire complement of proteins that make up the human body) that correspond to the majority of protein-coding genes.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
11.05.2017
A cheaper, greener way to grow crystalline semiconductor films
ANN ARBOR?University of Michigan chemists have developed a greener, cheaper way to make single-crystalline semiconductor films, components at the heart of all of our electric gadgetry.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
11.05.2017
Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesign
Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesign
Researchers have uncovered the exact mechanism that causes new solar cells to break down in air, paving the way for a solution. Solar cells harness energy from the Sun and provide an alternative to non-renewable energy sources like fossil fuels. However, they face challenges from costly manufacturing processes and poor efficiency - the amount of sunlight converted to useable energy.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
11.05.2017
Mathematics - Physics/Materials Science
11.05.2017
Illuminating uncertainty
Illuminating uncertainty
How does today's weather compare with what was forecast a week or even a day ago? Is that torrential Nor‘easter that was predicted in fact just a light drizzle' Has the sun, projected to emerge from the clouds at 11 a.m.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
10.05.2017
Laser-Induced Sound Waves Provide Live Panoramic Views of Tissue Functions
Laser-Induced Sound Waves Provide Live Panoramic Views of Tissue Functions
Medical engineers at the Optical Imaging Laboratory led by Caltech's Lihong Wang are now able to take a live look at the inner workings of a small animal with enough resolution to see active organs, flowing blood, circulating melanoma cells, and firing neural networks.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
10.05.2017
Scientists Help Thin-Film Ferroelectrics Go Extreme
Scientists Help Thin-Film Ferroelectrics Go Extreme
Scientists have greatly expanded the range of functional temperatures for ferroelectrics, a key material used in a variety of everyday applications, by creating the first-ever polarization gradient in a thin film. The achievement, reported May 10 in  Nature Communications by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), paves the way for developing devices capable of supporting wireless communications in extreme environments, from inside nuclear reactors to Earth's polar regions.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
10.05.2017
Scientists Print Nanoscale Imaging Probe onto Tip of Optical Fiber
A new process called fiber nanoimprinting is accelerating the fabrication of nano-optical devices, such as this pyramid-shaped Campanile probe imprinted on an optical fiber (captured in a scanning electron microscope image). The gold layer is added after imprinting. The gap at the top is 70 nanometers wide.
Physics/Materials Science
09.05.2017
Building a better microscope?
A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy. This lens, which can be designed for any liquid, may provide a cost-effective and easy-to-manufacture alternative to the expensive, centuries-old technique of hand polishing lenses for immersion objectives.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
09.05.2017
Future Shines Bright for Space Science Intern Zachary Raha
Future Shines Bright for Space Science Intern Zachary Raha
Zachary Raha was the kind of kid who always had a side project. ‘I would make maps of my house, my neighborhood, and the park on giant sheets of sketch paper my parents gave me,' he recalled.
Physics/Materials Science - Administration/Government
09.05.2017
Prospects for nuclear disarmament in uncertain times
Prospects for nuclear disarmament in uncertain times
From rising tensions on the Korean Peninsula to questions about the future of the Iran nuclear agreement, the specter of nuclear conflict has returned as a concern for policymakers and citizens alike.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
09.05.2017
Sweet compounds aid water retention in dry soil
Cellular sugar boosts nutrient and water retention, as this image unveils the complex interactions in clay soil crevices.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
09.05.2017
Researchers develop transistors that can switch between two stable energy states
Researchers develop transistors that can switch between two stable energy states
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Engineers are unveiling an upgrade to the transistor laser that could be used to boost computer processor speeds – the formation of two stable energy states and the ability to switch between them quickly.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
09.05.2017
New materials bring quantum computing closer to reality
Quantum computing could outsmart current computing for complex problem solving, but only if scientists figure out how to make it practical.
Physics/Materials Science - Environment/Sustainable Development
09.05.2017
ANU works with China and other superpowers on fusion energy
We are focusing on fusion materials research and plasma diagnostic development, to better understand how containment materials behave in the extreme environment of a fusion reactor.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
08.05.2017
Quartz powder for the battery of the future
Quartz powder for the battery of the future
The invisible becomes visible within lithium-sulphur batteries Materials researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland have, in collaboration with the Université Grenoble Alpes (France), developed a method that could enable a breakthrough for the lithium-sulphur battery. In theory, lithium-sulphur batteries can deliver considerably more energy than today's conventional lithium-ion batteries, but current prototypes show a distinct loss of capacity after just a few charging cycles.
Physics/Materials Science - Business/Economics
08.05.2017
University welcomes £38m Compound Semiconductor deal
Nearly £38m is being invested in a new Foundry for Compound Semiconductor (CS) technologies by the ten councils in the Cardiff Capital Region City Deal.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
08.05.2017
High-temperature devices made from films that bend as they ‘breathe'
High-temperature devices made from films that bend as they ‘breathe’
Carrying out maintenance tasks inside a nuclear plant puts severe strains on equipment, due to extreme temperatures that are hard for components to endure without degrading. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have come up with a radically new way to make actuators that could be used in such extremely hot environments.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
05.05.2017
Shining Light Deep into the Brain
Shining Light Deep into the Brain
To map the inner workings of the living brain, scientists have long employed various types of brain probes, beginning with simple electrical wires and moving on, in the past two decades, to advanced multi-electrode arrays.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
04.05.2017
A magic hood for artificial heart pumps
A magic hood for artificial heart pumps
Ten million people in Europe alone suffer from cardiac insufficiency, or a weak heart. One day, many of them may require a heart transplant.
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
04.05.2017
Sustainable biomedical textiles for the
Sustainable biomedical textiles for the
The textile and clothing industry has a long history in Switzerland. In order to remain competitive in the international market, the industry relies on innovations.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
04.05.2017
Making a valuable resource usable with water
Making a valuable resource usable with water
New reaction for converting methane into methanol In oil extraction sites, gaseous methane is simply burned, even though it could actually be a useful precursor material for fuels and products of the chemical industry. One way to make methane usable is to convert it to methanol. Being liquid, methanol is easier to transport than methane, and it can be used both as fuel and as raw material for the chemical industry.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
03.05.2017
Materials in a digitalized world
We hope to lead you on a gripping journey through the world of research and innovation; you may be surprised at how broad the term «applied research» is defined at Empa.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
03.05.2017
FIONA to Take on the Periodic Table's Heavyweights
FIONA to Take on the Periodic Table’s Heavyweights
New device at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron is designed to measure the mass number of superheavy, human-made elements A new tool at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) will be taking on some of the periodic table's latest heavyweight champions to see how their masses measure up to predictions.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
02.05.2017
Four Yale professors elected to National Academy of Sciences
Professors Robert Crabtree, Nicholas Read, Karen Seto, and Daniel Spielman have been elected to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
02.05.2017
Sodium and magnesium to replace lithium
Sodium and magnesium to replace lithium
Scientists supported by the SNSF have produced novel electrolytes for rechargeable sodium and magnesium batteries. The research group's objective was to develop alternatives to lithium-ion technology. A project supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) aims to find new materials which can be used in rechargeable batteries and eventually provide alternatives to the current lithium batteries.
Careers/Employment - Physics/Materials Science
02.05.2017
Roelofs takes director role at Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies
Roelofs takes director role at Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies
Noted physicist Andreas Roelofs is the new director of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT).
Careers/Employment - Physics/Materials Science
01.05.2017
Berkeley Lab Names Peter Fiske Director of Water-Energy Resilience Institute
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has tapped Peter Fiske to be the director of its Water-Energy Resilience Institute , a new position that underscores the Lab's commitment to developing solutions for the challenges associated with the interdependence of water and energy systems. Fiske will join Berkeley Lab on May 15.
Earth Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
01.05.2017
Earthquakes Can Make Thrust Faults Open Violently and Snap Shut
Earthquakes Can Make Thrust Faults Open Violently and Snap Shut
It is a common trope in disaster movies: an earthquake strikes, causing the ground to rip open and swallow people and cars whole. The gaping earth might make for cinematic drama, but earthquake scientists have long held that it does not happen. Except, it can, according to new experimental research from Caltech.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
01.05.2017
Collaboration yields promising innovation in stain resistance
Samples of cloth both untreated, left, and treated with a fluorine-free oleophobic coating developed in the labs of Emmanuel Giannelis, professor of materials science and engineering, and Jintu Fan, professor of fiber science & apparel design.
Mathematics - Physics/Materials Science
01.05.2017
The science behind making the perfect pitch
Baseball legend Satchel Paige, one of the greatest pitcher in the history of the sport, had a simple philosophy when it came to pitching: Keep the ball away from the bat.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
01.05.2017
New invasive clam in the U.S
New invasive clam in the U.S
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — They found it in the Illinois River near the city of Marseilles, Illinois, about 80 miles west of Lake Michigan – a strange entry point for an invasive Asian clam. The scientists who found it have no idea how it got there. But the discovery – along with genetic tests that confirm its uniqueness – means that a new species or “form” of invasive clam has made its official debut in North America.
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