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Psychology - Social Sciences - 04.12.2013
Bad relationships and the fear of being single
Ever wondered why your otherwise brilliant friends always seem to partner up with less-than-ideal mates? A new University of Toronto study could help explain why. Led by Stephanie Spielmann , a postdoctoral researcher in the psychology department, the study found that the fear of being single is a meaningful predictor of settling for less in relationships among both men and women.

Event - Psychology - 03.12.2013
Eye movements boost our memory
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have shown for the first time that our eye movements actively help us remember events. Where we focus our gaze can actively affect how successful we are in retrieving the right memory. WATCH VIDEO STORY The unique study used eye tracking technology to record three different scenarios.

Psychology - 29.11.2013
Lovely bubbly: price isn't everything with champagne
Expert wine tasters cannot tell which grapes are in sparkling wines when asked to taste them blind, an Oxford University-led study has found. And the champagnes they rated highly weren't always the most expensive, showing that you don't necessarily have to fork out when buying champers for your Christmas party.

Psychology - 27.11.2013
Sex abuse triggers early puberty and its problems
Puberty can be a tough time for all youth, but for girls who have been sexually abused, it spells double trouble. Sexually abused girls reach puberty before other girls, a new study finds, and early puberty increases their risk of having emotional problems. "Early maturing girls are already more vulnerable to mood problems than other kids, but this risk seems to be magnified for girls with histories of sexual abuse," said Jane Mendle, assistant professor of human development in Cornell's College of Human Ecology, whose study was published online (Aug.

Psychology - 25.11.2013
Study Examines Potential Evolutionary Role of "Sexual Regret" in Human Survival and Reproduction
AUSTIN, Texas — In the largest, most in-depth study to date on regret surrounding sexual activity, a team of psychology researchers found a stark contrast in remorse between men and women, potentially shedding light on the evolutionary history of human nature. Researchers for the peer-reviewed study included University of Texas at Austin evolutionary psychologist David Buss.

Health - Psychology - 22.11.2013
Steroid injections for premature babies linked to mental health risk
Steroid injections for premature babies linked to mental health risk
Steroid injections given to pregnant women before premature birth may increase the child's risk of later behavioural difficulties, a study has found. Mothers who are expected to give birth prematurely are often given an infusion of glucocorticoids, which mimic the natural hormone cortisol. This treatment is vital for helping the baby's lungs mature, but the new research suggests it may also increase the risk of mental health problems including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Health - Psychology - 20.11.2013
New partnership to focus on breakthroughs for mental health disorders
Institute of Health and Wellbeing Prof Andrew Gumley Dr Peter Uhlhaas A collaborative research network being launched today (20 November) is aiming to establish the city of Glasgow as a leading centre for research into the causes and treatment of psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Psychology - 18.11.2013
Speaker: Disrespect affects well-being and work
Feeling a bit disrespected at work? Columbia University Professor Adam Galinsky says that could be a major factor affecting workplace happiness and productivity. Galinsky was this year's ILR School Experimental Psychology and Organizations (ExPO) Lab distinguished speaker. ExPO, housed in ILR's Ives Hall and operated by the Department of Organizational Behavior, focuses on producing experimental organizational psychology research.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 12.11.2013
Personal reflection triggers increased brain activity during depressive episode
12 Nov 2013 Research by the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester has found that people experiencing depressive episodes display increased brain activity when they think about themselves. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain imaging technologies, scientists found that people experiencing a depressive episode process information about themselves in the brain differently to people who are not depressed.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 12.11.2013
Personal reflection triggers increased brain activity in depressive episodes
12 Nov 2013 Research by the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester has found that people experiencing depressive episodes display increased brain activity when they think about themselves. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain imaging technologies, scientists found that people experiencing a depressive episode process information about themselves in the brain differently to people who are not depressed.

Health - Psychology - 08.11.2013
Adolescents take twice as long as adults to get treatment for psychosis
Adolescents take twice as long as adults to get treatment for psychosis
Under-18s who experience psychosis go untreated after their first psychotic symptoms for twice as long as adults, according to new research. Psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions, are a feature of several disorders of mental health, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists recognise that starting medication for psychosis early greatly improves the chances of a successful outcome, but the study reveals that teenagers are much less likely than adults to get timely access to mental health services and appropriate drug treatment.

Psychology - Health - 06.11.2013
Calm in the Storm
A new study by a UM researcher and others shows meditation therapies can help incarcerated youth. By Marie Guma-Diaz and Annette Gallagher UM News MIAMI, Fla. (November 06, 2013) — More than 100,000 youth are held in prisons, jails, and juvenile detention centers across the United States. Research has shown that the development and persistence of antisocial behavior prevalent among youth offenders is the result of an ongoing interplay between psychosocial adversity and deficits in cognitive control processes, particularly attention.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 04.11.2013
Wives matter more when it comes to calming down marital conflicts
Marriage can be a battlefield. But a new study conducted at UC Berkeley has found that, when it comes to keeping the peace, it's more important for wives than for husbands to calm down after a heated argument. While both spouses were equally able to cool down during conflicts, the husbands' emotional regulation had little or no bearing on long-term marital satisfaction, according to the study's findings published online Nov.

Health - Psychology - 04.11.2013
Improving access to primary care mental health services for under-served groups
04 Nov 2013 A study by researchers from the universities of Liverpool and Manchester has identified ways to improve how older people and ethnic minority populations access mental health care services. As part of the `Improving Access to Mental Health in Primary Care' programme, researchers sought to identify why two underserved groups in four areas of Liverpool and Manchester had not been using mental health services that were available and what measure could address this.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 30.10.2013
A first step in learning by imitation, baby brains respond to another's actions
A first step in learning by imitation, baby brains respond to another’s actions
Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery for adults, but for babies it's their foremost tool for learning. As renowned people-watchers, babies often observe others demonstrate how to do things and then copy those body movements. It's how little ones know, usually without explicit instructions, to hold a toy phone to the ear or guide a spoon to the mouth.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 30.10.2013
Genes predispose some people to focus on the negative
Some people are genetically predisposed to see the world darkly, according to a study from the laboratory of a researcher now on the faculty of Cornell's College of Human Ecology. Adam K. Anderson, associate professor of human development, is continuing his research on emotions, genetics and perception, which began at his laboratory at the University of Toronto in collaboration with scientists at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

Health - Psychology - 30.10.2013
Improving access to mental health services
A study by researchers from the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester has identified ways to improve how older people and ethnic minority populations access mental health care services. As part of the `Improving Access to Mental Health in Primary Care' programme, researchers sought to identify why two underserved groups, in four areas of Liverpool and Manchester, had not been using mental health services and what measures could be taken to address this.

Psychology - 23.10.2013
New research supports theory that women are better multi-taskers
New research from a team of psychologists supports the popular perception that women are better at multitasking than men. Although many people believe that women are better than men at carrying out multiple tasks at the same time, the amount of research carried out to test the hypothesis is extremely limited.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 22.10.2013
Transforming lives of children and young people in care
An innovative new study has been announced aiming to explore and develop new ways of positively transforming the life chances of children and young people in care in Wales over the next 10 years. Commissioned by the Big Lottery Fund, the study could also pave the way for a new 5 million investment which could dramatically improve the outcomes of children in care in Wales.

Psychology - 16.10.2013
Chimpanzees and yawn contagion
New research from Lund University, Sweden, has shown for the first time that chimpanzees catch yawns from humans, and that the susceptibility to contagious yawning develops gradually with age just like it does in humans. VIDEO STORY While juvenile chimpanzees (5-8 years of age) catch human yawns, infant chimpanzees seem immune to yawn contagion.
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