Physics - Aug 22
Physics
The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, recently an international team of researchers led by physicists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences as well as the University of Queensland (AUS) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (USA) have combined the key elements of the two theories describing the flow of time and discovered that temporal order between events can exhibit genuine quantum features.
Life Sciences - Aug 21
Life Sciences

Scientists study individuals who lived during the Migration Period Led by Ron Pinhasi from the University of Vienna, Austria and Mario Novak from the Institute for Anthropological Research in Zagre

Life Sciences - Aug 21
Life Sciences

Fiddler crabs see the polarisation of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator.

Computer Science - Aug 21

Over three-quarters of today's internet traffic comes from streaming video, a number that is only projected to rise over time. To meet this demand, internet service providers offer consumers faster data speeds at premium prices, with gigabit-per-second tiers available in some areas.

History - Aug 21
History

Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation.

Innovation - Aug 21

Matchmaking is now the primary job of online algorithms, according to new research from Stanford sociologist Michael Rosenfeld. His new study shows that most heterosexual couples today meet online. Algorithms, and not friends and family, are now the go-to matchmaker for people looking for love, Stanford sociologist Michael Rosenfeld has found.

Earth Sciences - Aug 21

Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks' pores. The Earth's subsurface is an extremely active place, where the movements and friction of plates deep underground shape our landscape and govern the intensity of hazards above.

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