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Veterinary Science - Life Sciences
18.08.2017
Calves should receive more pain relief during husbandry procedures, researchers find
Calves may not be receiving the right level of pain relief when undergoing routine animal husbandry procedures including castration and disbudding, new research has found. The study from The University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science , published in the Vet Record , found that despite being recognised as being as painful as other procedures, calf husbandry procedures were significantly less likely to include the use of analgesics such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in addition to the local anaesthetic that is routinely used.
History/Archeology - Social Sciences
18.08.2017
Archaeologists uncover ancient trading network in Vietnam
This isn't a case of people producing a couple of extra items on top of what they need. It's a major operation. A team of archaeologists from ANU has uncovered a vast trading network which operated in Vietnam from around 4,500 years ago up until around 3,000 years ago. A new study shows a number of settlements along the Mekong Delta region of Southern Vietnam were part of a sophisticated scheme where large volumes of items were manufactured and circulated over hundreds of kilometres.
Astronomy
17.08.2017
Scientists help solve mystery of what causes exploding stars
This discovery gives weight to a theory that a white dwarf star devours material from its giant star companion until the white dwarf explodes as a supernova. Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) and overseas have helped to solve the mystery of what causes exploding stars, which are used to measure the accelerating expansion of the Universe.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.08.2017
Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggers
Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggers
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Vienna have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly. Bacteria have to watch out for amoeba.
Life Sciences
17.08.2017
How we recall the past
How we recall the past
When we have a new experience, the memory of that event is stored in a neural circuit that connects several parts of the hippocampus and other brain structures. Each cluster of neurons may store different aspects of the memory, such as the location where the event occurred or the emotions associated with it.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.08.2017
Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them, researchers report
Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them, researchers report
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered a mechanism that allows bacteria of the same species to communicate when their survival is threatened. The study suggests that it may be possible to slow dangerous infections by manipulating the messages these microbes send to each other, allowing the body to defeat an infection without causing the bacteria to develop resistance to the treatment.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
17.08.2017
More than just spilling the beans
More than just spilling the beans
Because of their high nitrogen content, spent coffee grounds are a popular garden fertilizer. Recycled in this manner, they already contribute to an environmentally friendly waste management. But they have the potential to deliver much more: a new procedure developed at the PSI allows high quality methane to be formed from spent coffee grounds.
Computer Science/Telecom
17.08.2017
Using a camera to spot and track drones
Using a camera to spot and track drones
EPFL researchers have shown that a simple camera can detect and track flying drones. Plus, the lightweight, energy-efficient and inexpensive technology could be installed directly on the drones themselves and enhance safety in the skies. The rising number of drones in air space poses numerous challenges.
Life Sciences - Agronomy/Food Science
17.08.2017
Researchers unlock cheesemaking secret
Researchers unlock cheesemaking secret
Researchers say their new knowledge on the inner workings of a bacterium has important implications for Australia's billion dollar cheese industry. University of Queensland School of Agriculture and Food Sciences researcher Associate Professor Mark Turner said a discovery by a UQ, Columbia University and University of Washington research group had explained the regulation of an enzyme in the bacterium Lactococcus, which is used as a starter culture in cheese production.
Careers/Employment
17.08.2017
Animation made easy
Animation made easy
Researchers from ETH Zurich and Disney Research have developed a software that makes it easier to animate characters in the entertainment industry.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.08.2017
Children who skip breakfast may not be getting recommended nutrients
A study by researchers at King's College London has found that children who skip breakfast regularly may not be consuming the daily amounts of key nutrients for growth and development that are recommended by the UK government. Children who ate breakfast every day were deemed to have overall superior nutritional profiles compared to those who didn't.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
17.08.2017
Whales turn tail at ocean mining noise
Whales turn tail at ocean mining noise
A new international study has measured the effect of loud sounds on migrating humpback whales as concern grows as oceans become noisier. University of Queensland School of Veterinary Science 's Dr Rebecca Dunlop said one of the main sources of ocean noise was oil and gas exploration, due to geologists firing off loud acoustic air guns to probe the structure of the ocean floor in search of fossil fuels.
Life Sciences
16.08.2017
When collecting bird sperm, method matters
When collecting bird sperm, method matters
Different methods of collecting bird sperm produce different sperm lengths, potentially affecting the conclusions of fertility studies. Scientists who are studying fertility in birds often use sperm length as an indicator of reproductive success. In birds, sperm length is a measure of how well the sperm can swim, and therefore their chance of success.
Computer Science/Telecom - Business/Economics
16.08.2017
In a step toward fighting human trafficking, sex ads are linked to Bitcoin data
In a step toward fighting human trafficking, sex ads are linked to Bitcoin data
!- Start of DoubleClick Floodlight Tag: Please do not remove Activity name of this tag: UCB001CP Retargeting URL of the webpage where the tag is expected to be placed: http://unknown This tag must be placed between the A UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate has developed the first automated techniques to identify adult ads tied to human trafficking rings by linking the ads to public information from Bitcoin - the primary payment method for online sex ads.
Life Sciences - Environment/Sustainable Development
16.08.2017
Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related
Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related
The documentary " Chasing Coral ,” released on Netflix in July, is a cinematic warning about how the bleaching of coral reefs may foreshadow how these marine animals will respond to climate change. Corals are key to ocean health because they support the densest, most diverse ecosystems - harboring species from turtles to algae to reef fish.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
16.08.2017
Potential new state of matter
Potential new state of matter
Research is showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. "These heavy fermion materials have a different hierarchy of energy scales than is found in transition metal and organic materials, but they often have similar complex and intertwined physics coupling spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom." Common phenomenon could be key to understanding mechanism of unconventional superconductivity LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
'Twinkling' enzymes could light the way to better cancer drugs
’Twinkling’ enzymes could light the way to better cancer drugs
A new test to show the properties of biologically important enzymes could help to streamline development of new treatments. “Twinkle, twinkle, little kinase. How I wonder what form you are…” It may not make for the best nursery rhyme, but an approach that sees proteins ‘twinkle' like stars in the night sky is providing new insight into an important class of enzymes involved in disease.
Careers/Employment - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
UW professor Franziska Roesner named one of world's top innovators under 35
UW professor Franziska Roesner named one of world’s top innovators under 35
MIT Technology Review has named University of Washington professor Franziska Roesner one of 35 "Innovators Under 35” for 2017 . Roesner is a faculty member in the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and co-director of the school's Security and Privacy Laboratory. Roesner's research spans a number of projects related to privacy and security in emerging technologies.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
Study examines feeding frenzy behavior in certain worms | UChicago News
The C. elegans roundworm sees by eating, sucking in big gulps of bacteria to learn about its surrounding environment. As researchers watched, they noticed an odd pattern marked by "bursts" of eating. UChicago scientists in a new study use a mathematical model to explain such eating bursts. The findings, published Aug.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.08.2017
Starting opioid addiction treatment in the ED is cost-effective, says study | YaleNews
The most cost-effective treatment for people with untreated opioid addiction who visit the emergency department (ED) is buprenorphine, a medication to reduce drug cravings and withdrawal, say Yale researchers. Their study found that among patients who came to the ED, the ED-initiated medication strategy was most likely to be cost-effective compared to referral alone or a brief intervention with facilitated referral, the researchers said.
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