news 2017


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Life Sciences - Chemistry
20.10.2017
New function in gene-regulatory protein discovered
Researchers at UmeŚ and Stockholm universities in Sweden and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US have published a new study in the journal Molecular Cell. In the article, they show how the protein CBP affects the expression of genes through its interaction with the basal machinery that reads the instructions in our DNA.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.10.2017
Researchers call for better Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome diagnosis
Young women's inconsistent perceptions around their diagnosis of the hormonal condition Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) could be causing them unwarranted concern about their fertility, new research has found. The study was Australia's first to quantify PCOS in women aged 16-29 and recruited participants via Facebook.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.10.2017
Treating depression: an expert discusses risks, benefits of ketamine
Up to a third of patients with depression don't respond to traditional forms of treatment. For those patients, the dark fog that hovers over their lives feels like it will never lift. But a new treatment called ketamine has recently made waves all over the internet. Hailed as a "miracle drug" and the first major antidepressant breakthrough in three decades, ketamine has improved the lives of many patients whose depression had dominated their lives for years.
Law/Forensics - Literature/Linguistics
19.10.2017
100 years on, poet’s "bloodless death" mystery solved
The famed “bloodless death” of a landmark British poet in the Great War has been investigated by experts from the Humanities and Sciences a century after his death, in a new project undertaken at Cardiff University. Biographical and critical works about Edward Thomas (1878 - 1917) often refer to his “bloodless death”, a story that emerged following his death aged just 39 at the Battle of Arras on Easter Monday in 1917.
Arts and Design - Physics/Materials Science
19.10.2017
As black as ebony
As black as ebony
Like many tropical wood types, ebony is an endangered species that is tricky to use, such in in-strument manufacturing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.10.2017
Researchers target ’undruggable’ cancers
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable', has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia. The study published in Nature shows that two novel and specific small-molecule inhibitors developed by the research teams can bind to and deactivate an enzyme that controls the stability of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.10.2017
PET scans for Alzheimer's could bring benefit to more patients
PET scans for Alzheimer’s could bring benefit to more patients
An imaging tool honed to spot rogue proteins in the brain could benefit some patients with suspected Alzheimer's, according to a new study. The technique, called positron emission tomography (PET), is already used in hospitals to generate 3D images of organs and internal structures, helping doctors to spot signs of disease and confirm diagnoses.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Business/Economics
19.10.2017
A seemingly symbolic action shifted the climate change debate
ANN ARBOR-On the face of it, environmentalist Bill McKibben's international climate campaign to have universities divest fossil fuel assets had limited success. Only a handful of institutions pledged to divest and it didn't affect the stocks of fossil fuel companies. But a new study by University of Michigan sustainable enterprise professor Andy Hoffman and Temple University's Todd Schifeling, a former postdoc with U-M's Erb and Graham institutes, shows McKibben's activism might have been successful in another way.
Earth Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
19.10.2017
Hydroelectric power plants have to be adapted for climate change
Hydroelectric power plants have to be adapted for climate change
Of all the electricity produced in Switzerland, 56% comes from hydropower. The life span of hydroelectric plants, which are massive and expensive to build and maintain, is measured in decades, yet the rivers and streams they depend on and the surrounding environment are ever-changing.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.10.2017
Lower brain glucose levels found in people with obesity, type 2 diabetes
Glucose levels are reduced in the brains of individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes compared to lean individuals, according to a new Yale study. The finding might explain disordered eating behavior - and even a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease - among obese and diabetic individuals, the researchers said.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Business/Economics
19.10.2017
Road charges could ease Melbourne’s gridlock, research shows
Charging drivers at peak times could be the best way to help ease Melbourne's traffic woes, according to new research by the University of Melbourne. In a working paper,† Can Road Changes Alleviate Congestion , researchers Dr Leslie Martin and Mr Sam Thornton, from the Faculty of Business and Economics, analysed the economic and social impact of different charges levied on road use in Victoria.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
18.10.2017
Petals produce a 'blue halo' to help bees find flowers
Petals produce a ’blue halo’ to help bees find flowers
New study finds "messy" microscopic structures on petals of some flowers manipulate light to produce a blue colour effect that is easily seen by bee pollinators. Researchers say these petal grooves evolved independently multiple times across flowering plants, but produce the same result: a floral halo of blue-to-ultraviolet light.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.10.2017
Female Immune Cells Keep Their Second X Chromosome Shut Off
Female Immune Cells Keep Their Second X Chromosome Shut Off
Autoimmune diseases tend to strike women more than men and having multiple X chromosomes could be the main reason why. While a process called X chromosome inactivation serves to balance out gene dosage between males and females, some genes on the "inactive X" chromosome in immune cells can sometimes escape this process, giving women an extra dose of immunity-related gene expression.
Social Sciences - Sport Sciences
18.10.2017
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection
Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection
The gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research. The study, published today in Scientific Reports and funded by the European Research Council, tested the impact of a slow, affectionate touch against a fast, neutral touch following social rejection and found a specific relationship between gentle touch and social bonding.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.10.2017
Gene therapy can cure lameness in horses, research finds
Injecting DNA into injured horse tendons and ligaments can cure lameness, new research involving scientists at Kazan Federal University , Moscow State Academy and The University of Nottingham has found. The gene therapy technology was used in horses that had gone lame due to injury and within two to three weeks the horses were able to walk and trot.
Life Sciences - Social Sciences
18.10.2017
Exploring why some primates have bigger brains
Exploring why some primates have bigger brains
The accepted view of why some primates, including apes and humans, have evolved to have large brains is contested in new research from the Department of Anthropology. The study also questions whether brain size is a useful indicator of cognitive ability. Brain size and behaviour The research project, led by PhD student Lauren Powell, and published in Royal Society's Proceedings B journal , has found little evidence to support a long-held view that larger brains have developed to help primates cope with increasingly complex social structures - known as the Social Brain Hypothesis.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.10.2017
Possible new immune therapy target in lung cancer
Possible new immune therapy target in lung cancer
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) A study from Bern University Hospital in collaboration with the University of Bern shows that so-called perivascular-like cells from lung tumors behave abnormally. They not only inadequately support vascular structures, but also may actively modulate the inflammatory and immune response.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
18.10.2017
Petals produce a 'blue halo' that helps bees find flowers
Petals produce a ’blue halo’ that helps bees find flowers
New study finds "messy" microscopic structures on petals of some flowers manipulate light to produce a blue colour effect that is easily seen by bee pollinators. Researchers say these petal grooves evolved independently multiple times across flowering plants, but produce the same result: a floral halo of blue-to-ultraviolet light.
Business/Economics
18.10.2017
Families pass on disadvantage, finds world-first welfare analysis
Almost two decades of Australian welfare payment data paints a picture of disadvantage, as researchers find children of parents on benefits are almost twice as likely to receive benefits too by their early 20s.† †† An extensive study of welfare payments to more than 100,000 Australians has provided comprehensive evidence that young people are almost twice as likely to receive welfare by their early 20s, if their parents have also received benefits.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
18.10.2017
Rapid environmental change makes species more vulnerable to extinction
Rapid environmental change makes species more vulnerable to extinction
When species interact with each other, they do not evolve separately, but do so together. This process is called coevolution. Natural selection favors predators that are better at capturing prey, and it favors prey with better defenses for escaping predators. Among mutualistic biological communities, where two species mutually benefit from their relationship, natural selection favors, for example, plants that are better at being pollinated by insects as well as insects that are better at extracting pollen and nectar from flowers.
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