news 2018

Health - Dec 14
Health
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.
Life Sciences - Dec 14

Scientists at Stanford have solved a 50-year-old mystery that could open up new areas of research into muscle disorders.

Health - Dec 14

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Computer Science - Dec 14

Imperial scientists have created an algorithm to predict when specific cryptocoins are at risk of 'pump-and-dump' schemes.

Health - Dec 14
Health

Science + Technology - Developed by UCLA Engineering researchers, system is 'like a motion detector for the microscopic world' - Amy Akmal Scientists typically diagnose parasitic infections by scanning bodily fluid samples with optical microscopes.


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Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2018
Newly identified enzyme could play key role in childbirth, muscle diseases
Scientists at Stanford have solved a 50-year-old mystery that could open up new areas of research into muscle disorders. The study revealed a human enzyme that modifies muscle proteins to help them grow and remain strong. Facebook Twitter Email Since the 1960s, scientists have known of a modification that occurs to a particular molecule in muscles, especially after exercise.

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 14.12.2018
Cryptocurrency manipulation schemes could be found and foiled by new algorithm
Imperial scientists have created an algorithm to predict when specific cryptocoins are at risk of 'pump-and-dump' schemes. The algorithm could help market regulators predict and prevent cryptocurrency schemes that sees traders spend seven million US Dollars per month, only to find the price of their purchased currency falls as the scheme unfolds.

Health - Social Sciences - 14.12.2018
Pension plan improving mental health in China
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Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Artificial intelligence-based device detects moving parasites in bodily fluid for easier, earlier diagnosis
Artificial intelligence-based device detects moving parasites in bodily fluid for easier, earlier diagnosis
Science + Technology Developed by UCLA Engineering researchers, system is 'like a motion detector for the microscopic world' Amy Akmal Scientists typically diagnose parasitic infections by scanning bodily fluid samples with optical microscopes. But that conventional approach sometimes doesn't work — for example, if the concentration of parasites in the sample is too low, or if the microscope's imaging capabilities lack the sensitivity to detect disease early on.

Astronomy / Space Science - 14.12.2018
Young star caught forming around another star
A small star has been observed forming out of the dust surrounding a larger star, in a similar way to how planets are born. Astronomers were observing the formation of a massive young star, called MM 1a, when they discovered an unexpected object nearby. MM 1a is surrounded by rotating disc of gas and dust.

History / Archeology - 14.12.2018
Fifty years of decline in Queensland’s coastal sharks
Queensland's coastal shark numbers are continuing a 50-year decline, in sharp contradiction of suggestions of ‘exploding' shark populations, according to an analysis of Queensland Shark Control Program data. University of Queensland and Griffith University researchers analysed data from the program, which has used baited drumlines and nets since 1962 to minimise human-shark interactions, and now spans 1760 km of the Queensland coastline.

Health - 14.12.2018
Bisexual women most vulnerable to poor health and wellbeing
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) Australians continue to experience significant disadvantage when it comes to health and wellbeing compared to their heterosexual peers, a University of Queensland study has found. Dr Francisco Perales , of UQ's Institute for Social Science Research , identified bisexual people as being at higher risk of poor outcomes compared to both heterosexual and gay/lesbian people.

Health - Careers / Employment - 14.12.2018
Grand Challenges Explorations grant awarded for groundbreaking research in global health and development
Grand Challenges Explorations grant awarded for groundbreaking research in global health and development
The University of Melbourne was announced as a winner of a global Grand Challenges Explorations grant - an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Professor Muthupandian Ashokkumar along with Dr Francesca Cavalieri and Dr Srinivas Mettu will pursue an innovative global health and development research project, titled 'Edible Micro-Balloons for Nutrition Enhancement', aimed at relieving malnutrition among mothers and infants in developing countries.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Scientists identify method to study resilience to pain
Scientists at the Yale School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System have successfully demonstrated that it is possible to pinpoint genes that contribute to inter-individual differences in pain. Chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million people in the United States. Clinicians have long recognized that some people are more resilient to pain than others.

Environment - Administration - 13.12.2018
Mounting evidence justifies EPA’s regulation of greenhouse gases
Sixteen prominent climate scientists argue that there is more reason than ever for the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate greenhouse gases, at the same time some politicians are pushing the EPA to reverse its 2009 decision to do so. In a paper appearing in the Dec.

Physics - Transport - 13.12.2018
Invention promises airport security screening without queues
Invention promises airport security screening without queues
A research team led by The Australian National University (ANU) has invented a device that could be developed into ultra-sensitive cameras for security screening whichwould not require people to queue at airports. Other applications could include smaller and safer sensors for driverless vehicles. Lead researcher Dr Mingkai Liu said the research had already led to a proof-of-concept prototype device and provisional patent.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Genetic 'missing links' underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Genetic ’missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
UCLA researchers, in global collaboration, gain new understanding of brain architecture of autism, schizophrenia Sarah C.P. Williams Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases.

Physics - Materials Science - 13.12.2018
Team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale
Team invents method to shrink objects to the nanoscale
It's not quite the Ant-Man suit, but the system produces 3-D structures one thousandth the size of the originals. MIT researchers have invented a way to fabricate nanoscale 3-D objects of nearly any shape. They can also pattern the objects with a variety of useful materials, including metals, quantum dots, and DNA.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.12.2018
Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators
SLAC scientists find a new way to explain how a black hole's plasma jets boost particles to the highest energies observed in the universe. The results could also prove useful for fusion and accelerator research on Earth. Menlo Park, Calif. Magnetic field lines tangled like spaghetti in a bowl might be behind the most powerful particle accelerators in the universe.

Business / Economics - 13.12.2018
Study calls for stricter regulation of elusive rabbit breeding industry
Rabbits are one of the most popular pets in the UK and yet little is known about where these very cute and appealing animals come from. Now a new study by researchers at the Universities of Nottingham and Winchester has shed light on this elusive industry, calling for more to be done to regulate and improve the breeding of rabbits as pets.

Psychology - 13.12.2018
Government advice on mental health and behaviour in schools: Where is the evidence?
The quality of research into the impact of social and emotional learning (SEL) interventions in UK schools needs to improve in order for the programmes to be successful, says new research. The research , led by Professor Roisin Corcoran, Chair in Education at the University of Nottingham, and published in Educational Research Review , provides the first comprehensive review of the research into SEL interventions in the UK and United States over the last 50 years.

Environment - 13.12.2018
3 million for major research study into UK greenhouse gas emissions
3 million for major research study into UK greenhouse gas emissions
A study to develop new methods for evaluating the UK's greenhouse gas emissions using atmospheric observations has been awarded 3M by NERC. The project, led by researchers in Bristol's School of Chemistry, is vital for assessing climate change mitigation measures. Led by Dr Matthew Rigby , the study will deploy a new generation of greenhouse gas measurement techniques that will allow us to better determine emissions from different sectors of the economy.

Physics - Chemistry - 13.12.2018
Scientists design custom nanoparticles with new ’stencil’ method
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone Nano-sized particles already make bicycles and tennis rackets lighter and stronger, protect eyeglasses from scratches, and help direct chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. But their usefulness depends on being able to precisely sculpt them into the right configurations-no easy task when they're so tiny that thousands of them could fit into the thickness of a sheet of paper.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 13.12.2018
For a longer battery life: Pushing lithium ion batteries to the next performance level
For a longer battery life: Pushing lithium ion batteries to the next performance level
Conventional lithium ion batteries, such as those widely used in smartphones and notebooks, have reached performance limits. Materials chemist Freddy Kleitz from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna and international scientists have developed a new nanostructured anode material for lithium ion batteries, which extends the capacity and cycle life of the batteries.
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