news 2018

Life Sciences - Aug 17
17 August 2018 Bristol Vet School has been awarded two Innovate UK grants totalling nearly £160k for studies that aim to further our progress towards sustainable livestock production and improve broiler chicken welfare.
Medicine - Aug 17

Body mass index is positively associated with blood pressure, according to the ongoing study of 1.7 million Chinese men and women being conducted by researchers at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) and in China.

Life Sciences - Aug 17
Life Sciences

The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), of which INRA is a leading member, published the first wheat genome reference sequence in Science , on 17 August 2018.

Medicine - Aug 17
Medicine

Ryan Hatoum Children with severe disabilities, serious cognitive impairments and medically complex situations require more specialized health care during their lifetimes.

Astronomy - Aug 17

Some of the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are amongst the very first that formed in our Universe, physicists have found.


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Life Sciences - Environment - 17.08.2018
Innovate UK awards for studies into sustainable livestock production and improving chicken welfare
17 August 2018 Bristol Vet School has been awarded two Innovate UK grants totalling nearly £160k for studies that aim to further our progress towards sustainable livestock production and improve broiler chicken welfare. Dr Andy Butterworth , Reader in Farm Animal Science, will lead the 100K Bristol component of a 403k study entitled ‘Lighting for Broiler Enhanced Welfare and Commercial Output'.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 17.08.2018
As body mass index increases, blood pressure may as well
Body mass index is positively associated with blood pressure, according to the ongoing study of 1.7 million Chinese men and women being conducted by researchers at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) and in China. These findings appear in the Aug. 17 issue of JAMA Network Open.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Innovation / Technology - 17.08.2018
For children with complex medical situations, a new roadmap for improving health
For children with complex medical situations, a new roadmap for improving health
Ryan Hatoum Children with severe disabilities, serious cognitive impairments and medically complex situations require more specialized health care during their lifetimes. But establishing a consistent way to identify their overall health needs and measure progress in meeting those needs has been an elusive goal.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.08.2018
New perspectives to improve wheat: the reference sequence of wheat genome is finally a reality
New perspectives to improve wheat: the reference sequence of wheat genome is finally a reality
The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), of which INRA is a leading member, published the first wheat genome reference sequence in Science , on 17 August 2018. French research teams from INRA, CEA, and the universities of Clermont-Auvergne, Evry, Paris-Sud and Paris-Saclay contributed to the project, a scientific milestone due to the enormous complexity and size of the genome - five times larger than the human genome and forty times larger than the rice genome.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics / Materials Science - 17.08.2018
Physicists reveal oldest galaxies
Some of the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are amongst the very first that formed in our Universe, physicists have found. Findings by a team of academics, including physicists Professor Carlos Frenk and Dr Alis Deason from the Institute for Computational Cosmology (ICC) at Durham University and Dr Sownak Bose from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in America, suggest that galaxies including Segue-1, Bootes I, Tucana II and Ursa Major I are over 13 billion years old.

Life Sciences - 17.08.2018
Are our wild animals growing old gracefully?
Are our wild animals growing old gracefully?
For most of us, the body's deterioration is an unavoidable part of getting older. This age-related decline, known as "senescence", can occur subtly and slowly for some individuals, while for others it happens much faster. A researcher from The Australian National University is trying to find out why.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.08.2018
How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
The struggle for iron determines the fate of maize and insect pest: Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm, the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition.

Chemistry - Medicine / Pharmacology - 16.08.2018
When sulfur disappears without trace
When sulfur disappears without trace
Chemists from the University of Vienna finally find a surprisingly simple reaction to make a family of bioactive molecules Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif - in certain cases however their preparation poses a challange to organic chemists. In their most recent work, Nuno Maulide and his coworkers from the University of Vienna present a new route for these molecules.

Physics / Materials Science - 16.08.2018
Physicists fight laser chaos with quantum chaos to improve laser performance
To tame chaos in powerful semiconductor lasers, which causes instabilities, scientists have introduced another kind of chaos. High-powered semiconductor lasers are used in materials processing, biomedical imaging and industrial research, but the emitted light they produce is affected by instabilities, making it incoherent.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics / Materials Science - 16.08.2018
Astronomers Identify Some of the Earliest Galaxies in the Universe
Astronomers from Durham University and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have found evidence that the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are among the very first galaxies that formed in our Universe. The research group's results suggest that galaxies including Segue-1, Bootes I, Tucana II and Ursa Major I are, in fact, some of the first galaxies ever formed, thought to be over 13 billion years old.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 16.08.2018
Statins associated with improvement of rare lung disease
Statins associated with improvement of rare lung disease
In the first study of its kind, researchers have found that cholesterol-lowering statins may improve the conditions of people with a rare lung disease called autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The research also suggested that two new tests could help diagnose the condition. BACKGROUND Autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare syndrome affecting 1 in 150,000 people worldwide.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 16.08.2018
Manipulating how yeast cells work could lead to new medical treatments
When a stimulus descends upon a cell, it sets off a flurry of activity. Sensors on the surface take in information and relay it inside to other proteins, which perform computations and transmit their findings. The cell makes a decision and responds to the stimulus. Megan McClean wants to figure out how it all works and then manipulate the process - fundamental research with implications for identifying drug targets and designing medical treatments.

- 16.08.2018
Linking turnover to organizational performance: the role of process conformance
Introduction: Jan Wynen, Wouter Van Dooren, Jan Mattijs and Carl Deschamps investigated the optimal rate of turnover for organizational performance and the role for process conformance. The article 'Linking turnover to organizational performance: the role of process conformance' is published Open Access.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 16.08.2018
Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion
Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion
Administrative affairs Arts and entertainment Buildings and grounds For UW employees Health and medicine Honors and awards Official notices Politics and government UW and the community Humans' ability to notice moving objects has always been a useful skill, from avoiding an animal predator in ancient times to crossing a busy street in the modern world.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.08.2018
Anti-cancer drug offers potential alternative to transplant for patients with liver failure, study finds
16 August 2018 Patients suffering sudden liver failure could in the future benefit from a new treatment that could reduce the need for transplants, research published today shows. The study by scientists at University of Edinburgh MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute in Glasgow, and the University of Bristol, is published in Science Translational Medicine.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.08.2018
Coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef is on the rise
Coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef is on the rise
Coral bleaching across Australia's Great Barrier Reef has been occurring since the late 18 th century, new research shows. Coral bleaching Using cores taken from long-lived corals, scientists show that bleaching events have steadily affected more and more corals, and are happening more frequently than in the past, adding to existing concerns about the future of coral reefs.

Mechanical Engineering - Chemistry - 16.08.2018
3D Printing the Next Generation of Batteries
Rahul Panat, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, and a team of CMU researchers in collaboration with Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed a revolutionary new method of 3D printing battery electrodes that creates a 3D microlattice structure with controlled porosity.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 16.08.2018
India's excess fluoride in groundwater
India’s excess fluoride in groundwater
Fluoride occurs naturally in groundwater. In small amounts, this is usually not a problem, but in India the concentration in many places exceeds the threshold at which is starts to present a health hazard. According to estimates by Eawag researchers, based on new computer models, more than a hundred million people are affected.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.08.2018
Coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef is on the rise, new research reveals
Coral bleaching across Australia's Great Barrier Reef has been occurring since the late 18 th century, new research shows. Coral bleaching Using cores taken from long-lived corals, scientists show that bleaching events have steadily affected more and more corals, and are happening more frequently than in the past, adding to existing concerns about the future of coral reefs.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.08.2018
Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight
Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight
MIT scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quasar. The central quasar goes by the name PKS1353-341 and is intensely bright - so bright that for decades astronomers observing it in the night sky have assumed that the quasar was quite alone in its corner of the universe, shining out as a solitary light source from the center of a single galaxy.
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