news 2018

Astronomy Jun 19
Astronomy
NASA to test Sussex physicist's atomic bubble trap theory in space. For 18 years Professor Barry Garraway has wondered what might be revealed by his ‘atomic bubble trap' if it were ever to be created in a place without gravity.
Chemistry Jun 19

New University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing.

Physics Jun 19

A new Oxford University research collaboration could transform the design and development of a number of next generation materials, including thermoelectrics, which are used in products that support everyday life, capturing waste heat and recycling it into electricity.

Medicine Jun 19
Medicine

Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings.

Environment Jun 19
Environment

The study, published in Global Change Biology, is the first of its scope, encompassing a nine-year dataset sampling 10,000 trees across 22 million acres.


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Astronomy - Physics / Materials Science - 19.06.2018
NASA to test Sussex physicist's atomic bubble trap theory in space
NASA to test Sussex physicist’s atomic bubble trap theory in space
NASA to test Sussex physicist's atomic bubble trap theory in space For 18 years Professor Barry Garraway has wondered what might be revealed by his ‘atomic bubble trap' if it were ever to be created in a place without gravity. Now the University of Sussex quantum physicist is about to find out.

Chemistry - Physics / Materials Science - 19.06.2018
Game-changing finding pushes 3D printing to the molecular limit
New University of Nottingham research proves that advanced materials containing molecules that switch states in response to environmental stimuli such as light can be fabricated using 3D printing. The study findings have the potential to vastly increase the functional capabilities of 3D-printed devices for industries such as electronics, healthcare and quantum computing.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 19.06.2018
State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made
State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made
Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings. University of Bristol Press Release State of the art imaging challenges our understanding of how platelets are made Correlative light-electron microscopy is being used to increase our knowledge of how platelets are made in the body and the results are challenging previously held understandings.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 19.06.2018
Nano-scale ’vibrational wave’ research could revolutionise super materials
A new Oxford University research collaboration could transform the design and development of a number of next generation materials, including thermoelectrics, which are used in products that support everyday life, capturing waste heat and recycling it into electricity. A new Oxford University research collaboration could transform the design and development of a number of next generation materials, including thermoelectrics.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Study confirms beetles exploit warm winters to expand range
Study confirms beetles exploit warm winters to expand range
The study, published in Global Change Biology, is the first of its scope, encompassing a nine-year dataset sampling 10,000 trees across 22 million acres. Both competition and winter cold are known to be important causes of mortality, but no previous studies addressed how these mortality factors interact.

Astronomy - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
A dexterous laboratory
A dexterous laboratory
ESA Space in Images Have you ever considered yourself capable of manipulating gravity? When you grip an object, you are doing just that. Gravity is constantly exerting its force on objects, most notably by keeping everything weighed down. But when you lift a cup to your mouth, you are playing against gravity.

Psychology - Medicine / Pharmacology - 19.06.2018
Emotional eating in childhood is learned at home
Emotional eating in childhood is learned at home
The tendency for children to eat more or less when stressed and upset is mainly influenced by the home environment and not by genes, according to a new UCL-led study. The study, published today in Pediatric Obesity , found that genetics only play a small role in young children's emotional overeating and undereating, unlike other eating behaviours in childhood such as food fussiness.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Business / Economics - 19.06.2018
Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortages
Climate action can limit Asia’s growing water shortages
Even "modest" action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers. The study takes an inventive approach to modeling the effects of both climate change and economic growth on the world's most heavily populated continent.

Law / Forensics - Social Sciences - 19.06.2018
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Professor Clare McGlynn of Durham Law School tells how her research has helped to shape a law on upskirting and why more comprehensive legislation is needed to protect victims from all image-based sexual abuse. Moves to legislate against upskirting - the act of secretly taking a photograph under a victim's skirt - hit the headlines when a planned law to criminalise the act stalled in Parliament.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 19.06.2018
Is the sky the limit?
Is the sky the limit?
What stops a species adapting to an ever-wider range of conditions, continuously expanding its geographic range? The biomathematician Jitka Polechová, an Elise Richter Fellow at the University of Vienna, has published a paper in PLoS Biology which explains the formation of species' range margins. The theory shows that just two compound parameters, important for both ecology and evolution of species, are fundamental to the stability of their range: the environmental heterogeneity and the size of the local population.

Computer Science / Telecom - 19.06.2018
Researchers Use Machine Learning to Search Science Data
Researchers Use Machine Learning to Search Science Data
As scientific datasets increase in both size and complexity, the ability to label, filter and search this deluge of information has become a laborious, time-consuming and sometimes impossible task, without the help of automated tools. With this in mind, a team of researchers from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley are developing innovative machine learning tools to pull contextual information from scientific datasets and automatically generate metadata tags for each file.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Combining different malaria vaccines could reduce cases by 91 per cent
Using two experimental anti-malarial vaccines, which work in different ways, can greatly reduce the number of malaria infections in animal studies. Experimental vaccines, which independently achieve 48% and 68% reductions in malaria cases, can achieve 91% reduction when combined. Presently, each vaccine is at a different stage of human trials, and there have not been efforts to combine them.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Ovarian cancer cells switched off by ’unusual’ mechanism
Scientists at the Ovarian Cancer Action Research Centre at Imperial College London have discovered a mechanism that deactivates ovarian cancer cells. The findings, published in EMBO Reports , could lead to better treatments for women with ovarian cancer. The research has found a new mechanism for a protein named OPCML.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 19.06.2018
Trojan Horse: how a killer fungus unleashes meningitis
In a world first, University of Sydney researchers have revealed how a deadly fungus and primary cause of life-threatening meningitis exploits the immune system like a 'Trojan Horse' to promote infection. Published today in The American Journal of Pathology , the study was led by a team from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research and the Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Disease and Biosecurity of the University of Sydney.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.06.2018
New defense mechanism against oxygen radicals discovered
New defense mechanism against oxygen radicals discovered
Oxygen radicals occur as a by-product when living beings burn carbohydrates or fat. They are suspected of accelerating the ageing process in humans and animals, and to be partly responsible for severe illnesses such as Alzheimer's or certain types of cancer. Researchers at the University of Bern and the University of Stockholm have now discovered a so far unknown defense mechanism against oxygen radicals which could serve as a base for various medications.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 18.06.2018
Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrong
Everything big data claims to know about you could be wrong
When it comes to understanding what makes people tick - and get sick - medical science has long assumed that the bigger the sample of human subjects, the better. But new research led by UC Berkeley suggests this big-data approach may be wildly off the mark. That's largely because emotions, behavior and physiology vary markedly from one person to the next and one moment to the next.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 18.06.2018
Collecting bacterial communities from puddles helps solve ecosystem riddles
Researchers have used puddle ecosystems to start to unravel the roles different bacteria play in complex communities. Bacteria coat every surface on Earth, living in soil and water, and even inside other creatures including ourselves. They often play critical roles, such as helping us digest food or providing ‘ecosystem services' like decomposing dead plant matter and returning the nutrients to the soil.

Business / Economics - Astronomy - 18.06.2018
Checking China’s pollution by satellite
Air pollution has smothered China's cities in recent decades. In response, the Chinese government has implemented measures to clean up its skies. But are those policies effective? Now an innovative study co-authored by an MIT scholar shows that one of China's key antipollution laws is indeed working - but unevenly, with one particular set of polluters most readily adapting to it.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 18.06.2018
New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printing
New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printing
Scientists at the UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented a new way to synthesize DNA that promises to be easier and faster, does not require the use of toxic chemicals and is potentially more accurate. With greater accuracy, the technique could produce DNA strands 10 times longer than today's methods.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 18.06.2018
IReadMore app improves reading ability of stroke patients
IReadMore app improves reading ability of stroke patients
A new smart app designed to improve the reading ability of people who have suffered a stroke provides 'significant' improvements, a UCL study has found.  Developed by the Aphasia Lab (UCL Institute of Neurology), iReadMore provides computer-based reading therapy using written and spoken words and pictures, and aims to improve word-reading speed and accuracy.
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