news 2018

Innovation - Oct 18
Crowd density estimation provides organisers with valuable information. Festivals and other large-scale events attract many people, but organisers often lack insight into the number of people attending the event and their movements.
Life Sciences - Oct 18

Krill ' small crustaceans eaten by whales, seals and penguins ' play a vital role in removing carbon from the atmosphere, according to a new study. A study on how krill affect the Southern Ocean's ability to take in carbon from the atmosphere and bury it on the seafloor has revealed the small crustaceans play an outsized role in the process.

Career - Oct 18
Career

As part of its 50th anniversary celebration, EPFL is highlighting his commitment for open and reproducible research through an exceptional Open Science Day, today.

Health - Oct 18

Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Pharmacology - Oct 18

Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state.


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Life Sciences - Health - 31.12.2018
The glow of science
From gaseous jets shooting out the center of supermassive black holes to fluorescent tags elucidating the intricacies of the brain, science has a close relationship with light. As a multi-purpose tool, light can reveal hidden functions, magnify areas of interest, provide a means of measurement and trigger activity.

Physics - Materials Science - 31.12.2018
Physicists record "lifetime" of graphene qubits
First measurement of its kind could provide stepping stone to practical quantum computing. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, the "temporal coherence" of a graphene qubit - meaning how long it can maintain a special state that allows it to represent two logical states simultaneously.

Physics - Pharmacology - 31.12.2018
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2018
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community, from world-leading research to incredible innovations. Before 2019 is upon us, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views). Here are our top 10 stories of 2018.

Physics - 28.12.2018
Fermilab scientists lead quest to find elusive fourth kind of neutrino
Neutrinos, ghostly fundamental particles that are famously difficult to study, could provide scientists with clues about the evolution of the universe. They are so difficult to catch, in fact, that it's possible there's a fourth type that's been hiding right under our noses for decades. Scientists at the UChicago-affiliated Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory , site of the most extensive neutrino research in the world, are leading an international collaboration to explore the possibility of a completely new particle.

Health - Business / Economics - 28.12.2018
What to know about sticking to New Year’s resolutions
Exercise more, lose weight, spend less money, learn a new skill - these common New Year's resolutions can be hard to keep. That's why Stanford researchers have looked at how to positively change one's lifestyle. Here are some of their findings. In January, many will set a goal for the New Year that for most will be hard to keep.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 28.12.2018
Brain scans help predict drug relapse
Brain scans help predict drug relapse
In a small trial, brain scans revealed who was most at risk of relapsing after being treated for addiction to stimulants like amphetamines or cocaine. The finding could identify people who need help staying drug-free. Predicting who will remain drug-free and who will relapse following treatment for drug addiction has been impossible - so far.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.12.2018
Imperial takes the fight to cancer in 2018
This year, researchers at Imperial made several important breakthroughs in understanding and potentially treating aggressive cancer types. The past few decades have seen remarkable progress in the survival rates of some cancers - particularly in the developed world, and particularly for cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and bowel.

Environment - 28.12.2018
7 times Imperial made you double-take in 2018
Some surprise headlines need a second look, and quirky studies can often have serious impact on our lives. From holographic teachers to turtles that breathe through their genitals, here are a handful of the stories that made readers do a double-take in 2018. Napoleon dynamite In August, research from Dr Matthew Genge revealed that electrically charged volcanic ash short-circuited Earth's atmosphere in 1815 causing global poor weather - and Napoleon's defeat at the Battle of Waterloo.

Materials Science - Physics - 28.12.2018
Next generation synthetic covalent 2-D materials unveiled
UAntwerp researchers from the CMT group, Dr. Mehmet Yagmurcukardes and Prof. Francois Peeters, in collaboration with a team from Manchester have uncovered novel 2D materials. (Nanowerk News) A team of researchers at the National Graphene Institute at The University of Manchester have developed a new method to synthesize 2D materials that are thought to be impossible or, at least, unobtainable by current technologies.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.12.2018
Research honored with Physics World
Research honored with Physics World "Breakthrough of the Year" awards
"Magic-angle" graphene named 2018 Breakthrough of the Year; first ionic plane and earliest evidence of hydrogen gas named to top 10 breakthroughs. Three scientific and engineering advances led by researchers in the MIT community have been named to Physics World's  10 Breakthroughs of 2018. One MIT-led discovery received the magazine's top honor: 2018 Breakthrough of the Year.

Physics - Chemistry - 27.12.2018
Machine learning speeds up atomistic simulations of water and ice
Machine learning speeds up atomistic simulations of water and ice
Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius' Why does ice float? Why does heavy water have a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study of researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the University of Göttingen and the University of Vienna and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics.

Physics - 24.12.2018
Joy of giving lasts longer than the joy of getting
Big Brains Podcast Climate change's human cost with Michael Greenstone The happiness we feel after a particular event or activity diminishes each time we experience that event, a phenomenon known as hedonic adaptation. But giving to others may be the exception to this rule, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Social Sciences - 24.12.2018
New global migration estimates show rates proportionally steady since 1990, high rate of return migration
New global migration estimates show rates proportionally steady since 1990, high rate of return migration
On today's increasingly crowded globe, human migration can strain infrastructure and resources. Accurate data on migration flows could help governments plan for and respond to immigrants. Yet these figures, when available, tend to be spotty and error-ridden, even in the developed world. Researchers have developed approaches to estimate migration rates, but even the best of these rely on unrealistic assumptions about the mass movement of people and yield migration rates that can fall far below reality.

Innovation / Technology - 24.12.2018
Mission accomplished for ESA's butane-propelled CubeSat
Mission accomplished for ESA’s butane-propelled CubeSat
The cereal-box sized GomX-4B - ESA's biggest small CubeSat yet flown - has completed its mission for the Agency, testing out new miniaturised technologies including: intersatellite link communication with its GomX-4A twin, a hyperspectral imager, star tracker and butane-based propulsion system. "This multifaceted little mission has performed extremely well in flight," says Roger Walker, overseeing ESA's Technology CubeSats.

Innovation / Technology - 24.12.2018
Mission accomplished for ESA's GomX-4B butane-propelled CubeSat
Mission accomplished for ESA’s GomX-4B butane-propelled CubeSat
The cereal-box sized GomX-4B - ESA's biggest small CubeSat yet flown - has completed its mission for the Agency, testing out new miniaturised technologies including: intersatellite link communication with its GomX-4A twin, a hyperspectral imager, star tracker and butane-based propulsion system. "This multifaceted little mission has performed extremely well in flight," says Roger Walker, overseeing ESA's Technology CubeSats.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.12.2018
ESA sets clock by distant spinning stars
ESA sets clock by distant spinning stars
ESA's technical centre in the Netherlands has begun running a pulsar-based clock. The 'PulChron' system measures the passing of time using millisecond-frequency radio pulses from multiple fast-spinning neutron stars. Operating since the end of November, this pulsar-based timing system is hosted in the Galileo Timing and Geodetic Validation Facility of ESA's ESTEC establishment, at Noordwijk in the Netherlands, and relies on ongoing observations by a five-strong array of radio telescopes across Europe.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.12.2018
A novel antibiotic resistance mechanism
A novel antibiotic resistance mechanism
Bacteria make use of a number of natural resistance strategies to overcome antibiotics. And it seems that this bacterial toolbox may be much more varied than previously thought. Scientists at the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with Inserm, INRA, the CNRS and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, have recently revealed an entirely unknown resistance mechanism in Listeria monocytogenes bacteria.

Health - 21.12.2018
Paramedics can safely evaluate psychiatric patients' medical condition in the field
Paramedics can safely evaluate psychiatric patients’ medical condition in the field
FINDINGS Emergency medical personnel in Alameda County, California, use a screening process for determining whether to “medically clear” patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies before transporting them. They identify patients who are at low risk for medical emergencies and take them directly to a special psychiatric emergency service facility specifically designed for people experiencing psychiatric crises.

Health - Business / Economics - 21.12.2018
Advancement of artificial intelligence opens health data privacy to attack
Advancement of artificial intelligence opens health data privacy to attack
Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of health data, a new UC Berkeley study shows. The study, led by professor Anil Aswani of the Industrial Engineering & Operations Research Department (IEOR) in the College of Engineering and his team, suggests current laws and regulations are nowhere near sufficient to keep an individual's health status private in the face of AI development.

Health - Administration - 21.12.2018
Shows dementia care program delays nursing home admissions, cuts Medicare costs
Shows dementia care program delays nursing home admissions, cuts Medicare costs
New research shows that a comprehensive, coordinated care program for people with dementia and their caregivers significantly decreased the likelihood that the individuals would enter a nursing home. The study also shows that the program saved Medicare money and was cost-neutral after accounting for program costs.
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