news 2018


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Medicine/Pharmacology - Environment/Sustainable Development
16.01.2018
Novartis new data reinforces superiority of Cosentyx versus Stelara * in achieving skin clearance for psoriasis patients
Results from CLARITY study show Cosentyx (secukinumab) was significantly more effective than Stelara * (ustekinumab) in delivering clear and almost clear skin at 12 weeks and at 16 weeks Data support findings from the CLEAR study, which found Cosentyx was superior to Stelara * in achieving sustained skin clearance (PASI 90) at 52 weeks Cosentyx is the first and only fully human interleukin-17A (IL-17A) inhibitor that showed sustained skin cleara
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
16.01.2018
Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease risk
Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease risk
Massive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases. University of Queensland researchers have pioneered a method to integrate data from multiple large-scale studies to assess risk factors such as body mass index (BMI) and cholesterol levels, and their association with diseases including type two diabetes and heart disease.
Computer Science/Telecom - Chemistry
15.01.2018
Protocells with unpredictable complexity tamed by artificial intelligence
In new University of Glasgow research published today (January 15) in the journal PNAS , a robot equipped with artificial intelligence was able to build unstable oil-in-water droplets as models for new artificial life forms. It was also able to predict their properties ahead of time even though conventional physical methods failed to do so.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.01.2018
How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected families
How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected families
Researchers have shown for the first time how children can inherit a severe - potentially fatal - mitochondrial disease from a healthy mother. The study, led by researchers from the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, reveals that healthy people harbour mutations in their mitochondrial DNA and explains how cases of severe mitochondrial disease can appear unexpectedly in previously unaffected families.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
15.01.2018
War in Ukraine has escalated HIV spread in the country
Conflict in Ukraine has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks throughout the country as displaced HIV-infected people move from war-affected regions to areas with higher risk of transmission, according to analysis by scientists. Ukraine, which has the highest HIV prevalence in Europe, has been at war since 2014 following political unrest in the country.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.01.2018
Biologists' new peptide could fight many cancers
Biologists’ new peptide could fight many cancers
MIT biologists have designed a new peptide that can disrupt a key protein that many types of cancers, including some forms of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast cancer, need to survive. The new peptide targets a protein called Mcl-1, which helps cancer cells avoid the cellular suicide that is usually induced by DNA damage.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
15.01.2018
X-Rays Reveal 'Handedness' in Swirling Electric Vortices
X-Rays Reveal ’Handedness’ in Swirling Electric Vortices
Scientists at Berkeley Lab study exotic material's properties, which could make possible a new form of data storage Scientists used spiraling X-rays at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to observe, for the first time, a property that gives handedness to swirling electric patterns - dubbed polar vortices - in a synthetically layered material.
Architecture - Computer Science/Telecom
15.01.2018
Environment/Sustainable Development
15.01.2018
Communication methods do not work equally across diverse teams
ANN ARBOR-More recent thought on how to reach consensus among members of diverse teams for the best outcome has been to use text rather than face-to-face communication, but new research from the University of Michigan shows it's not that simple. Lionel Robert, associate professor at the U-M School of Information, and colleagues found that the kind of diversity matters when it comes to success of the communication method.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
15.01.2018
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton blooms
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton blooms
Phytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, the ERC remOcean 1 project, led by researchers at the Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), has developed a new class of robots: biogeochemical profiling floats, the first robots able to collect data in the ocean throughout the year.
Administration/Government - Law/Forensics
15.01.2018
New quality certification for cloud service providers
New quality certification for cloud service providers
Research news The volume of digital data produced and stored by companies is growing. Cloud technology offers a convenient solution: IT service providers offer storage space or software which enables data to be saved remotely. But how can companies be sure that their data is protected against unauthorized access or deletion? Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have studied this issue and developed a model which allows service providers to be checked and certified reliably.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Architecture
15.01.2018
Smart buildings that can manage our electricity needs
Smart buildings that can manage our electricity needs
Researchers at EPFL have developed a system that can be installed in a building to collect data on people's energy usage. The aim is then to send this data directly to a smart electric grid that will allocate resources optimally. A smart grid that decides how best to distribute energy based on availability, cost and customers' needs - that's the energy concept being developed by researchers in the School of Engineering's Electronics Laboratory.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
12.01.2018
New technology for diagnosing immunity to Ebola
New technology for diagnosing immunity to Ebola
A promising new approach to detect immunity to Ebola virus infection has been developed by researchers from i-sense in a collaboration between UCL and Imperial College London. Published in ACS Nano , the new approach uses lateral flow technology, similar to that of a pregnancy test, coupled with smartphones to provide a promising alternative to lab-based testing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.01.2018
Can psychedelic drugs ’reconnect’ depressed patients with their emotions?
Imperial research suggests psilocybin can help relieve the symptoms of depression, without blunting of the emotions linked with antidepressant drugs. Working out if someone is happy, angry or afraid, from the look on their face, is a skill we may take for granted. For some people, however, such as those with chronic depression, this innate ability to pick up on and respond to emotional prompts like a facial expression can be disrupted, with the brain becoming oversensitive to negative stimuli.
Life Sciences
12.01.2018
Led Team Uncovers the Physiology Behind the Hour-long Mating Call of Midshipman Fish
Led Team Uncovers the Physiology Behind the Hour-long Mating Call of Midshipman Fish
According to the Guinness World Records, the longest any person has held a continuous vocal note is just shy of two minutes. That's quite an achievement. Compared to the Pacific midshipman fish, however, the endurance of the human vocal cord is no match. Midshipman fish can generate a mating call that emits continuously from their bodies for a full hour.
Physics/Materials Science
12.01.2018
Quantum systems work together for change, UChicago scientists find
The common link between liquid-crystal TVs and the birth of the universe, when you look at the big picture, is that they are both characterized by the intriguing phenomenon in which matter abruptly changes states. Scientists want to better understand and control the behavior of particles at the exact moment that these so-called phase transitions-a change in energy in a system, much like process in which water evaporates or turns to ice-occur.
Life Sciences - Social Sciences
12.01.2018
Friends’ genes may help friends stay in school
While there's scientific evidence to suggest that your genes have something to do with how far you'll go in school, new research by a team from Stanford and elsewhere says the DNA of your classmates also plays a role. "We examined whether the genes of your peer groups influenced your height, weight or educational attainment.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.01.2018
Immunotherapy highly effective in treatment of rare skin cancer, study finds
FINDINGS In a UCLA-led study, more than two-thirds of people with a rare type of melanoma responded positively to treatment with anti-PD-1 immunotherapies. The findings, which counter the conventional wisdom that a cancer which is highly fibrotic could not respond to immunotherapy, have the potential to help scientists identify those patients most likely to benefit from treatment.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Careers/Employment
12.01.2018
Nurse staffing levels linked to patient satisfaction
Satisfaction with care in hospitals declines when patients believe there are not enough nurses on wards, according to a new study based on the NHS Inpatient Survey published in the BMJ Open . Only 14 per cent of patients who reported there was never or rarely enough nurses on the hospital ward rated their care as excellent, while 57 percent of patients who reported there were usually enough nurses rated their care as excellent.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.01.2018
Adverse impact of both type 2 and type 1 diabetes on pregnancy outcomes
Adverse impact of both type 2 and type 1 diabetes on pregnancy outcomes
A new study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) reveals that both type 2 (T2D) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with complications during pregnancy including stillbirths and emergency Caesarean sections, as well as increasing the risk of infant mortality.
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