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Physics - Pharmacology - 31.12.2018
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2018
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community, from world-leading research to incredible innovations. Before 2019 is upon us, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views). Here are our top 10 stories of 2018.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 28.12.2018
Brain scans help predict drug relapse
Brain scans help predict drug relapse
In a small trial, brain scans revealed who was most at risk of relapsing after being treated for addiction to stimulants like amphetamines or cocaine. The finding could identify people who need help staying drug-free. Predicting who will remain drug-free and who will relapse following treatment for drug addiction has been impossible - so far.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.12.2018
A novel antibiotic resistance mechanism
A novel antibiotic resistance mechanism
Bacteria make use of a number of natural resistance strategies to overcome antibiotics. And it seems that this bacterial toolbox may be much more varied than previously thought. Scientists at the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with Inserm, INRA, the CNRS and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, have recently revealed an entirely unknown resistance mechanism in Listeria monocytogenes bacteria.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.12.2018
1000: the cost of delivering a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS
A new study suggests rolling out a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS could cost around 1,067 per participant in its first year - or, factoring in the likelihood of success, 2,564 for each case of remission. Researchers say findings 'make the case for shifting resources to offer remission' in the future.

Pharmacology - Computer Science - 20.12.2018
Concerns raised as opioid prescriptions rise across UK
Researchers recommend greater action to promote best practice as a new study reveals a rise in prescriptions of opioids for treating chronic pain rise between 1998 and 2018. A review of opioid prescribing in the UK has shown that UK doctors are prescribing more and stronger opioid drugs to patients.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.12.2018
From eyedrops to potential leukaemia treatment
An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed by experts in Nottingham has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer, research has shown. Researchers from the University of Nottingham worked on the research led by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, University of Cambridge, and other collaborators which found that the compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukaemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.12.2018
Scientists break new ground in potential treatment of common form of leukaemia
Scientists at the University of Glasgow have discovered a potential combination therapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most common form of leukaemia in the Western world, diagnosed in more than 3,500 people in the UK each year. The research, carried out in collaboration with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) and published in Clinical Cancer Research , found that the combination of ibrutinib, a targeted treatment already in clinical use, with a new inhibitor called AZD8055, helped promote CLL cell death in a preclinical study.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Lithium might work as an anti-aging drug, depending on your genes
There is growing evidence that lithium could be re-purposed as an anti-aging drug, and a new study from King's College London suggests that lithium's protective effects are due to a slowing down of the molecular aging process in cells. The research, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology , also finds some individuals may benefit from lithium's anti-aging properties more than others, depending on their genetics.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease
Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease
Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions, disabilities and stigmatisation. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) together with colleagues from Singapore have discovered a highly effective compound against Buruli ulcer which has the potential to become a powerful alternative to the existing treatment options.

Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Ground-breaking languages project to move to the University of Birmingham
Patients with an abnormal heart rhythm that can leave them at a higher risk of suffering from stroke still need treatment even after their heart rhythm seems to have returned to normal, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, affecting around 1.6 million people in the UK.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.12.2018
Buruli ulcer: New drug against a forgotten disease
Buruli ulcer: New drug against a forgotten disease
Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions and disabilities. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), which is associated with the University of Basel, together with colleagues from Singapore have discovered a highly effective compound against Buruli ulcer.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.12.2018
Measuring speed of mental replay of movies reveals new insights into how we access memories
Technology from the LHC's ATLAS experiment to be used in cancer detection and treatment at UK's first high energy proton beam therapy centre Technology from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - where the Higgs Boson was discovered - will be used in hospitals to improve cancer treatments that employ proton beam therapy.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.12.2018
Could cancer anti-sickness drug end the misery for IBS patients?
Could a commonly-prescribed anti-sickness drug be the answer for the 1.3 million people in the UK who suffer the pain and misery of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D)? A nationwide clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Nottingham and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) will assess the medication ondansetron, which is currently used by doctors to help cancer patients cope with the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of intestinal schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Modelling for New Schistosomiasis Treatment Thresholds
Schistosomiasis is a parasitic worm infection affecting 250 million people globally. The current prevalence thresholds for preventive chemotherapy of intestinal schistosomiasis are based on the Kato-Katz method using stool samples. A new more sensitive point-of-care urine test is now available in particular for settings with low prevalence.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Two generations of alumni celebrate at degree congregation
New recommendations, led by experts at the University of Birmingham, have been published to improve the use of liver blood tests. The recommendations, published in Gut, are aimed at helping healthcare workers diagnose patients with liver disease as well as preventing unnecessary repeat tests for people unlikely to have significant liver disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Artificial intelligence-based device detects moving parasites in bodily fluid for easier, earlier diagnosis
Artificial intelligence-based device detects moving parasites in bodily fluid for easier, earlier diagnosis
Science + Technology Developed by UCLA Engineering researchers, system is 'like a motion detector for the microscopic world' Amy Akmal Scientists typically diagnose parasitic infections by scanning bodily fluid samples with optical microscopes. But that conventional approach sometimes doesn't work — for example, if the concentration of parasites in the sample is too low, or if the microscope's imaging capabilities lack the sensitivity to detect disease early on.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.12.2018
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
Ingestible capsule can be controlled wirelessly
Electronic pill can relay diagnostic information or release drugs in response to smartphone commands. Researchers at MIT, Draper, and Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. The capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions, or both, can reside in the stomach for at least a month, transmitting information and responding to instructions from a user's smartphone.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.12.2018
Researchers use zinc to target insulin-producing cells with regenerative drug
To treat diabetes directly, rather than manage its symptoms, doctors need a way to get drugs to cells that produce insulin. The key, Stanford researchers report, may be those cells' affinity for zinc. An insulin injection can manage diabetes symptoms, but actually curing the disease would mean healing cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in blood.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.12.2018
The blood test that could save sight
The blood test that could save sight
A new blood test is being developed at The Australian National University (ANU) that can detect patients at risk of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and potentially save millions of people from going blind. Dry AMD is a common eye disorder that is caused by damage to the macular - the part of the eye that is responsible for our sharpest vision.
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