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Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.09.2019
Opinion: Five climate change science misconceptions - debunked
Professor Mark Maslin (UCL Geography) writes about common climate change myths and explains how each can be disproven. The science of climate change is more than 150 years old and it is probably the most tested area of modern science. However the energy industry, political lobbyists and others have spent the last 30 years sowing doubt about the science where none really exists.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.09.2019
Introducing VPLanet: A virtual planet simulator for modeling distant worlds across time
University of Washington astrobiologist Rory Barnes and co-authors have created VPLanet, a software package that simulates multiple aspects of planetary evolution across billions of years, with an eye toward finding and studying potentially habitable worlds. ESA/Hubble, NASA University of Washington astrobiologist Rory Barnes has created software that simulates multiple aspects of planetary evolution across billions of years, with an eye toward finding and studying potentially habitable worlds.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 19.09.2019
Opinion: How we detected water on a potentially habitable exoplanet for the first time
Angelos Tsiaras (UCL Physics & Astronomy) writes about the methods used to discover water vapour in the atmosphere of K2-18 b, the first potentially habitable planet outside of our solar system. With more than 4,000 exoplanets - planets orbiting stars other than our sun - discovered so far, it may seem like we are on the cusp of finding out whether we are alone in the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 18.09.2019
Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age
About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. The seas began to ice over at the Earth's poles, and the new range of temperatures around the planet set the stage for a boom of new species. The cause of this ice age was a mystery, until now: a new study by a group of scientists including a University of Chicago professor argues that the ice age was caused by global cooling, triggered by extra dust in the atmosphere from a giant asteroid collision in outer space.

Computer Science / Telecom - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.09.2019
Deep dive for dark matter may aid all of data science
Deep dive for dark matter may aid all of data science
National Science Foundation backs Rice-led effort to create science-aware artificial intelligence A Rice University scientist and his colleagues are booting their search for dark matter into a study they hope will enhance all of data science. Rice astroparticle physicist Christopher Tunnell and his team have received a $1 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to reimagine data science techniques and help push data-intensive physical sciences past the tipping point to discovery.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 18.09.2019
CMU Professor Assists International Experiment in Pinning Down Elusive Neutrino Mass
An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant, yet elusive, elementary particles in our universe. At the 2019 Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics conference in Toyama, Japan, leaders from the KATRIN experiment reported Friday that the estimated range for the rest mass of the neutrino is between 0.02 and 1 electron volts, or eV.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.09.2019
Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
Artificial intelligence probes dark matter in the universe
A team of physicists and computer scientists at ETH Zurich has developed a new approach to the problem of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. Using machine learning tools, they programmed computers to teach themselves how to extract the relevant information from maps of the universe. Understanding the how our universe came to be what it is today and what will be its final destiny is one of the biggest challenges in science.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.09.2019
William Meadow, pioneer in neonatal intensive care and medical ethics, 1948-2019
About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. The seas began to ice over at the Earth's poles, and the new range of temperatures around the planet set the stage for a boom of new species. The cause of this ice age was a mystery, until now: a new study by a group of scientists including a University of Chicago professor argues that the ice age was caused by global cooling, triggered by extra dust in the atmosphere from a giant asteroid collision in outer space.

Astronomy / Space Science - Music - 16.09.2019
Space Station science: learning from Luca
Space Station science: learning from Luca
There is plenty of science on the boil at the International Space Station - including an experiment literally designed to expand our knowledge of the boiling process. Get a glimpse into the experiments ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano has been working on over the past two weeks in this fortnightly spotlight on Space Station science.

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.09.2019
The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies
The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies
An international team headed by UNIGE has discovered that the properties of molecular clouds, and the number of stars they produce, are different depending on whether they are in distant or nearby galaxies. Star clusters are formed by the condensation of molecular clouds, masses of cold, dense gas that are found in every galaxy.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.09.2019
New results for the mass of neutrinos
New results for the mass of neutrinos
Apart from photons, the fundamental quanta of light, neutrinos are the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. As they possess a small non-zero mass, these “light-weights of the universe” play a key role in cosmology and particle physics. The most precise scale for neutrinos in the world is the international experiment "KATRIN" at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, in which scientists of the University of Münster are also involved.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.09.2019
KATRIN Cuts the Mass Estimate for the Elusive Neutrino in Half
KATRIN Cuts the Mass Estimate for the Elusive Neutrino in Half
Original release published by the University of Washington. An international team of scientists that includes researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant yet elusive elementary particles in our universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 16.09.2019
KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half
KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half
An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant, yet elusive, elementary particles in our universe. At the 2019 Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics conference in Toyama, Japan, leaders from the KATRIN experiment reported Sept.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.09.2019
Yearly snapshot of Saturn helps astronomers monitor the ringed world
Yearly snapshot of Saturn helps astronomers monitor the ringed world
The Hubble Space Telescope's annual snapshot of Saturn reveals a turbulent, dynamic atmosphere with small storms popping into view as others disappear, all framed by the planet's bright, icy rings. Analyzed by Mike Wong of UC Berkeley and Amy Simon of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Hubble portrait is part of a yearly campaign to record the giant planets in the solar system - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune - to track shifting weather patterns and discover new phenomena.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.09.2019
Interstellar 2.0
Interstellar 2.0
Astronomers have spotted an object that looks likely to be a very rare visitor from outside our Solar System. If confirmed, this unusual body would be only the second interstellar object ever detected passing through our neighbourhood. Like the fascinating cigar-shaped 'Oumuamua , which flew by in 2017, this bright object is also a comet, yet it cuts a very different shape in the sky.

Materials Science - Astronomy / Space Science - 12.09.2019
Engineers develop
Engineers develop "blackest black" material to date
Made from carbon nanotubes, the new coating is 10 times darker than other very black materials. Fast Company reporter Mark Wilson writes that a collaboration between CAST artist-in-residence Diemut Strebe and Prof. Brian Wardle led to the creation of the blackest material ever made. "It's pretty interesting that the artist in my group influenced the science," says Wardle.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.09.2019
Scientists detect tones in the ringing of a newborn black hole for the first time
Scientists detect tones in the ringing of a newborn black hole for the first time
Results support Einstein's theory and the idea that black holes have no "hair." Boston Globe reporter Maria Lovato writes that MIT researchers have detected the ringing of an infant black hole, allowing them to calculate the black hole's mass and spin. "This is very exciting; we're going to be learning all types of things," explains postdoctoral fellow Maximiliano Isi.

Astronomy / Space Science - 11.09.2019
Unexpected periodic flares may shed light on black hole accretion
Unexpected periodic flares may shed light on black hole accretion
ESA's X-ray space telescope XMM-Newton has detected never-before-seen periodic flares of X-ray radiation coming from a distant galaxy that could help explain some enigmatic behaviours of active black holes. XMM-Newton , the most powerful X-ray observatory, discovered some mysterious flashes from the active black hole at the core of the galaxy GSN 069, about 250 million light years away.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 11.09.2019
Black hole at the center of our galaxy appears to be getting hungrier
The enormous black hole at the center of our galaxy is having an unusually large meal of interstellar gas and dust, and researchers don't yet understand why. “We have never seen anything like this in the 24 years we have studied the supermassive black hole,” said Andrea Ghez, UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and a co-senior author of the research.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.09.2019
First water detected on potentially 'habitable' planet
First water detected on potentially ’habitable’ planet
Water vapour has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures by UCL researchers in a world first. K2-18b, which is eight times the mass of Earth, is now the only planet orbiting a star outside the Solar System, or 'exoplanet', known to have both water and temperatures that could support life.
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