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Astronomy / Space Science - 20.05.2019
Formation of the moon brought water to earth
Formation of the moon brought water to earth
The Earth is unique in our solar system: It is the only terrestrial planet with a large amount of water and a relatively large moon, which stabilizes the Earth's axis. Both were essential for Earth to develop life. Planetologists at the University of Münster have now been able to show, for the first time, that water came to Earth with the formation of the Moon some 4.4 billion years ago.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.05.2019
Mission control 'saves science'
Mission control ’saves science’
17 May 2019 Every minute, ESA's Earth observation satellites gather dozens of gigabytes of data about our planet - enough information to fill the pages on a 100-metre long bookshelf. Flying in low-Earth orbits, these spacecraft are continuously taking the pulse of our planet, but it's teams on the ground at ESA's Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, that keep these explorers afloat.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.05.2019
3D Earth in the making
3D Earth in the making
15 May 2019 A thorough understanding of the 'solid Earth' system is essential for deciphering the links between processes occurring deep inside Earth and those occurring nearer the surface that lead to seismic activity such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, the rise of mountains and the location of underground natural resources.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.05.2019
Water cycle wrapped
15 May 2019 As our climate changes, the availability of freshwater is a growing issue for many people around the world. Understanding the water cycle and how the climate and human usage is causing shifts in natural cycling processes is vital to safeguarding supplies. While numerous satellites measure individual components of the water cycle, it has never been described as a whole over a particular region - until now.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.05.2019
EUMETSAT, Japanese space agency to cooperate on greenhouse gas monitoring
EUMETSAT and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) today signed an agreement which will result in the agencies working closely together to monitor greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere. Mr Kazuo Tachi, on behalf of the Direc tor General of JAXA's Space Technology Directorate 1 Ryoichi Imai, and EUMETSAT Director-General Alain Ratier signed the agreement at a ceremony at EUMETSAT's Darmstadt headquarters today.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 13.05.2019
Space Station science looking at Earth
Space Station science looking at Earth
13 May 2019 In this edition of our bi-weekly update on European research run on the International Space Station, we're taking our cue from the Living Planet Symposium - the largest conference on Earth Observation taking place this week in Milan, Italy - and focusing on our own planet. Marine traffic Many of the experiments that run on the International Space Station do not require astronaut intervention after the initial setup and periodic check-ups.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 13.05.2019
How Venus and Mars can teach us about Earth
How Venus and Mars can teach us about Earth
13 May 2019 One has a thick poisonous atmosphere, one has hardly any atmosphere at all, and one is just right for life to flourish - but it wasn't always that way. The atmospheres of our two neighbours Venus and Mars can teach us a lot about the past and future scenarios for our own planet. Rewind 4.6 billion years from the present day to the planetary construction yard, and we see that all the planets share a common history: they were all born from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, with the newborn Sun ignited at the centre.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 09.05.2019
Rare-Earth metals in the atmosphere of a glowing-hot exoplanet
KELT-9 b is the hottest exoplanet known to date. In the summer of 2018, a joint team of astronomers from the universities of Bern and Geneva found signatures of gaseous iron and titanium in its atmosphere. Now these researchers have also been able to detect traces of vaporized sodium, magnesium, chromium, and the rare-Earth metals scandium and yttrium.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.05.2019
A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe
A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe
The earliest known light in our universe, known as the cosmic microwave background, was emitted about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The patterning of this relic light holds many important clues to the development and distribution of large-scale structures such as galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Astronomy / Space Science - Music - 06.05.2019
Blue supergiant stars open doors to concert in space
Blue supergiants are rock 'n' roll: they live fast and die young. This makes them rare and difficult to study. Before space telescopes were invented, few blue supergiants had been observed, so our knowledge of these stars was limited. Using recent NASA space telescope data, an international team led by KU Leuven studied the sounds originating inside these stars and discovered that almost all blue supergiants shimmer in brightness because of waves on their surface.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.05.2019
New gravitational waves found, we just don't know where they come from (yet)
New gravitational waves found, we just don’t know where they come from (yet)
The international team hunting for gravitational waves last week made the announcement of its first discoveries from the 2019 run. Professor Tara Murphy and colleagues unpack what this means. The hunt for  gravitational waves  is back on with the  announcement last week  of the detection of signals from what's thought to be the merger of two  neutron stars , the incredibly dense remains of a collapsed star.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.05.2019
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Within weeks of switching their machines back on to scour the sky for more sources of gravitational waves, scientists are poring over data in an attempt to further understand an unprecedented cosmic event. Astronomers working at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector have reported the possible detection of gravitational waves emanating from the collision of a neutron star and a black hole.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 03.05.2019
Stop ageing in space
Stop ageing in space
3 May 2019 Wrinkles, muscle pain, high blood pressure and a clumsy brain are all natural consequences of getting old. As our cells rust over time, a key to fighting chronic disease may be in tiny, smartly designed particles that have the potential to become an anti-ageing supplement. A European experiment seeking innovative antioxidants is on its way to space.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.05.2019
UofG astrophysicists investigate two new neutron star collisions
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are celebrating the detection of gravitational wave signals likely to be caused by the crashing of two neutron stars and what could be the first evidence of the collision of a neutron star and a black hole. The University of Glasgow researchers are key partners in the international scientific collaboration which made the new detections - the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), based in the United States, and Virgo, based in Italy.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.05.2019
3 Questions: Salvatore Vitale on LIGO's latest detections
3 Questions: Salvatore Vitale on LIGO’s latest detections
"We will keep listening for these faint and remote cosmic whispers," says the physics professor. Sky and Telescope editor Monica Young speaks with WBUR about how scientists from the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories, including MIT researchers, may have detected a black hole colliding with a neutron star.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.04.2019
Scientists get to the bottom of a 'spitting' black hole
Scientists get to the bottom of a ’spitting’ black hole
29 April 2019 Data from ESA's Integral high-energy observatory have helped shed light on the workings of a mysterious black hole found spitting out 'bullets' of plasma while rotating through space. The black hole is part of a binary system known as V404 Cygni and is sucking in material from a companion star.

Astronomy / Space Science - 26.04.2019
The day the asteroid might hit
The day the asteroid might hit
26 April 2019 For the first time, ESA will cover a major international asteroid impact exercise live via social media, highlighting the the actions that might be taken by scientists, space agencies and civil protection organisations. Every two years, asteroid experts from across the globe come together to simulate a fictional but plausible imminent asteroid impact on Earth.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Astroparticle physicists observe the longest half-life ever directly measured
Astroparticle physicists observe the longest half-life ever directly measured
The universe is almost 14 billion years old. An inconceivable length of time by human standards - yet compared to some physical processes, it is but a moment. There are radioactive nuclei that decay on much longer time scales. An international team of scientists has now directly measured the rarest decay process ever recorded in a detector.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Researchers Observe Slowest Atom Decay Ever Measured
Researchers Observe Slowest Atom Decay Ever Measured
The XENON1T detector is mainly used to detect dark matter particles deep underground. But a research team led by Zurich physicists, among others, has now managed to observe an extremely rare process using the detector - the decay of the Xenon-124 atom, which has an enormously long half-life of 1.8 x 10^22 years.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 24.04.2019
Scientists measure half-life of element that’s longer than the age of the universe
Deep under an Italian mountainside, a giant detector filled with tons of liquid xenon has been looking for dark matter-particles of a mysterious substance whose effects we can see in the universe, but which no one has ever directly observed. Along the way, however, the detector caught another scientific unicorn: the decay of atoms of xenon-124-the rarest process ever observed in the universe.
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