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Astronomy / Space Science - 21.03.2019
Testing the value of artificial gravity for astronaut health
Testing the value of artificial gravity for astronaut health
Test subjects in Cologne, Germany will take to their beds for 60 days from 25 March as part of a groundbreaking study, funded by European Space Agency ESA and US space agency NASA, into how artificial gravity could help astronauts stay healthy in space. Carried out at the German Aerospace Center's (DLR) :envihab facility, the long-term bedrest study is the first of its kind to be conducted in partnership between the two agencies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.03.2019
Giant 'chimneys' vent X-rays from Milky Way's core
Giant ’chimneys’ vent X-rays from Milky Way’s core
By surveying the centre of our Galaxy, ESA's XMM-Newton has discovered two colossal 'chimneys' funneling material from the vicinity of the Milky Way's supermassive black hole into two huge cosmic bubbles. The giant bubbles were discovered in 2010 by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope: one stretches above the plane of the Milky Way galaxy and the other below, forming a shape akin to a colossal hourglass that spans about 50 000 light years - around half the diameter of the entire Galaxy.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.03.2019
Giant X-ray 'chimneys' are exhaust vents for vast energies produced at Milky Way's center
Giant X-ray ’chimneys’ are exhaust vents for vast energies produced at Milky Way’s center
Study co-authored by UCLA astronomer provides close look at what might be happening in other, more energetic galaxies Christopher Crockett The center of our galaxy is a frenzy of activity. A behemoth black hole — 4 million times as massive as the sun — blasts out energy as it chows down on interstellar detritus while neighboring stars burst to life and subsequently explode.

Astronomy / Space Science - Innovation / Technology - 20.03.2019
Taking gravity from strength to strength
Ten years ago, ESA launched one of its most innovative satellites. GOCE spent four years measuring a fundamental force of nature: gravity. This extraordinary mission not only yielded new insights into our gravity field, but led to some amazing discoveries about our planet, from deep below the surface to high up in the atmosphere and beyond.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 15.03.2019
New 3D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries
New 3D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries
A new study led by ANU has created a 3D map of the magnetic field in a small wedge of the Milky Way galaxy, paving the way for future discoveries that will improve our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Universe. Lead researcher Dr Aris Tritsis from the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) said this was the first study to tomographically measure the strength of our galaxy's magnetic field.

Astronomy / Space Science - 13.03.2019
Thank Earth's magnetic field for water that gives you life
Thank Earth’s magnetic field for water that gives you life
A study by scientists at ANU†on the magnetic fields of planets has found that most planets discovered in other solar systems are unlikely to be as hospitable to life as Earth. Plants and animals would not survive without water on Earth. The sheer strength of Earth's magnetic field helps to maintain liquid water on our blue planet's surface, thereby making it possible for life to thrive.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 13.03.2019
Neural networks predict planet mass
To find out how planets form astrophysicists run complicated and time consuming computer calculations. Members of the NCCR PlanetS at the University of Bern have now developed a totally novel approach to speed up this process dramatically. They use deep learning based on artificial neural networks, a method that is well known in image recognition.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.03.2019
Floating ideas for an airlock near the Moon
Floating ideas for an airlock near the Moon
Assembly of a new habitable structure near the Moon, known as the Gateway , is scheduled to begin in 2023. The international project will allow humans to explore farther than ever before and it brings new opportunities for European design in space. In late 2018, ESA commissioned two consortia - one led by Airbus and the other by Thales Alenia Space - to undertake parallel studies into the design of a scientific airlock.

Astronomy / Space Science - 08.03.2019
Translating space know-how to ’sniff’ out salad quality
Researchers at Cardiff University are developing new technology which will be able to ‘smell' when fruit or vegetables are going off - potentially saving tonnes of waste. According to the UK waste advisory body WRAP, 1,200,000 tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables are needlessly wasted each year.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 06.03.2019
Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?
Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?
Physicists have used a seven-qubit quantum computer to simulate the scrambling of information inside a black hole, heralding a future in which entangled quantum bits might be used to probe the mysterious interiors of these bizarre objects. Scrambling is what happens when matter disappears inside a black hole.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2019
FASER detector at the Large Hadron Collider to seek clues about hidden matter in the universe
FASER detector at the Large Hadron Collider to seek clues about hidden matter in the universe
The research board of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, on March 5 approved a new experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, the world's largest particle accelerator, to search for evidence of fundamental dark matter particles. The Forward Search Experiment - or FASER - seeks to answer one of the outstanding questions in particle physics: What is dark matter made of?

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 05.03.2019
Making the environment of outer space work for us
Making the environment of outer space work for us
Inspired by early explorers and science fiction, researchers at the Space Environment and Satellite Systems lab are trying to understand how we could use space's challenging environment to our advantage. When explorers venture into the great unknown of outer space, they must bring along everything they need.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2019
The science circling above us on the Space Station
The science circling above us on the Space Station
The International Space Station orbits Earth, 400 km above our heads, running scientific experiments that cannot be done anywhere else. Read on for our bi-weekly update on European science in space. This week ESA is highlighting space weather, so let us start with the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) that was installed outside Europe's Columbus laboratory on the International Space Station last year.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 05.03.2019
ESA gives go-ahead for Smile mission with China
ESA gives go-ahead for Smile mission with China
The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer, Smile, has been given the green light for implementation by ESA's Science Programme Committee. The announcement clears the way for full development of this new mission to explore the Sun-Earth connection, which will be conducted in collaboration with China.

Astronomy / Space Science - 05.03.2019
Kepler Space Telescope’s First Exoplanet Candidate Confirmed, Ten Years After Launch
An international team of astronomers, led by University of Hawai'i graduate student Ashley Chontos, announced the confirmation of the first exoplanet candidate identified by NASA's Kepler Mission. The result was presented today at the fifth Kepler/K2 Science Conference held in Glendale, CA. Launched almost exactly 10 years ago, the Kepler Space Telescope has discovered thousands of exoplanets using the transit method - small dips in a star's brightness as planets cross in front of the star.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 28.02.2019
Fit for Mars
Fit for Mars
Rovers are versatile explorers on the surface of other planets, but they do need some training before setting off. A model of Rosalind Franklin rover that will be sent to Mars in 2021 is scouting the Atacama Desert, in Chile, following commands from mission control in the United Kingdom, over 11 000 km away.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 28.02.2019
First evidence of planet-wide groundwater system on Mars
First evidence of planet-wide groundwater system on Mars
Mars Express has revealed the first geological evidence of a system of ancient interconnected lakes that once lay deep beneath the Red Planet's surface, five of which may contain minerals crucial to life. Mars appears to be an arid world, but its surface shows compelling signs that large amounts of water once existed across the planet.

Astronomy / Space Science - 28.02.2019
CMU’s ZoŽ Rover Shows Robots Can Find Subterranean Organisms
An autonomous rover named Zoë, designed and built by Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute , drilled into the soil of Chile's Atacama Desert in 2013 and discovered unusual, highly specialized microbes. The NASA-funded mission demonstrated how robots might someday find life on Mars. The astrobiology mission was led by the Robotics Institute and the SETI Institute to test technologies for searching for life underground.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.02.2019
Exiled planet linked to stellar flyby 3 million years ago
Exiled planet linked to stellar flyby 3 million years ago
Some of the peculiar aspects of our solar system - an enveloping cloud of comets, dwarf planets in weird orbits and, if it truly exists, a possible Planet Nine far from the sun - have been linked to the close approach of another star in our system's infancy that flung things helter-skelter. But are stellar flybys really capable of knocking planets, comets and asteroids askew, reshaping entire planetary systems? UC Berkeley and Stanford University astronomers think they have now found a smoking gun.

Astronomy / Space Science - 25.02.2019
Stellar wind of old stars reveals existence of a partner
Red giants are old stars that eject gaseous material and solid particles through a stellar wind. Some red giants appeared to lose an exceptionally large amount of mass this way. However, new observations reveal that this is not quite the case. The stellar wind is not more intense than normal, but is affected by a partner that was overlooked until now: a second star that circles the red giant.
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